Alfacalcidol - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Alfacalcidol

The Experts below are selected from a list of 3531 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Toshio Matsumoto – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Chapter 93 – Eldecalcitol and Osteoporosis
    Vitamin D, 2020
    Co-Authors: Toshio Matsumoto, Fumiaki Takahashi

    Abstract:

    Abstract Eldecalcitol [1α,25-dihydroxy-2β-(3-hydroxypropyloxy)vitamin D3] is an analog of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], bearing a hydroxypropyloxy residue at the 2β position. Its chemical structure gives eldecalcitol unique features of actions with long serum half-life, lower affinity but stable binding to vitamin D receptor, and little metabolism via 24-hydroxylation. Eldecalcitol suppresses bone resorption to a greater extent than Alfacalcidol by reducing osteoclast number but has a similar effect on bone formation because of resorption-independent minimodeling, resulting in a greater increase in bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats. In osteoporotic patients, eldecalcitol shows stronger effects than Alfacalcidol in increasing bone mineral density and reducing bone resorption markers. Once-daily 0.75 μg eldecalcitol reduces the incidence of vertebral fracture compared with 1.0 μg Alfacalcidol. In addition, eldecalcitol strongly reduces wrist fracture incidence. It is not known whether eldecalcitol has a stronger effect in preventing falls than Alfacalcidol.

  • eldecalcitol is superior to Alfacalcidol in maintaining bone mineral density in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis patients e gloria
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 2020
    Co-Authors: Toshio Matsumoto, Kazuhiko Yamamoto, Tsutomu Takeuchi, Yoshiya Tanaka, Sakae Tanaka, Tetsuo Nakano, Tatsuya Tomomitsu, Akihiro Hirakawa, Satoshi Soen

    Abstract:

    Eldecalcitol increases bone mineral density (BMD) and reduces vertebral fracture in patients with primary osteoporosis. However, the effect of eldecalcitol on BMD and fracture in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) patients is unknown. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of eldecalcitol on BMD and fracture with that of Alfacalcidol in GIO patients. A randomized, open-label, parallel group study was conducted to identify the effectiveness and safety of monotherapy with 0.75 μg eldecalcitol compared with 1.0 μg Alfacalcidol in GIO patients. Lumbar spine BMD increased with eldecalcitol, but decreased with Alfacalcidol at 12 and 24 months (between group difference 1.29%, p   70% of the young adult mean, and with ≤ 3 months of previous glucocorticoid treatment. No significant difference in the incidence of vertebral fracture was found, and the incidence of adverse events was similar between the two groups. Eldecalcitol was more effective than Alfacalcidol in maintaining BMD in GIO patients. Because eldecalcitol was effective in patients with no or short-term previous glucocorticoid treatment, as well as those without prevalent fracture or low BMD, eldecalcitol can be a good candidate for primary prevention of GIO. UMIN000011700.

  • Eldecalcitol is superior to Alfacalcidol in maintaining bone mineral density in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis patients (e-GLORIA)
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 2020
    Co-Authors: Toshio Matsumoto, Kazuhiko Yamamoto, Tsutomu Takeuchi, Yoshiya Tanaka, Sakae Tanaka, Tetsuo Nakano, Tatsuya Tomomitsu, Akihiro Hirakawa, Satoshi Soen

    Abstract:

    Introduction Eldecalcitol increases bone mineral density (BMD) and reduces vertebral fracture in patients with primary osteoporosis. However, the effect of eldecalcitol on BMD and fracture in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) patients is unknown. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of eldecalcitol on BMD and fracture with that of Alfacalcidol in GIO patients. Materials and methods A randomized, open-label, parallel group study was conducted to identify the effectiveness and safety of monotherapy with 0.75 μg eldecalcitol compared with 1.0 μg Alfacalcidol in GIO patients. Results Lumbar spine BMD increased with eldecalcitol, but decreased with Alfacalcidol at 12 and 24 months (between group difference 1.29%, p 

Masataka Shiraki – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Eldecalcitol is more effective for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures than Alfacalcidol
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 2013
    Co-Authors: Toshitaka Nakamura, Masao Fukunaga, Toshiyuki Takano, Masataka Shiraki, Toshio Matsumoto

    Abstract:

    Eldecalcitol, a vitamin D_3 analogue, significantly reduces the risk of new vertebral fractures and increases bone mineral density (BMD) more than does Alfacalcidol. To determine the effect of eldecalcitol on the incidence of all fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis, we conducted post hoc analyses of the phase III clinical trial to evaluate the incidence of the osteoporotic fractures defined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Technical Report, and, also, the incidence of the major osteoporotic fractures utilized in the WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), and compared those in the eldecalcitol group with those in the Alfacalcidol group. We also analyzed the incidence of osteoporotic fractures stratified by prespecified risk factors for fractures. Eldecalcitol treatment reduced the incidence of osteoporotic fractures defined by the WHO more than Alfacalcidol treatment (18.6 % vs. 25.2 %; hazard ratio, 0.70; 95 % CI, 0.54–0.93). Prevalent vertebral fractures, two or more prevalent vertebral fractures, and total hip BMD T score less than −2.5 were the risk factors for new osteoporotic fractures with significant differences between the two treatments. Eldecalcitol also decreased the incidence of major osteoporotic fractures in the FRAX more than Alfacalcidol (11.1 % vs. 16.3 %; hazard ratio, 0.66; 95 % CI, 0.46–0.94). In conclusion, treatment with eldecalcitol reduced the risk of fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis compared with Alfacalcidol administration, which may result from a potent effect of eldecalcitol on BMD, bone structure, and bone turnover.

  • Eldecalcitol reduces the risk of severe vertebral fractures and improves the health-related quality of life in patients with osteoporosis
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, 2013
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Hagino, Toshiyuki Takano, Masao Fukunaga, Masataka Shiraki, Toshitaka Nakamura, Toshio Matsumoto

    Abstract:

    Eldecalcitol reduces the risk of vertebral fractures in comparison to Alfacalcidol in osteoporotic patients under vitamin D repletion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of eldecalcitol on the spinal location of incident vertebral fractures, the severity of the fractures, and the changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) compared with those of Alfacalcidol. The post hoc analysis has been performed on the data from the three-year, double-blind, randomized, head-to-head clinical trial of eldecalcitol versus Alfacalcidol conducted in Japan. A total of 1054 patients were enrolled and randomized to take 0.75 μg eldecalcitol or 1.0 μg Alfacalcidol daily for 3 years. The incidence of vertebral fractures was re-evaluated based on the location on the spine (upper T4–T10; lower T11–L4). The severity of vertebral fractures was determined by the semi-quantitative method, and the change in HRQOL was analyzed by using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-item questionnaire. The incidence of vertebral fracture at the lower spine was less in the eldecalcitol group than in the Alfacalcidol group ( p  = 0.029). The incidence of severe vertebral fracture (Grade 3) was 3.8 % in the eldecalcitol group and 6.7 % in the Alfacalcidol group, demonstrated a significant difference between the 2 groups ( p  = 0.036). Both eldecalcitol and Alfacalcidol improved HRQOL in osteoporotic patients. Although no significant differences in each HRQOL scores were observed between eldecalcitol and Alfacalcidol during the observational period, overall improvement from baseline of HRQOL scores were clearly observed in the eldecalcitol group. In conclusion, the incidences of lower spinal vertebral fractures and severe vertebral fractures were reduced further by eldecalcitol compared to Alfacalcidol in the 3-year clinical trial. Daily treatment with eldecalcitol is effective in improving HRQOL, possibly owing to the reduced risk of lower spinal vertebral fractures and/or severe vertebral fractures.

  • a new active vitamin d3 analog eldecalcitol prevents the risk of osteoporotic fractures a randomized active comparator double blind study
    Bone, 2011
    Co-Authors: Toshio Matsumoto, Masao Fukunaga, Masataka Shiraki, Yasufumi Hayashi, Takako Hirota, Yusuke Tanigawara, Teruki Sone, Toshitaka Nakamura

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Eldecalcitol is an analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 that improves bone mineral density; however, the effect of eldecalcitol on the risk of fractures is unclear. The objective of this study is to examine whether eldecalcitol is superior to Alfacalcidol in preventing osteoporotic fractures. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00144456. Methods and results This 3 year randomized, double-blind, active comparator, superiority trial tested the efficacy of daily oral 0.75 μg eldecalcitol versus 1.0 μg Alfacalcidol for prevention of osteoporotic fractures. 1054 osteoporotic patients 46 to 92 years old were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive eldecalcitol (n = 528) or Alfacalcidol (n = 526). Patients were stratified by study site and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level. Patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels ( 3 . Primary end point was incident vertebral fractures. Secondary end points included any non-vertebral fractures and change in bone mineral density and bone turnover markers. Compared with the Alfacalcidol group, the incidence of vertebral fractures was lower in eldecalcitol group after 36 months of treatment (13.4 vs. 17.5%; hazard ratio, 0.74; predefined 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.56–0.97). Eldecalcitol reduced turnover markers and increased bone mineral density more strongly than Alfacalcidol. Eldecalcitol reduced the incidence of three major non-vertebral fractures, which was due to a marked reduction in wrist fractures by a post-hoc analysis (1.1 vs. 3.6%; hazard ratio, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.11–0.77). Among the adverse events, the incidence of increase in serum and urinary calcium was higher in the eldecalcitol group, without any difference in glomerular filtration rate between the two groups. Conclusions Eldecalcitol is more efficacious than Alfacalcidol in preventing vertebral and wrist fractures in osteoporotic patients with vitamin D sufficiency, with a safety profile similar to Alfacalcidol.

Michio Sata – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • clinical trial comparison of alendronate and Alfacalcidol in glucocorticoid associated osteoporosis in patients with ulcerative colitis
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2009
    Co-Authors: S Kitazaki, Keiichi Mitsuyama, J Masuda, Kazunori Harada, Hiroshi Yamasaki, Kotaro Kuwaki, Hidetoshi Takedatsu, Gen Sugiyama, Osamu Tsuruta, Michio Sata

    Abstract:

    Summary

    Background  Bone loss is often observed in patients with ulcerative colitis, particularly if they require glucocorticoids.

    Aim  To determine whether the bisphosphonate, alendronate, is safe and effective in preserving bone mass compared to the active vitamin D3, Alfacalcidol, in ulcerative colitis patients receiving glucocorticoids.

    Methods  Thirty-nine patients with ulcerative colitis and treated with glucocorticoids were randomized to receive alendronate (5 mg/day) or Alfacalcidol (1 μg/day) daily for 12 months. Loss of bone mass was evaluated by bone mineral density, bone resorption by urinary N-telopeptide for type I collagen, and bone formation by serum bone alkaline phosphatase.

    Results  Alendronate, but not Alfacalcidol, significantly increased bone mineral density in the lumbar spine. Alendronate decreased serum bone alkaline phosphatase levels, but Alfacalcidol did not. Urinary N-telopeptide for type I collagen levels decreased in both groups, but were significantly lower in the alendronate group. There were no significant differences in the adverse events in the two groups.

    Conclusion  Our study indicates that alendronate is a safe, well-tolerated and more effective therapy than Alfacalcidol for preventing glucocorticoid-associated bone loss in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  • Clinical trial: comparison of alendronate and Alfacalcidol in glucocorticoid‐associated osteoporosis in patients with ulcerative colitis
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2008
    Co-Authors: S Kitazaki, Keiichi Mitsuyama, J Masuda, Kazunori Harada, Hiroshi Yamasaki, Kotaro Kuwaki, Hidetoshi Takedatsu, Osamu Tsuruta, Sugiyama, Michio Sata

    Abstract:

    Summary

    Background  Bone loss is often observed in patients with ulcerative colitis, particularly if they require glucocorticoids.

    Aim  To determine whether the bisphosphonate, alendronate, is safe and effective in preserving bone mass compared to the active vitamin D3, Alfacalcidol, in ulcerative colitis patients receiving glucocorticoids.

    Methods  Thirty-nine patients with ulcerative colitis and treated with glucocorticoids were randomized to receive alendronate (5 mg/day) or Alfacalcidol (1 μg/day) daily for 12 months. Loss of bone mass was evaluated by bone mineral density, bone resorption by urinary N-telopeptide for type I collagen, and bone formation by serum bone alkaline phosphatase.

    Results  Alendronate, but not Alfacalcidol, significantly increased bone mineral density in the lumbar spine. Alendronate decreased serum bone alkaline phosphatase levels, but Alfacalcidol did not. Urinary N-telopeptide for type I collagen levels decreased in both groups, but were significantly lower in the alendronate group. There were no significant differences in the adverse events in the two groups.

    Conclusion  Our study indicates that alendronate is a safe, well-tolerated and more effective therapy than Alfacalcidol for preventing glucocorticoid-associated bone loss in patients with ulcerative colitis.