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Alga

The Experts below are selected from a list of 285 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Yongsheng Chen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations

  • the use of the schizonticidal agent quinine sulfate to prevent pond crashes for Algal biofuel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while Algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides Algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in Algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  • use of copper to selectively inhibit brachionus calyciflorus predator growth in chlorella kessleri prey mass cultures for Algae biodiesel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Vishnupriya Pradeep, Sichoon Park, Thomas Igou, Christine Yi, Hao Fu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    A single Brachionus rotifer can consume thousands of Algae cells per hour causing an Algae pond to crash within days of infection. Thus, there is a great need to reduce rotifers in order for Algal biofuel production to become reality. Copper can selectively inhibit rotifers in Algae ponds, thereby protecting the Algae crop. Differential toxicity tests were conducted to compare the copper sensitivity of a model rotifer—B. calyciflorus and an Alga, C. kessleri. The rotifer LC50 was <0.1 ppm while the Alga was not affected up to 5 ppm Cu(II). The low pH of the rotifer stomach may make it more sensitive to copper. However, when these cultures were combined, a copper concentration of 1.5 ppm was needed to inhibit the rotifer as the Alga bound the copper, decreasing its bioavailability. Copper (X ppm) had no effect on downstream fatty acid methyl ester extraction.

Thomas Igou – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations

  • the use of the schizonticidal agent quinine sulfate to prevent pond crashes for Algal biofuel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while Algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides Algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in Algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  • use of copper to selectively inhibit brachionus calyciflorus predator growth in chlorella kessleri prey mass cultures for Algae biodiesel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Vishnupriya Pradeep, Sichoon Park, Thomas Igou, Christine Yi, Hao Fu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    A single Brachionus rotifer can consume thousands of Algae cells per hour causing an Algae pond to crash within days of infection. Thus, there is a great need to reduce rotifers in order for Algal biofuel production to become reality. Copper can selectively inhibit rotifers in Algae ponds, thereby protecting the Algae crop. Differential toxicity tests were conducted to compare the copper sensitivity of a model rotifer—B. calyciflorus and an Alga, C. kessleri. The rotifer LC50 was <0.1 ppm while the Alga was not affected up to 5 ppm Cu(II). The low pH of the rotifer stomach may make it more sensitive to copper. However, when these cultures were combined, a copper concentration of 1.5 ppm was needed to inhibit the rotifer as the Alga bound the copper, decreasing its bioavailability. Copper (X ppm) had no effect on downstream fatty acid methyl ester extraction.

Terry W. Snell – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the use of the schizonticidal agent quinine sulfate to prevent pond crashes for Algal biofuel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while Algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO) projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent). This provides Algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in Algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  • The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chunyan Xu, Thomas Igou, Kangyan Wu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Aditya Bhargava, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of Algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden Algae, and other predators will cause an Algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model Alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS), on both the Alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on Algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations

  • use of copper to selectively inhibit brachionus calyciflorus predator growth in chlorella kessleri prey mass cultures for Algae biodiesel production
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2015
    Co-Authors: Vishnupriya Pradeep, Sichoon Park, Thomas Igou, Christine Yi, Hao Fu, Steven W Van Ginkel, Rachel K. Johnston, Terry W. Snell, Yongsheng Chen

    Abstract:

    A single Brachionus rotifer can consume thousands of Algae cells per hour causing an Algae pond to crash within days of infection. Thus, there is a great need to reduce rotifers in order for Algal biofuel production to become reality. Copper can selectively inhibit rotifers in Algae ponds, thereby protecting the Algae crop. Differential toxicity tests were conducted to compare the copper sensitivity of a model rotifer—B. calyciflorus and an Alga, C. kessleri. The rotifer LC50 was <0.1 ppm while the Alga was not affected up to 5 ppm Cu(II). The low pH of the rotifer stomach may make it more sensitive to copper. However, when these cultures were combined, a copper concentration of 1.5 ppm was needed to inhibit the rotifer as the Alga bound the copper, decreasing its bioavailability. Copper (X ppm) had no effect on downstream fatty acid methyl ester extraction.