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Aloin – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Chandragouda R. Patil – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aloin alleviates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats by abrogating oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
    Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Shivani Wagh, Banappa S. Unger, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin, an anthraquinone present in the aloe species, possesses antiangiogenic, chemopreventive and antioxidant properties. It exerts cytotoxicity against breast cancer and ovarian cancer cell lines. These properties of Aloin project it as a chemopreventive adjuvant to anticancer chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of concurrent oral administration of Aloin against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. The protective effects of Aloin against DOX-induced toxicity were evident as a statistically significant inhibition of a rise in the biochemical markers of myocardial damage including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB), alanine aminaminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Aloin dose dependently inhibited the DOX-induced changes in ECG like increased ST-height and prolonged QT interval. It protected heart against the lipid peroxidation and restored the levels of antioxidative defenses: reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Aloin prominently reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines– TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, the significant protective effects of Aloin were evident even at the strikingly lower doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg per day. Our results highlight the necessity to further investigate the chemopreventive effects of Aloin against other chemotherapeutic agents.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide–induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As_2O_3)–induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As_2O_3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As_2O_3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As_2O_3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As_2O_3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As_2O_3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide-induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines.
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's archives of pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As2O3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As2O3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As2O3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As2O3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.

Sangeeta Khare – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability.
    Frontiers in microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram+ve and Gram-ve) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus spp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24hr exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 µM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production.

  • Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability
    Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus sp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 μM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production in a dose -dependent manner.HIGHLIGHTS    –Aloin exhibits antibacterial properties for certain intestinal commensal bacteria.    –In rat fecal slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content), longer Aloin exposure (24 h) decreases the butyrate production in dose dependent manner.    –The 16s rRNA sequencing data show that Aloin decreased the abundance of butyrate producing bacterial species.    –Rat intestinal commensal bacteria metabolized Aloin into aloe-emodin.    –Aloin altered the intestinal epithelial cells barrier integrity, however, the metabolic product of Aloin – Aloe-emodin did not alter epithelial cells permeability

  • Image_1_Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability.TIF
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus sp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 μM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production in a dose -dependent manner.HIGHLIGHTS    –Aloin exhibits antibacterial properties for certain intestinal commensal bacteria.    –In rat fecal slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content), longer Aloin exposure (24 h) decreases the butyrate production in dose dependent manner.    –The 16s rRNA sequencing data show that Aloin decreased the abundance of butyrate producing bacterial species.    –Rat intestinal commensal bacteria metabolized Aloin into aloe-emodin.    –Aloin altered the intestinal epithelial cells barrier integrity, however, the metabolic product of Aloin – Aloe-emodin did not alter epithelial cells permeability.

Lalit A. Birari – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aloin alleviates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats by abrogating oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
    Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Shivani Wagh, Banappa S. Unger, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin, an anthraquinone present in the aloe species, possesses antiangiogenic, chemopreventive and antioxidant properties. It exerts cytotoxicity against breast cancer and ovarian cancer cell lines. These properties of Aloin project it as a chemopreventive adjuvant to anticancer chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of concurrent oral administration of Aloin against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. The protective effects of Aloin against DOX-induced toxicity were evident as a statistically significant inhibition of a rise in the biochemical markers of myocardial damage including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Aloin dose dependently inhibited the DOX-induced changes in ECG like increased ST-height and prolonged QT interval. It protected heart against the lipid peroxidation and restored the levels of antioxidative defenses: reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Aloin prominently reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines- TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, the significant protective effects of Aloin were evident even at the strikingly lower doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg per day. Our results highlight the necessity to further investigate the chemopreventive effects of Aloin against other chemotherapeutic agents.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide–induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As_2O_3)–induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As_2O_3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As_2O_3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As_2O_3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As_2O_3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As_2O_3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide-induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines.
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's archives of pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As2O3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As2O3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As2O3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As2O3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.

Kuppan Gokulan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability.
    Frontiers in microbiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram+ve and Gram-ve) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus spp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24hr exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 µM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production.

  • Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability
    Frontiers Media S.A., 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus sp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 μM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production in a dose -dependent manner.HIGHLIGHTS    –Aloin exhibits antibacterial properties for certain intestinal commensal bacteria.    –In rat fecal slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content), longer Aloin exposure (24 h) decreases the butyrate production in dose dependent manner.    –The 16s rRNA sequencing data show that Aloin decreased the abundance of butyrate producing bacterial species.    –Rat intestinal commensal bacteria metabolized Aloin into aloe-emodin.    –Aloin altered the intestinal epithelial cells barrier integrity, however, the metabolic product of Aloin – Aloe-emodin did not alter epithelial cells permeability

  • Image_1_Dose-Dependent Effects of Aloin on the Intestinal Bacterial Community Structure, Short Chain Fatty Acids Metabolism and Intestinal Epithelial Cell Permeability.TIF
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Kuppan Gokulan, Pranav Kolluru, Carl E. Cerniglia, Sangeeta Khare
    Abstract:

    Aloe leaf or purified Aloin products possess numerous therapeutic and pharmaceutical properties. It is widely used as ingredients in a variety of food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Animal studies have shown that consumption of aloe or purified Aloin cause intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia, and malignancy. Here, we tested antibacterial effects of Aloin, against intestinal commensal microbiota. Minimum inhibitory concentration of Aloin for several human commensal bacterial species (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) ranged from 1 to 4 mg/ml. Metabolism studies indicated that Enterococcus faecium was capable of degrading Aloin into aloe-emodin at a slower-rate compared to Eubacterium spp. As a proof of concept, we incubated 3% rat fecal-slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content) with 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml of Aloin to test antimicrobial properties. Low Aloin concentrations showed minor perturbations to intestinal bacteria, whereas high concentration increased Lactobacillus sp. counts. Aloin also decreased butyrate-production in fecal microbiota in a dose-dependent manner after 24 h exposure. The 16S rRNA sequence-data revealed that Aloin decreases the abundance of butyrate-producing bacterial species. Transepithelial resistant result revealed that Aloin alters the intestinal barrier-function at higher concentrations (500 μM). In conclusion, Aloin exhibits antibacterial property for certain commensal bacteria and decreases butyrate-production in a dose -dependent manner.HIGHLIGHTS    –Aloin exhibits antibacterial properties for certain intestinal commensal bacteria.    –In rat fecal slurry (an in vitro model to simulate human colon content), longer Aloin exposure (24 h) decreases the butyrate production in dose dependent manner.    –The 16s rRNA sequencing data show that Aloin decreased the abundance of butyrate producing bacterial species.    –Rat intestinal commensal bacteria metabolized Aloin into aloe-emodin.    –Aloin altered the intestinal epithelial cells barrier integrity, however, the metabolic product of Aloin – Aloe-emodin did not alter epithelial cells permeability.

Shreesh Ojha – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aloin alleviates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats by abrogating oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines.
    Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Shivani Wagh, Banappa S. Unger, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin, an anthraquinone present in the aloe species, possesses antiangiogenic, chemopreventive and antioxidant properties. It exerts cytotoxicity against breast cancer and ovarian cancer cell lines. These properties of Aloin project it as a chemopreventive adjuvant to anticancer chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of concurrent oral administration of Aloin against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. The protective effects of Aloin against DOX-induced toxicity were evident as a statistically significant inhibition of a rise in the biochemical markers of myocardial damage including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Aloin dose dependently inhibited the DOX-induced changes in ECG like increased ST-height and prolonged QT interval. It protected heart against the lipid peroxidation and restored the levels of antioxidative defenses: reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase. Aloin prominently reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines- TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Notably, the significant protective effects of Aloin were evident even at the strikingly lower doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg per day. Our results highlight the necessity to further investigate the chemopreventive effects of Aloin against other chemotherapeutic agents.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide–induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As_2O_3)–induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As_2O_3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As_2O_3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As_2O_3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As_2O_3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As_2O_3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.

  • Aloin protects against arsenic trioxide-induced myocardial membrane damage and release of inflammatory cytokines.
    Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's archives of pharmacology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lalit A. Birari, Umesh B. Mahajan, Kalpesh R. Patil, Dipak D. Patil, Neha A. Bagul, Sateesh Belemkar, Sameer N. Goyal, Shreesh Ojha, Chandragouda R. Patil
    Abstract:

    Aloin exerts concentration-dependent pro-oxidant and antioxidant effects when tested in vitro. Such duality of effects has not been investigated through in vivo studies on Aloin. We evaluated the effects of Aloin at doses ranging between 1 and 125 mg/kg against the arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. As2O3 (5 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administrated for 10 days. Aloin was administered through oral gavage at 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. As2O3 induced rise in ST height and QT interval in ECG, increased oxidative stress, and depleted the antioxidative defense. As2O3 increased inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the heart. Aloin dose dependently inhibited the As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. There was no evidence of increased oxidative stress in the low-dose Aloin-treated mice receiving As2O3. Our results indicate that Aloin possesses cardioprotective potentials and its pro-oxidant effect is not evident in vivo at tested doses.