Alopias - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab


Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Alopias

The Experts below are selected from a list of 879 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Alopias – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Jacob Geleijns – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias superciliosus (UF 160188)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias superciliosus (UF 160188

    Free Register to Access Article

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.111198)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.111198

    Free Register to Access Article

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.116876)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.116876

    Free Register to Access Article

Nicholas C Wegner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • gill morphometrics of the thresher sharks genus Alopias correlation of gill dimensions with aerobic demand and environmental oxygen
    Journal of Morphology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Thomas P Wootton, Nicholas C Wegner, Chugey A Sepulveda

    Abstract:

    Gill morphometrics of the three thresher shark species (genus Alopias) were determined to examine how metabolism and habitat correlate with respiratory specialization for increased gas exchange. Thresher sharks have large gill surface areas, short water-blood barrier distances, and thin lamellae. Their large gill areas are derived from long total filament lengths and large lamellae, a morphometric configuration documented for other active elasmobranchs (i.e., lamnid sharks, Lamnidae) that augments respiratory surface area while limiting increases in branchial resistance to ventilatory flow. The bigeye thresher, Alopias superciliosus, which can experience prolonged exposure to hypoxia during diel vertical migrations, has the largest gill surface area documented for any elasmobranch species studied to date. The pelagic thresher shark, A. pelagicus, a warm-water epi-pelagic species, has a gill surface area comparable to that of the common thresher shark, A. vulpinus, despite the latter’s expected higher aerobic requirements associated with regional endothermy. In addition, A. vulpinus has a significantly longer water-blood barrier distance than A. pelagicus and A. superciliosus, which likely reflects its cold, well-oxygenated habitat relative to the two other Alopias species. In fast-swimming fishes (such as A. vulpinus and A. pelagicus) cranial streamlining may impose morphological constraints on gill size. However, such constraints may be relaxed in hypoxia-dwelling species (such as A. superciliosus) that are likely less dependent on streamlining and can therefore accommodate larger branchial chambers and gills.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • The red muscle morphology of the thresher sharks (family Alopiidae).
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 2005
    Co-Authors: C. A. Sepulveda, Nicholas C Wegner, Diego Bernal, Jeffrey B. Graham

    Abstract:

    SUMMARY A more medial and anterior position of the red aerobic myotomal muscle (RM)
    and the presence of a vascular counter-current heat exchange system provide
    the functional elements that facilitate regional RM endothermy in tunas,
    lamnid sharks and the common thresher shark ( Alopias vulpinus ). The
    convergent RM morphology among all species capable of RM endothermy suggests
    that RM position is a strong predictor of fish endothermic capacity. The
    present study investigated the comparative RM morphology of the other two
    thresher shark species (bigeye thresher, Alopias superciliosus , and
    the pelagic thresher, Alopias pelagicus ), for which there is no
    information regarding their capacity for RM endothermy, and compared these
    data with published works on A. vulpinus . The digitization of
    transverse sections along the body of A. superciliosus and A.
    pelagicus enabled quantification of the relative amount of RM and the
    position and placement of the RM along the body. The RM in both A.
    superciliosus and A. pelagicus is positioned subcutaneously,
    along the lateral edges of the myotomes, and is distributed relatively evenly
    over the trunk of the body. The position of maximum RM area is at 50% fork
    length ( FL ) for A. superciliosus and at 75% FL for
    A. pelagicus . The amount of RM (mean ± s.e.m.) is
    2.31±0.11% and 3.01±0.10% in A. superciliosus and
    A. pelagicus , respectively. When compared with A. vulpinus ,
    all three alopiid sharks have a similar amount of RM. However, A.
    superciliosus and A. pelagicus differ from A. vulpinus
    in that they do not possess the medial and anterior RM arrangement that would
    likely facilitate metabolic heat conservation (RM endothermy).

    Free Register to Access Article

Martin Brazeau – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias superciliosus (UF 160188)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias superciliosus (UF 160188

    Free Register to Access Article

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.111198)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.111198

    Free Register to Access Article

  • 3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.116876)
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Martin Brazeau, Pepijn Kamminga, Paul W. De Bruin, Jacob Geleijns

    Abstract:

    3D reconstruction of the left lower jaw of Alopias vulpinus (ZMA.PISC.116876

    Free Register to Access Article