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Alpha-Carotene

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Elaine W Gunter – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • retinol alpha tocopherol lutein zeaxanthin beta cryptoxanthin lycopene alpha carotene trans beta carotene and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed phase hplc with multiwavelength detection
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.

  • Retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed-phase HPLC with multiwavelength detection.
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.

Anne L Sowell – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Carotenoids, vitamin A and risk of adenomatous polyp recurrence in the polyp prevention trial.
    International Journal of Cancer, 2004
    Co-Authors: Susan Steck-scott, Anne L Sowell, Michele R. Forman, Craig B. Borkowf, Paul S. Albert, Martha L. Slattery, Brenda K. Brewer, Bette J. Caan, Electra D. Paskett, Frank Iber

    Abstract:

    One trial reported beta-carotene supplementation was protective of adenomatous polyp recurrence in nonsmokers. We now examine the relation of serum and dietary carotenoids and vitamin A to adenomatous polyp recurrence in a subcohort of 834 participants in a low fat, high fiber, high fruit and vegetable dietary intervention, the Polyp Prevention Trial. Multivariate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of polyp recurrence were obtained using baseline or the average (first 3 years of the trial) carotenoid and vitamin A values after adjustment for covariates. Compared to the lowest quartile of baseline Alpha-Carotene concentrations, the OR of multiple polyp recurrence for the highest quartile was 0.55 (95% CI = 0.30–0.99) and the OR of right-sided recurrence was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.37–0.95). Baseline dietary intakes of Alpha-Carotene and vitamin A from food with/without supplements were inversely associated with any recurrence (pfor linear trend = 0.03- Alpha-Carotene; p = 0.004 and p = 0.007 -intakes of vitamin A). Compared to the lowest quartile of averaged beta-carotene concentrations, the OR of multiple adenomas for the highest quartile was 0.40 (95% CI = 0.22–0.75) with an inverse trend (p = 0.02). The risk was inversely related to averaged: Alpha-Carotene concentrations and right-sided polyps; Alpha-Carotene intake and recurrence of any, multiple and right-sided polyps; beta-carotene intake and multiple adenoma recurrence; vitamin A from food (with supplements) and each adverse endpoint. Thus, Alpha-Carotene and vitamin A may protect against recurrence in nonsmokers and nondrinkers or be indicative of compliance or another healthy lifestyle factor that reduces risk. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • retinol alpha tocopherol lutein zeaxanthin beta cryptoxanthin lycopene alpha carotene trans beta carotene and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed phase hplc with multiwavelength detection
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.

  • Retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed-phase HPLC with multiwavelength detection.
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.

P R Yeager – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • retinol alpha tocopherol lutein zeaxanthin beta cryptoxanthin lycopene alpha carotene trans beta carotene and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed phase hplc with multiwavelength detection
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.

  • Retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and four retinyl esters in serum determined simultaneously by reversed-phase HPLC with multiwavelength detection.
    Clinical Chemistry, 1994
    Co-Authors: Anne L Sowell, D L Huff, P R Yeager, Samuel P Caudill, Elaine W Gunter

    Abstract:

    We describe the use of HPLC with multiwavelength detection to measure retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, beta-carotene, and the linoleate, oleate, palmitate, and stearate esters of retinol in a single 200-microL serum sample. The method is sensitive enough to detect individual retinyl esters in fasting serum from a nonhyperlipidemic population and requires only 12 min for each sample. Serum concentration ranges and means are reported for retinol, alpha-tocopherol, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, Alpha-Carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and the sum of the retinyl esters from serum analyses of 3480 participants from several different studies.