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Edzard Ernst – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine
    Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Edzard Ernst
    Abstract:

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine can be defined as diagnosis, treatment, and/or prevention which complements mainstream Medicine by contributing to a common whole, by satisfying a demand not met by orthodoxy, or by diversifying the conceptual frameworks of Medicine. It is popular; hence doctors should know about it. The term covers a vast array of treatments and diagnostic techniques which have little in common except that they are not part of mainstream Medicine. The most important modalities are acupuncture, phytotherapy, homeopathy, and spinal manipulation. In industrialized countries, typical users of complementary and Alternative Medicine are middle-aged, female, well-educated members of a high socioeconomic class. Indications range from chronic benign conditions where mainstream Medicine does not offer a cure (e.g. back pain) to life-threatening diseases like cancer and AIDS.

  • The Unattractiveness of Alternative Medicine
    Alternative Medicine, 2019
    Co-Authors: Edzard Ernst
    Abstract:

    The previous chapter, we discussed the reasons that attract consumers to Alternative Medicine. As we have seen, these attractions often turn into the opposite, once we realise that they are unfounded. Attractions can thus turn out to be indirect distractions. In this chapter I will outline several direct reasons for people to be disenchanted with Alternative Medicine.

  • Ethical Problems in Alternative Medicine
    Alternative Medicine, 2019
    Co-Authors: Edzard Ernst
    Abstract:

    Medical ethics are rules that inform us what actions in healthcare are morally right and which might be problematic. They apply to all areas of Medicine, including of course Alternative Medicine. In this chapter, I will focus on those ethical issues which arguably are the most important ones in the context of this book; a full debate of medical ethics in Alternative Medicine can be found elsewhere [https://www.amazon.co.uk/More-Harm-than-Good-Complementary-ebook/dp/B078ZQXQNP/].

Sirkka Lauri – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Oncology nurses’ attitudes towards Alternative Medicine.
    Psycho-oncology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Liisa Salmenperä, Tarja Suominen, Sirkka Lauri
    Abstract:

    : Little is known about nurses’ attitudes towards Alternative Medicine. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes towards Alternative Medicine among nurses working on oncology wards in three university and one central hospital in Finland. The data were collected with a questionnaire specifically developed for this project. The response rate was 68.1% (n = 92). The nurses did not regard Alternative Medicine as a safe and natural method in the treatment of cancer. On the contrary, many nurses believed that Alternative therapies are offered by quack doctors for financial gain. However, the nurses considered it important that cancer patients have the opportunity to talk about their use of Alternative Medicine both with nurses and physicians. Overall the results indicated that nurses’ attitudes are for the most part negative. An interesting question that deserves further attention is whether this attitude is reflected in nursing practice.

Wayne B. Jonas – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the NIH
    Clinics in dermatology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Wayne B. Jonas
    Abstract:

    In 1995, the Office of Alternative Medicine defined complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as “. . . a broad domain of healing resources that encompasses all health systems, modalities, practices and their accompanying theories and beliefs, other that those intrinsic to a the politically dominant health system of a particular society or culture in a given historical period.”1 Other surveys have operationally defined CAM as those practices used for the prevention and treatment of disease that are not taught widely in medical schools, nor generally available in hospitals.2 CAM deals with cross-cutting themes, from molecular biology to preventive and primary health care. CAM practices are both complementary to conventional Medicine and those that are Alternative healthcare options where no conventional approach exists. CAM may involve practices with highly specialized skills and long training and others that are applied simply by the patient. Complementary and Alternative Medicine is that subset of practices not integral to conventional care but still used by patients to supplement that care.

  • The challenge of complementary and Alternative Medicine
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Ronald A. Chez, Wayne B. Jonas
    Abstract:

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine can be defined as those medical systems, practices, interventions, and applications that currently are not part of the dominant or conventional medical system. There are more than 300 different topics under the term complementary and Alternative Medicine that can be divided into seven major categories on the basis of philosophy, approach to the patient, and orientation. Most patients seeking care from complementary and Alternative Medicine providers do so for the relief of signs and symptoms related to chronic illness while they are under the care of a physician. Clinical data derived from appropriately conducted clinical trials support the use and value of complementary and Alternative Medicine for selected indications. The challenge for both conventional Medicine and complementary and Alternative Medicine is to fulfill the role of patient advocate by engaging in reciprocal open communication, facilitating the patient’s informed choice, avoiding harmful or useless practices, and implementing an integrated evidence-based care plan.

W Jonas – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alternative Medicine instruction in medical schools and family practice residency programs
    Family Medicine, 1997
    Co-Authors: M Carlston, M R Stuart, W Jonas
    Abstract:

    Background and objectives The use of medical therapies outside of mainstream Western Medicine, referred to as complementary Medicine or Alternative Medicine (CAM), is rapidly increasing in the United States. Despite evidence of physician interest and willingness to refer to CAM providers, there is currently little information regarding medical education in these practices. This survey assessed the frequency and nature of Alternative Medicine instruction in US medical schools and family practice residency programs. Methods Society of Teachers of Family Medicine staff mailed a 16-question survey to all US medical school family Medicine department chairs and non-university-based family practice residency program directors about existing instruction in Alternative Medicine, planned instruction, and educational programs under consideration. Results The overall response rate was 77.9% (364/467), with 29.7% (108/364) of all respondents currently teaching, 6.0% (22/364) starting to teach, and 6.3% (23/364) considering teaching some form of Alternative Medicine. CAM instruction is most common in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain regions. The instruction is predominantly elective (72.2%). Instructional content and methodologies vary widely. Conclusions Alternative Medicine has begun to establish a presence in US medical schools and family practice residency programs. Offerings in this diverse subject vary widely in content and format.

Liisa Salmenperä – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Oncology nurses’ attitudes towards Alternative Medicine.
    Psycho-oncology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Liisa Salmenperä, Tarja Suominen, Sirkka Lauri
    Abstract:

    : Little is known about nurses’ attitudes towards Alternative Medicine. The purpose of this study was to describe attitudes towards Alternative Medicine among nurses working on oncology wards in three university and one central hospital in Finland. The data were collected with a questionnaire specifically developed for this project. The response rate was 68.1% (n = 92). The nurses did not regard Alternative Medicine as a safe and natural method in the treatment of cancer. On the contrary, many nurses believed that Alternative therapies are offered by quack doctors for financial gain. However, the nurses considered it important that cancer patients have the opportunity to talk about their use of Alternative Medicine both with nurses and physicians. Overall the results indicated that nurses’ attitudes are for the most part negative. An interesting question that deserves further attention is whether this attitude is reflected in nursing practice.