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Aluminum Cladding

The Experts below are selected from a list of 123 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Barry H. Rabin – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic Aluminum clad uranium–10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly
    Journal of Nuclear Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: D.w. Brown, Maria A Okuniewski, Jonathan D. Almer, Levente Balogh, Bjorn Clausen, John S. Okasinski, Barry H. Rabin

    Abstract:

    Abstract Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, Aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U–10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U–10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U–10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly −250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and −140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the Aluminum Cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the Aluminum Cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U–10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size.

  • High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic Aluminum clad uranium-10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly
    Journal of Nuclear Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: D.w. Brown, Maria A Okuniewski, Jonathan D. Almer, Levente Balogh, Bjorn Clausen, John S. Okasinski, Barry H. Rabin

    Abstract:

    Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, Aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U-10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U-10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly -250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and -140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the Aluminum Cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the Aluminum Cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U-10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Mathieu Perton, Daniel Levesque, Jean-pierre Monchalin, M Lord, James A Smith, Barry H. Rabin

    Abstract:

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an Aluminum Cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

D.w. Brown – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic Aluminum clad uranium–10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly
    Journal of Nuclear Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: D.w. Brown, Maria A Okuniewski, Jonathan D. Almer, Levente Balogh, Bjorn Clausen, John S. Okasinski, Barry H. Rabin

    Abstract:

    Abstract Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, Aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U–10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U–10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U–10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly −250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and −140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the Aluminum Cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the Aluminum Cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U–10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size.

  • High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic Aluminum clad uranium-10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly
    Journal of Nuclear Materials, 2013
    Co-Authors: D.w. Brown, Maria A Okuniewski, Jonathan D. Almer, Levente Balogh, Bjorn Clausen, John S. Okasinski, Barry H. Rabin

    Abstract:

    Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, Aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U-10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U-10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly -250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and -140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the Aluminum Cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the Aluminum Cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U-10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Zhang Sen-ming – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Analysis and comparison of steel tube OPGW and Aluminum Cladding steel tube OPGW
    Telecommunications for Electric Power System, 2020
    Co-Authors: Zhang Sen-ming

    Abstract:

    At present, domestic made OPGW is mainly steel structure. It will cause difficulty when making the selection for smaller cross-sectional area or diameter and bigger short-circuits OPGW. By analyzing and comparing the structure characteristics and relevant parameters between steel tube type OPGW and Aluminum Cladding steel tube type OPGW, this paper finds out that Aluminum Cladding steel tube structure OPGW is a good supplement to the steel tube structure OPGW in the regions where the steel tube structure OPGW is not suitable, but for OPGW with enough large diameter, cross-section area and outer layer wire diameter, the Aluminum Cladding steel tube structure OPGW does not have advantages.