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Aminosilicones

The Experts below are selected from a list of 177 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Robert James Perry – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Measurement of CO2 Diffusivity in Phase-Changing Aminosilicone CO2 Capture Solvent
    Energy & Fuels, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard Westendorf, Benjamin Rue Wood, Robert James Perry, Rachel L Farnum, Robert M Enick, Gosia Rubinsztajn, John Brian Mcdermott, Deepak Tapriyal

    Abstract:

    The mass transfer performance of a phase-changing aminosilicone CO2 post-combustion capture absorbent has been characterized. The aminosilicone, 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (GAP-0), rapidly transforms from a low-viscosity liquid into a friable solid upon exposure to gaseous CO2. Mass transfer performance of this absorbent was studied to inform design and scaleup of a CO2 capture process. The long-term mass transfer rate of CO2 gas through a solid GAP-0 carbamate salt layer into a quiescent pool of liquid GAP-0 was characterized using pressurized thermogravimetric analysis. This experiment led to an estimate of the CO2 permeability of the carbamate salt solid of 1.46 × 10–9 mol of CO2 m–1 s–1 atm–1. Given literature-reported values of CO2 solubility in silicone polymers, the CO2 diffusivity through GAP-0 carbamate salt was inferred to be approximately 4.39 × 10–11 m2/s. In parallel, the CO2 absorption rate into a spray of GAP-0 droplets was studied in a laboratory spray reactor. Wh…

  • second generation Aminosilicones as co2 capture solvents
    Energy & Fuels, 2017
    Co-Authors: Robert James Perry

    Abstract:

    Silicones with a variety of linear, branched, star, and cyclic architectures were synthesized that contained electron-donating ethylaminopropyl groups attached to the silicone core. These solvents were tested for CO2 uptake and their physical state after reaction. In comparison to analogous materials that only possessed a primary amine, all of the heteroatom-substituted derivatives displayed excellent CO2 uptake and all maintained a liquid, flowable state after reaction. Optimal CO2 uptake was achieved at ambient temperatures rather than the typical 40 °C level. This was likely due to the lower heats of reaction for the secondary amine structure. β-Isomer present in the samples did not adversely affect the reaction with CO2 or the ability to remain in a liquid state upon complete reaction.

  • Measuring CO2 and N2O Mass Transfer into GAP-1 CO2–Capture Solvents at Varied Water Loadings
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Greg A. Whyatt, Benjamin Rue Wood, Irina Spiry, Robert James Perry, Andy Zwoster, Feng Zheng, Charles J. Freeman, David J. Heldebrant

    Abstract:

    This paper investigates the CO2 and N2O absorption behavior in the water-lean gamma amino propyl (GAP)-1/TEG solvent system using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed on a blend of GAP-1 aminosilicone in triethylene glycol at varied water loadings in the solvent. Measurements were made with CO2 and N2O at representative lean (0.04 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), middle (0.13 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), and rich (0.46 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) solvent loadings at 0, 5, 10, and 15 wt % water loadings at 40, 60, and 80 °C and N2O at (0.08–0.09 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) at 5 wt % water at 40, 60, and 80 °C. CO2 flux was found to be nonlinear with respect to log mean pressure driving force (LMPD). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (k′g) were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance (determined from a correlation from literature) from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting k′g values for CO2 and N2O in GAP-1/TEG mixtures were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous monoethanolamine u…

Benjamin Rue Wood – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Measurement of CO2 Diffusivity in Phase-Changing Aminosilicone CO2 Capture Solvent
    Energy & Fuels, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard Westendorf, Benjamin Rue Wood, Robert James Perry, Rachel L Farnum, Robert M Enick, Gosia Rubinsztajn, John Brian Mcdermott, Deepak Tapriyal

    Abstract:

    The mass transfer performance of a phase-changing aminosilicone CO2 post-combustion capture absorbent has been characterized. The aminosilicone, 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (GAP-0), rapidly transforms from a low-viscosity liquid into a friable solid upon exposure to gaseous CO2. Mass transfer performance of this absorbent was studied to inform design and scaleup of a CO2 capture process. The long-term mass transfer rate of CO2 gas through a solid GAP-0 carbamate salt layer into a quiescent pool of liquid GAP-0 was characterized using pressurized thermogravimetric analysis. This experiment led to an estimate of the CO2 permeability of the carbamate salt solid of 1.46 × 10–9 mol of CO2 m–1 s–1 atm–1. Given literature-reported values of CO2 solubility in silicone polymers, the CO2 diffusivity through GAP-0 carbamate salt was inferred to be approximately 4.39 × 10–11 m2/s. In parallel, the CO2 absorption rate into a spray of GAP-0 droplets was studied in a laboratory spray reactor. Wh…

  • Measuring CO2 and N2O Mass Transfer into GAP-1 CO2–Capture Solvents at Varied Water Loadings
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Greg A. Whyatt, Benjamin Rue Wood, Irina Spiry, Robert James Perry, Andy Zwoster, Feng Zheng, Charles J. Freeman, David J. Heldebrant

    Abstract:

    This paper investigates the CO2 and N2O absorption behavior in the water-lean gamma amino propyl (GAP)-1/TEG solvent system using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed on a blend of GAP-1 aminosilicone in triethylene glycol at varied water loadings in the solvent. Measurements were made with CO2 and N2O at representative lean (0.04 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), middle (0.13 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), and rich (0.46 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) solvent loadings at 0, 5, 10, and 15 wt % water loadings at 40, 60, and 80 °C and N2O at (0.08–0.09 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) at 5 wt % water at 40, 60, and 80 °C. CO2 flux was found to be nonlinear with respect to log mean pressure driving force (LMPD). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (k′g) were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance (determined from a correlation from literature) from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting k′g values for CO2 and N2O in GAP-1/TEG mixtures were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous monoethanolamine u…

  • Thermal Degradation of Aminosilicone Carbamates
    Energy & Fuels, 2016
    Co-Authors: Robert James Perry, Benjamin Rue Wood, Matthew P. Rainka, Mark D. Doherty, Omkar Namjoshi, Daniel Hatchell, Gary T. Rochelle

    Abstract:

    The major thermal degradation pathway seen with 1,5-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,1,3,3,5,5-hexamethyltrisiloxane/triethylene glycol (GAP-1/TEG) is the formation of a urea-containing compound. Degradation is increased at higher temperatures, longer reaction times, higher CO2 concentrations (in the form of carbamate loading), and low water levels. A judicious choice of operating conditions can significantly decrease urea byproduct formation. Reducing the desorption temperature from 140 to 100 °C and adding 5 wt % water to the 60:40 mixture of GAP-1/TEG resulted in a 500-fold reduction in amine loss after 4 days in a CO2-rich environment. After 56 days of continuous heating under the same conditions, ∼87% original GAP-1 was retained at 100 °C compared to only ∼20% at 140 °C. The urea byproduct appears to be the only major degradation pathway under these conditions, with 100% of the mass balance accounted for by the urea and amine components.

Irina Spiry – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Measuring CO2 and N2O Mass Transfer into GAP-1 CO2–Capture Solvents at Varied Water Loadings
    Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Greg A. Whyatt, Benjamin Rue Wood, Irina Spiry, Robert James Perry, Andy Zwoster, Feng Zheng, Charles J. Freeman, David J. Heldebrant

    Abstract:

    This paper investigates the CO2 and N2O absorption behavior in the water-lean gamma amino propyl (GAP)-1/TEG solvent system using a wetted-wall contactor. Testing was performed on a blend of GAP-1 aminosilicone in triethylene glycol at varied water loadings in the solvent. Measurements were made with CO2 and N2O at representative lean (0.04 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), middle (0.13 mol CO2/mol alkalinity), and rich (0.46 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) solvent loadings at 0, 5, 10, and 15 wt % water loadings at 40, 60, and 80 °C and N2O at (0.08–0.09 mol CO2/mol alkalinity) at 5 wt % water at 40, 60, and 80 °C. CO2 flux was found to be nonlinear with respect to log mean pressure driving force (LMPD). Liquid-film mass transfer coefficients (k′g) were calculated by subtracting the gas film resistance (determined from a correlation from literature) from the overall mass transfer measurement. The resulting k′g values for CO2 and N2O in GAP-1/TEG mixtures were found to be higher than that of 5 M aqueous monoethanolamine u…

  • Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent
    , 2015
    Co-Authors: Tiffany Elizabeth Pinard Westendorf, Irina Spiry, Robert James Perry, Joel Caraher, Wei Chen, Rachael Farnum, Paul Wilson, Benjamin Rue Wood

    Abstract:

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of

  • Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Surinder Prabhjot Singh, Benjamin Rue Wood, Irina Spiry, Dan Hancu, Wei Chen

    Abstract:

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations aremore » summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.« less