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Amygdalofugal Pathway

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Jennifer M. Swann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the syrian hamster : Subnuclei and connections of the posterior division
    Neuroscience, 2005
    Co-Authors: Ruth I. Wood, Jennifer M. Swann

    Abstract:

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is a key part of a ring of cells extending between the centromedial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis referred to as the extended amygdala. The present study describes the architecture of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the connections of subnuclei in posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The hamster bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is readily allotted to anterior and posterior divisions separated by the fibers of the body of the anterior commissure. The anterior division has four subnuclei: anteromedial, anterointermediate, anterolateral, and anteroventral. Within the posterior division, there are three distinct regions: posteromedial, posterointermediate, and posterolateral. In hamsters, the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis contributes to male sexual behavior, particularly chemoinvestigation. Moreover, the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is part of a neural circuit essential for mating, including the medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area. The connections of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part were visualized by co-injection of anterograde (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin) and retrograde (cholera toxin B) tract tracers. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part have dense bidirectional connections with medial amygdaloid nucleus and cortical amygdala via the stria terminalis and ventral Amygdalofugal Pathway. These subnuclei also maintain bidirectional connections with steroid-concentrating areas including lateral septum, medial preoptic area, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part receive projections from the subiculum and send projections to deep mesencephalic nuclei. By contrast, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part is connected with the central amygdala, lateral hypothalamus, subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, substantia innominata, substantia nigra and thalamus. Thus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part have similar connections with areas involved in social behaviors. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part maintains connections with areas involved in motivational circuits. This supports the concept of distinct circuits within the extended amygdala which differentially link the centromedial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

Olivier George – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Inactivation of a CRF-dependent Amygdalofugal Pathway reverses addiction-like behaviors in alcohol-dependent rats
    Nature Communications, 2019
    Co-Authors: Giordano De Guglielmo, Marsida Kallupi, Matthew B. Pomrenze, Elena Crawford, Sierra Simpson, Paul Schweitzer, George F. Koob, Robert O. Messing, Olivier George

    Abstract:

    Withdrawal from alcohol activates neurons in the central amygdala (CeA) and increases craving for alcohol. The authors show that these neurons predominantly express CRF and project to the BNST. Inactivation of this Pathway reduces the dependence-related escalation of alcohol drinking. The activation of a neuronal ensemble in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) during alcohol withdrawal has been hypothesized to induce high levels of alcohol drinking in dependent rats. In the present study we describe that the CeA neuronal ensemble that is activated by withdrawal from chronic alcohol exposure contains ~80% corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons and that the optogenetic inactivation of these CeA CRF+ neurons prevents recruitment of the neuronal ensemble, decreases the escalation of alcohol drinking, and decreases the intensity of somatic signs of withdrawal. Optogenetic dissection of the downstream neuronal Pathways demonstrates that the reversal of addiction-like behaviors is observed after the inhibition of CeA CRF projections to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and that inhibition of the CRF^CeA-BNST Pathway is mediated by inhibition of the CRF-CRF_1 system and inhibition of BNST cell firing. These results suggest that the CRF^CeA-BNST Pathway could be targeted for the treatment of excessive drinking in alcohol use disorder.

  • Inactivation of a CRF-dependent Amygdalofugal Pathway reverses addiction-like behaviors in alcohol-dependent rats
    Nature communications, 2019
    Co-Authors: Giordano De Guglielmo, Marsida Kallupi, Matthew B. Pomrenze, Elena Crawford, Sierra Simpson, Paul Schweitzer, George F. Koob, Robert O. Messing, Olivier George

    Abstract:

    The activation of a neuronal ensemble in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) during alcohol withdrawal has been hypothesized to induce high levels of alcohol drinking in dependent rats. In the present study we describe that the CeA neuronal ensemble that is activated by withdrawal from chronic alcohol exposure contains ~80% corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons and that the optogenetic inactivation of these CeA CRF+ neurons prevents recruitment of the neuronal ensemble, decreases the escalation of alcohol drinking, and decreases the intensity of somatic signs of withdrawal. Optogenetic dissection of the downstream neuronal Pathways demonstrates that the reversal of addiction-like behaviors is observed after the inhibition of CeA CRF projections to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and that inhibition of the CRFCeA-BNST Pathway is mediated by inhibition of the CRF-CRF1 system and inhibition of BNST cell firing. These results suggest that the CRFCeA-BNST Pathway could be targeted for the treatment of excessive drinking in alcohol use disorder.

Ruth I. Wood – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the syrian hamster : Subnuclei and connections of the posterior division
    Neuroscience, 2005
    Co-Authors: Ruth I. Wood, Jennifer M. Swann

    Abstract:

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is a key part of a ring of cells extending between the centromedial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis referred to as the extended amygdala. The present study describes the architecture of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the connections of subnuclei in posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. The hamster bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is readily allotted to anterior and posterior divisions separated by the fibers of the body of the anterior commissure. The anterior division has four subnuclei: anteromedial, anterointermediate, anterolateral, and anteroventral. Within the posterior division, there are three distinct regions: posteromedial, posterointermediate, and posterolateral. In hamsters, the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis contributes to male sexual behavior, particularly chemoinvestigation. Moreover, the posterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis is part of a neural circuit essential for mating, including the medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area. The connections of bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part were visualized by co-injection of anterograde (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin) and retrograde (cholera toxin B) tract tracers. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part have dense bidirectional connections with medial amygdaloid nucleus and cortical amygdala via the stria terminalis and ventral Amygdalofugal Pathway. These subnuclei also maintain bidirectional connections with steroid-concentrating areas including lateral septum, medial preoptic area, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part receive projections from the subiculum and send projections to deep mesencephalic nuclei. By contrast, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part is connected with the central amygdala, lateral hypothalamus, subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, substantia innominata, substantia nigra and thalamus. Thus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterointermediate part and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posteromedial part have similar connections with areas involved in social behaviors. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, posterolateral part maintains connections with areas involved in motivational circuits. This supports the concept of distinct circuits within the extended amygdala which differentially link the centromedial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

  • Nitric oxide synthase in mating behavior circuitry of male Syrian hamster brain.
    Journal of neurobiology, 1996
    Co-Authors: Yukiharu Hadeishi, Ruth I. Wood

    Abstract:

    Chemosensory and hormonal stimuli are essential for mating in the male Syrian hamster. These signals are processed in a neural circuit that includes the medial amygdaloid nucleus (Me), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and medial preoptic area (MPOA). Nitric oxide is implicated in the regulation of male sexual behavior, and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide, is present in the limbic system. In this study, the distribution of NOS-containing neurons in mating behavior circuitry of the male Syrian hamster brain was determined using labeling for brain NOS (bNOS) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d). bNOS and NADPH-d labeled equivalent populations of neurons. NOS-containing neurons were clustered in specific subnuclei within the Me, BNST, and MPOA. NOS-positive fibers and neurons were seen in the stria terminalis and ventral Amygdalofugal Pathway, which link the Me with BNST and MPOA. Many NOS-positive neurons in the posterior subdivision of the Me, the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN), and the ventral premammillary nucleus contain androgen receptors. Castration reduced NOS-positive neurons in the MPN, implying a selective regulation of NOS by gonadal steroids. Together, these results suggest that NOS may contribute to the regulation of male sexual behavior by influencing the central neural processing of hormonal and chemosensory signals in the hamster limbic system. © 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.