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Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation

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Guibing Zhu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • An overlooked nitrogen loss linked to Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in estuarine sediments in China
    Journal of Soils and Sediments, 2017
    Co-Authors: Xiao-ru Yang, Bo-sen Weng, Christopher W. Marshall, Yongshan Chen, Guibing Zhu, Yong-guan Zhu
    Abstract:

    Purpose Despite its importance, anammox (Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation) in estuarine sediment systems remains poorly understood, particularly at the continental scale. This study aimed to understand the abundance, diversity, and activity of anammox bacteria and to determine the main factors influencing the anammox process in estuarine sediments in China. Materials and methods Estuarine sediments were collected from 18 estuaries spanning over 4000 km. Experiments using an 15N–tracer, quantitative PCR, and clone library construction were used to determine the activity, abundance, and diversity of anammox bacteria. The impact of environmental factors on anammox processes was also determined.

  • Nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils.
    Scientific reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA &hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5-67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m-2 d-1), with anammox activities of 0.005-0.74 nmolN g-1 soil h-1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75-1.4 × 107 copies g-1 soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all

  • nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils
    Scientific Reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA & hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5–67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m−2d−1), with anammox activities of 0.005–0.74 nmolN g−1soil h−1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107copies g−1soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all <103copies g−1soil. We suggest that the subsurface provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria whose contribution to N cycling and groundwater nitrate removal seems considerably larger than previously known.

Ren-cun Jin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Role and application of quorum sensing in Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) process: A review
    Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Quan Zhang, Nian-si Fan, Bao-cheng Huang, Ren-cun Jin
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is a promising biological nitrogen removal process, due to its advantages of high efficiency and low cost. However, problems remain in the application, such a…

  • The short- and long-term effects of Mn2+ on biogranule-based Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox)
    Bioresource technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Zheng-zhe Zhang, Qian-qian Chen, Ji Zhengquan, Zhu Yinghong, Ren-cun Jin
    Abstract:

    Abstract The short- and long-term effects of Mn2+ on the performance of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) granules were investigated in the present study. Anammox activity was determined at various Mn2+ concentrations in batch assays, and the 50% inhibition concentration value was determined to be 7.33 mg L−1. However, no obvious deterioration of reactor performance was observed during the 150-day continuous-flow operation, and the nitrogen removal efficiency of the test reactor (R1) fluctuated between 91% and 92% as the Mn2+ concentration was increased from 1 to 200 mg L−1. Additionally, the specific anammox activity, heme c content and the amounts of extracellular polymeric substances in the anammox biomass increased and then subsequently decreased. The results demonstrated that short-term exposure to Mn2+ has a negative effect on anammox biomass, but the biomass could tolerate Mn2+ stress after acclimation to a high concentration of 200 mg L−1 at the end of the continuous-flow experiment.

  • Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) under realistic seasonal temperature variations: Characteristics of biogranules and process performance.
    Bioresource technology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Qiong Guo, Bao-shan Xing, Chen-chen Yang, Ren-cun Jin
    Abstract:

    In this study, the effects of realistic seasonal temperatures on the nitrogen removal performance of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) and the properties of the anammox granules were comparatively investigated for 330 days. The results demonstrated that the nitrogen removal efficiency (NRE), nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and nitrogen removal rate (NRR) were decreased dramatically, as the temperature decreased from 31.2 to 2.5 °C. However, the nitrogen removal performance recovered andante as the temperature increased gradually. After low temperature exposure, the settleability tended to worsen, and granules appeared to be more irregular with a smaller average granule diameter, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content increased slightly, while the specific anammox activity (SAA) decreased obviously. This realistic seasonal temperatures based research was an illation of the actual operation, and could be potentially implemented to maintain stability for the application of anammox technology.

Mike S. M. Jetten – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils.
    Scientific reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA &hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5-67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m-2 d-1), with anammox activities of 0.005-0.74 nmolN g-1 soil h-1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75-1.4 × 107 copies g-1 soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all

  • nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils
    Scientific Reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA & hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5–67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m−2d−1), with anammox activities of 0.005–0.74 nmolN g−1soil h−1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107copies g−1soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all <103copies g−1soil. We suggest that the subsurface provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria whose contribution to N cycling and groundwater nitrate removal seems considerably larger than previously known.

  • Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in an estuarine sediment
    Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 2004
    Co-Authors: Nils Risgaard-petersen, Mike S. M. Jetten, Markus Schmid, Rikke Louise Meyer, Alex Enrich-prast, Søren Rysgaard, Niels Peter Revsbech
    Abstract:

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24% of N2 pro- duction in Randers Fjord sediment, whereas no indication was seen of the process in sediment from Nors- minde Fjord. It is suggested that the presence of anammox in Randers Fjord and its absence from Nors- minde Fjord is associated with differences in the availability of NO3 – + NO2 – (NOx – ) in the suboxic zone of the sediment. In Randers Fjord, NOx – is present in the water column throughout the year and NOx – porewater profiles showed that NOx – penetrates into the suboxic zone of the sediment. In Norsminde Fjord, NOx – is absent from the water column during the summer months and, via assimilation, benthic mi- croalgae may prevent penetration of NOx – into the suboxic zone of the sediment. Volume-specific anam- mox rates in Randers Fjord were comparable with rates measured previously in Skagerrak sediment by other investigators, but denitrification rates were 10 to 15 times higher. Thus, anammox contributes less to N2 production in Randers Fjord than in Skagerrak sediment. We propose that the lower contribution of anammox in Randers Fjord is linked to the higher availability of easily accessible carbon, which sup- ports a higher population of denitrifying bacteria. Amplification of DNA extracted from the sediment sam- ples from Randers Fjord using planctomycete-specific primers yielded 16S rRNA gene sequences closely related to candidatus Scalindua sorokinii found in the Black Sea by other investigators. The present study thus confirms the link between the presence of bacteria affiliated with candidatus S. sorokinii and the anammox reaction in marine environments. Anammox rates in sediment with intact chemical gradients were estimated using both 15 N and microsensor techniques. Anammox rates estimated with microsensors were less than 22% of the rates measured with isotopes. It is suggested that this discrepancy was due to the presence of fauna, because the applied 15 N technique captures total N2 production while the micro- sensor technique only captures diffusion-controlled N2 production at the sediment surface. This hypo- thesis was verified by consistent agreement between the methods when applied to defaunated sediments.

Shanyun Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils.
    Scientific reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA &hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5-67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m-2 d-1), with anammox activities of 0.005-0.74 nmolN g-1 soil h-1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75-1.4 × 107 copies g-1 soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all

  • nitrogen loss by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils
    Scientific Reports, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shanyun Wang, Mike S. M. Jetten, Dirk Radny, Shuangbing Huang, Linjie Zhuang, Siyan Zhao, Michael Berg, Guibing Zhu
    Abstract:

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA & hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5–67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m−2d−1), with anammox activities of 0.005–0.74 nmolN g−1soil h−1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107copies g−1soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all <103copies g−1soil. We suggest that the subsurface provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria whose contribution to N cycling and groundwater nitrate removal seems considerably larger than previously known.

  • hotspots of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation at land freshwater interfaces
    Nature Geoscience, 2013
    Co-Authors: Guibing Zhu, Shanyun Wang, Weidong Wang, Yu Wang, Leiliu Zhou, Bo Jiang, Huub Op Den J M Camp, Nils Risgaardpetersen, Lorenz Schwark
    Abstract:

    Anammox, Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation, accounts for over 50% of nitrogen loss in marine ecosystems. A field study in north China reveals hotspots of anammox activity in sediments sampled from land–lake interfaces.

Lushen Zuo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Nitrogen Removal Efficiency for Pharmaceutical Wastewater with a Single-Stage Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Process.
    International journal of environmental research and public health, 2020
    Co-Authors: Lushen Zuo, Hong Yao, Liru Fan, Fangxu Jia
    Abstract:

    A single-stage Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) process with an integrated biofilmactivated sludge system was carried out in a laboratory-scale flow-through reactor (volume = 57.6 L) to treat pharmaceutical wastewater containing chlortetracycline. Partial nitrification was successfully achieved after 48 days of treatment with a nitrite accumulation of 70%. The activity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased when the chemical oxygoxygen demand (COD) concentration of the influent was 3000 mg/L. When switching to the single-stage ANAMMOX operation, (T = 32–34 °C, DO = 0.4–0.8 mg/L, pH = 8.0–8.5), the total nitrogen (TN) removal loading rate and efficiency were 1.0 kg/m3/d and 75.2%, respectively, when the Ammonium concentration of the influent was 287 ± 146 mg/L for 73 days. The findings of this study imply that single-stage ANAMMOX can achieve high nitrogen removal rates and effectively treat pharmaceutical wastewater with high concentrations of COD (1000 mg/L) and Ammonium.

  • Feasibility of conventional and single-stage Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation processes for treating chlortetracycline wastewater.
    Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research, 2014
    Co-Authors: Liu Miaomiao, Hong Yao, Hao Liu, Lushen Zuo
    Abstract:

    Conventional and single-stage Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) was carried out in bench-scale reactors to treat chlortetracycline (CTC) wastewater. The total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency and rate for conventional ANAMMOX was 66.6 ± 5.9% and 2.7 ± 0.2 kg N/(m³·d), respectively, which was 58.6 ± 3.8% and 1.2 ± 0.1 kg N/(m³·d) for single-stage ANAMMOX. Single-stage ANAMMOX showed higher tolerance to CTC than conventional ANAMMOX. The nitrogen removal of conventional and single-stage ANAMMOX began to deteriorate when CTC was added, to 40 and 80 mg/L, respectively, with the former totally inhibited at 120 mg/L CTC and the latter at 140 mg/L CTC. TN removal rates were recovered to 1.2 and 0.7 kg N/(m³·d), respectively, when CTC concentration was reduced to 20 mg/L for 8 days. This study implied that ANAMMOX could be efficiently used to treat pharmaceutical wastewater, with single-stage implementation being more stable under antibiotic pressure.