Anagyrine - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Anagyrine

The Experts below are selected from a list of 231 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Anagyrine – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Dale R Gardner – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The serum concentrations of lupine alkaloids in orally-dosed Holstein cattle.
    Research in veterinary science, 2015
    Co-Authors: Benedict T Green, Kevin D Welch, Dale R Gardner, Stephen T. Lee, Bryan L. Stegelmeier, T. Zane Davis
    Abstract:

    Teratogenic alkaloid-containing Lupinus spp. cause congenital defects known as crooked calf disease that is periodically economically devastating for the cattle industry. Previous research indicates that cattle breeds may eliminate plant toxins differently, potentially altering their susceptibility. The objective of this study was to describe the toxicokinetics in Holsteins of Anagyrine, the teratogenic lupine alkaloid that produces crooked calf disease. Other alkaloids including lupanine, an unidentified alkaloid and 5,6-dehydrolupanine were also evaluated. Dried ground Lupinus leucophyllus was orally dosed to four Holstein steers and blood samples were collected for 96 h, analyzed for serum alkaloid concentrations and toxicokinetic parameters calculated. The serum elimination of Anagyrine in Holstein steers was faster than those reported for beef breeds. This suggests that Holsteins may be less susceptible to lupine-induced crooked calf disease. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and to verify if there is a breed difference in disease incidence or severity.

  • Alkaloid profiles of Dermatophyllum arizonicum, Dermatophyllum gypsophilum, Dermatophyllum secundiflorum, Styphnolobium affine, and Styphnolobium japonicum previously classified as Sophora species
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen T. Lee, Daniel Cook, T. Zane Davis, Russell J. Molyneux, Dale R Gardner
    Abstract:

    Abstract Sophora arizonica , Sophora gypsophila , Sophora secundiflora , Sophora affinis , and Sophora japonica were recently reclassified as Dermatophyllum arizonicum , Dermatophyllum gypsophilum , Dermatophyllum secundiflorum , Styphnolobium affine , and Styphnolobium japonicum , respectively. Some legumes of the sub family Papilionoideae including Sophora species are reported to contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids. The quinolizidine alkaloid profiles of D. arizonicum , D. gypsophilum , D. secundiflorum , S. affine , and S. japonicum were investigated qualitatively and quantitatively using field collections and herbarium specimens throughout their range of geographical distribution for the native species. This is the first report of the alkaloid profiles of D. arizonicum and D. gypsophilum . Alkaloid profiles of the other species were compared to previous reports. The Dermatophyllum species contain quinolizidine alkaloids, and the teratogen Anagyrine ( 11 ), while the Styphnolobium species do not contain quinolizidine alkaloids. The chemotaxonomic data are consistent with the reclassification of each species.

  • The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen T. Lee, Daniel Cook, Clinton A Stonecipher, Russell J. Molyneux, Clairton Marcolongo-pereira, Dale R Gardner
    Abstract:

    Abstract Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous species occur in North America, Sophora stenophylla and Sophora nuttalliana . The quinolizidine alkaloid composition of these two species was investigated throughout their geographical distribution using field collections and herbarium specimens. Both species contain quinolizidine alkaloids, and S. nuttalliana contains the teratogen Anagyrine. Lastly, neither species contains the neurotoxin swainsonine as implied by the common name “white loco” for S. nuttalliana .

Kip E. Panter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Phylogenetic examination of two chemotypes of Lupinus leucophyllus
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ivan W. Mott, Daniel Cook, Clinton A Stonecipher, Kip E. Panter
    Abstract:

    Lupines (Lupinus spp.) are a common legume found on western U.S. rangelands. Lupinus spp. may contain quinolizidine and/or piperidine alkaloids that can be toxic and/or teratogenic to grazing livestock. Lupinus leucophyllus and Lupinus polyphyllus in particular represent important species in the rangelands of southeast Washington and northeast Oregon. The objectives of this study were to identify the alkaloid profiles of these two species, and to explore the phylogenetic relationship among the different populations using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Two chemotypes were found among the 14 accessions of Lupinus leucophyllyus. Chemotype A contained Anagyrine, a potent teratogen in cattle, and thus would pose a risk to cause crooked calf syndrome in grazing cattle, while Chemotype B did not contain Anagyrine and poses no teratogenic risk. No alkaloids were detected in the L. polyphyllus plants collected in this area. Phylogenetic analysis showed that L. leucophyllus accessions with the same chemotype that were geographically proximal were closely grouped in the cladogram; however, accessions that were geographically proximal that represented different chemotypes did not cluster together. Taken together, these results suggest that for the studied species, chemotype is the principle factor in determining relatedness followed by geography.

  • Detection of swainsonine and isolation of the endophyte Undifilum from the major locoweeds in Inner Mongolia
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Xinlei Gao, Kip E. Panter, Daniel Cook, Michael H. Ralphs, Ling Yan, Dale R Gardner, Stephen T. Lee, Bing Han, Meng-li Zhao
    Abstract:

    Abstract Locoweeds are Astragalus and Oxytropis species that contain the toxic alkaloid swainsonine, causing widespread poisoning of livestock in Inner Mongolia. Taxa ( Astragalus , Oxytropis , Sphaerophysa , and Sophora species) suspected of causing locoism and/or poisoning in Inner Mongolia were surveyed for swainsonine and Undifilum , the fungal endophyte responsible for the production of swainsonine. Swainsonine was detected at concentrations greater than 0.01% in Astragalus variabilis and Oxytropis glabra . The endophyte Undifilum was detected by culturing and PCR in samples containing swainsonine concentrations greater than 0.01%. In some specimens of A. variabilis and O. glabra swainsonine was not detected or concentrations were less than 0.01%. In these samples the endophyte could not be cultured, but was detected by PCR. Additionally, contrary to previous reports the quinolizidine alkaloids, thermopsine, Anagyrine, and lupanine, were not detected in O. glabra and Oxytropis ochrocephala , however the quinolizidine alkaloids, sophoridine, sophocarpine, and sophoramine were detected in Sophora alopecuroides as previously reported.

  • Velvet Lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus) Population Cycles with Precipitation
    Western North American Naturalist, 2011
    Co-Authors: Michael H. Ralphs, Ernie S. Motteram, Kip E. Panter
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT. Velvet lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus Dougl. ex Lindl) contains the teratogenic alkaloid Anagyrine that causes a crooked calf syndrome. An outbreak of crooked calves occurred in the Channeled Scabland region of eastern Washington in 1997 following 2 years of above-average precipitation. Following this catastrophic loss, we began studies to track velvet lupine density and relate its population cycle to precipitation. In the first study, five 1-m2 quadrats were systematically placed in dense lupine patches at each of 5 locations throughout the scabland region. The quadrats were permanently marked and the number of seedlings and established mature plants were counted biweekly or monthly through the growing seasons of 2001–2005. In the second study, four 1 × 30-m belt transects were established at each of 3 additional locations in the scabland region. The number of seedlings and mature lupine plants were counted within these transects in June or July each year from 2002 to 2009. A third study was cond…

Stephen T. Lee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The serum concentrations of lupine alkaloids in orally-dosed Holstein cattle.
    Research in veterinary science, 2015
    Co-Authors: Benedict T Green, Kevin D Welch, Dale R Gardner, Stephen T. Lee, Bryan L. Stegelmeier, T. Zane Davis
    Abstract:

    Teratogenic alkaloid-containing Lupinus spp. cause congenital defects known as crooked calf disease that is periodically economically devastating for the cattle industry. Previous research indicates that cattle breeds may eliminate plant toxins differently, potentially altering their susceptibility. The objective of this study was to describe the toxicokinetics in Holsteins of Anagyrine, the teratogenic lupine alkaloid that produces crooked calf disease. Other alkaloids including lupanine, an unidentified alkaloid and 5,6-dehydrolupanine were also evaluated. Dried ground Lupinus leucophyllus was orally dosed to four Holstein steers and blood samples were collected for 96 h, analyzed for serum alkaloid concentrations and toxicokinetic parameters calculated. The serum elimination of Anagyrine in Holstein steers was faster than those reported for beef breeds. This suggests that Holsteins may be less susceptible to lupine-induced crooked calf disease. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and to verify if there is a breed difference in disease incidence or severity.

  • Alkaloid profiles of Dermatophyllum arizonicum, Dermatophyllum gypsophilum, Dermatophyllum secundiflorum, Styphnolobium affine, and Styphnolobium japonicum previously classified as Sophora species
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen T. Lee, Daniel Cook, T. Zane Davis, Russell J. Molyneux, Dale R Gardner
    Abstract:

    Abstract Sophora arizonica , Sophora gypsophila , Sophora secundiflora , Sophora affinis , and Sophora japonica were recently reclassified as Dermatophyllum arizonicum , Dermatophyllum gypsophilum , Dermatophyllum secundiflorum , Styphnolobium affine , and Styphnolobium japonicum , respectively. Some legumes of the sub family Papilionoideae including Sophora species are reported to contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids. The quinolizidine alkaloid profiles of D. arizonicum , D. gypsophilum , D. secundiflorum , S. affine , and S. japonicum were investigated qualitatively and quantitatively using field collections and herbarium specimens throughout their range of geographical distribution for the native species. This is the first report of the alkaloid profiles of D. arizonicum and D. gypsophilum . Alkaloid profiles of the other species were compared to previous reports. The Dermatophyllum species contain quinolizidine alkaloids, and the teratogen Anagyrine ( 11 ), while the Styphnolobium species do not contain quinolizidine alkaloids. The chemotaxonomic data are consistent with the reclassification of each species.

  • The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Stephen T. Lee, Daniel Cook, Clinton A Stonecipher, Russell J. Molyneux, Clairton Marcolongo-pereira, Dale R Gardner
    Abstract:

    Abstract Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous species occur in North America, Sophora stenophylla and Sophora nuttalliana . The quinolizidine alkaloid composition of these two species was investigated throughout their geographical distribution using field collections and herbarium specimens. Both species contain quinolizidine alkaloids, and S. nuttalliana contains the teratogen Anagyrine. Lastly, neither species contains the neurotoxin swainsonine as implied by the common name “white loco” for S. nuttalliana .

Michael H. Ralphs – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Detection of swainsonine and isolation of the endophyte Undifilum from the major locoweeds in Inner Mongolia
    Biochemical Systematics and Ecology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Xinlei Gao, Kip E. Panter, Daniel Cook, Michael H. Ralphs, Ling Yan, Dale R Gardner, Stephen T. Lee, Bing Han, Meng-li Zhao
    Abstract:

    Abstract Locoweeds are Astragalus and Oxytropis species that contain the toxic alkaloid swainsonine, causing widespread poisoning of livestock in Inner Mongolia. Taxa ( Astragalus , Oxytropis , Sphaerophysa , and Sophora species) suspected of causing locoism and/or poisoning in Inner Mongolia were surveyed for swainsonine and Undifilum , the fungal endophyte responsible for the production of swainsonine. Swainsonine was detected at concentrations greater than 0.01% in Astragalus variabilis and Oxytropis glabra . The endophyte Undifilum was detected by culturing and PCR in samples containing swainsonine concentrations greater than 0.01%. In some specimens of A. variabilis and O. glabra swainsonine was not detected or concentrations were less than 0.01%. In these samples the endophyte could not be cultured, but was detected by PCR. Additionally, contrary to previous reports the quinolizidine alkaloids, thermopsine, Anagyrine, and lupanine, were not detected in O. glabra and Oxytropis ochrocephala , however the quinolizidine alkaloids, sophoridine, sophocarpine, and sophoramine were detected in Sophora alopecuroides as previously reported.

  • Velvet Lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus) Population Cycles with Precipitation
    Western North American Naturalist, 2011
    Co-Authors: Michael H. Ralphs, Ernie S. Motteram, Kip E. Panter
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT. Velvet lupine (Lupinus leucophyllus Dougl. ex Lindl) contains the teratogenic alkaloid Anagyrine that causes a crooked calf syndrome. An outbreak of crooked calves occurred in the Channeled Scabland region of eastern Washington in 1997 following 2 years of above-average precipitation. Following this catastrophic loss, we began studies to track velvet lupine density and relate its population cycle to precipitation. In the first study, five 1-m2 quadrats were systematically placed in dense lupine patches at each of 5 locations throughout the scabland region. The quadrats were permanently marked and the number of seedlings and established mature plants were counted biweekly or monthly through the growing seasons of 2001–2005. In the second study, four 1 × 30-m belt transects were established at each of 3 additional locations in the scabland region. The number of seedlings and mature lupine plants were counted within these transects in June or July each year from 2002 to 2009. A third study was cond…

  • Lupine induced “crooked calf disease” in Washington and Oregon: identification of the alkaloid profiles in Lupinus sulfureus, Lupinus leucophyllus, and Lupinus sericeus.
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry, 2007
    Co-Authors: Stephen T. Lee, Kip E. Panter, Daniel Cook, Michael H. Ralphs, Dale R Gardner, Ernie S. Motteram, James A Pfister
    Abstract:

    Several lupines (Lupinus spp.) present on western U.S. rangelands contain alkaloids that are teratogenic to livestock and cause congenital birth defects in calves (crooked calf disease). Periodically, large losses of calves due to lupine-induced “crooked calf disease” occur in northern Oregon and eastern Washington state. Five lupine populations from this area representing three species (L. leucophyllus, L. sulfureus, and L. sericeus) were evaluated taxonomically and by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry, and the major alkaloids in each lupine species were identified. The teratogenic alkaloid Anagyrine was present in both of the lupine species responsible for the high outbreaks in east-central Washington and northeastern Oregon. However, the alkaloid profiles of the two lupines identified as L. leucophyllus were dissimilar, as were the alkaloid profiles of the two lupines identified as L. sulfureus. Botanical classification is not sufficient to determine potential teratogenicity, and it must be followed by chemical characterization to determine risk to livestock.

Isao Kubo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • 2 3 dehydro 10 oxo α isosparteine in uresiphita reversalis larvae fed on cytisus monspessulanus leaves
    Phytochemistry, 2002
    Co-Authors: Ken-ichi Nihei, Kozo Shibata, Isao Kubo
    Abstract:

    Abstract Quinolizidine alkaloids, found in the leaves of Cytisus monspessulanus L. (Leguminosae), were characterized in the cuticle of larvae of the pyralid moth Uresiphita reversalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) when the latter were fed on this weed. By GC–MS analysis of the methanolic extracts of the cuticle, four quinolizidine alkaloids, N -methylcytisine, cytisine, aphylline and Anagyrine, were identified as possible defense substances. In addition, the quinolizidine alkaloid, (+)-2,3-dehydro-10-oxo-α-isosparteine was characterized in both the insect and host plant.

  • (+)-2,3-Dehydro-10-oxo-α-isosparteine in Uresiphita reversalis larvae fed on Cytisus monspessulanus leaves
    Phytochemistry, 2002
    Co-Authors: Ken-ichi Nihei, Kozo Shibata, Isao Kubo
    Abstract:

    Abstract Quinolizidine alkaloids, found in the leaves of Cytisus monspessulanus L. (Leguminosae), were characterized in the cuticle of larvae of the pyralid moth Uresiphita reversalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) when the latter were fed on this weed. By GC–MS analysis of the methanolic extracts of the cuticle, four quinolizidine alkaloids, N -methylcytisine, cytisine, aphylline and Anagyrine, were identified as possible defense substances. In addition, the quinolizidine alkaloid, (+)-2,3-dehydro-10-oxo-α-isosparteine was characterized in both the insect and host plant.