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Analysis Type

The Experts below are selected from a list of 222 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Kuang-hua Chang – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Mechanism Design With Creo Elements/Pro 5.0:
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Kuang-hua Chang

    Abstract:

    Mechanism Design with Creo Elements/Pro 5.0 is designed to help you become familiar with Mechanism Design, a module in the Creo Elements/Pro (formerly Pro/ENGINEER) software family, which supports modeling and Analysis (or simulation) of mechanisms in a virtual (computer) environment. Capabilities in Mechanism Design allow users to simulate and visualize mechanism performance. Using Mechanism Design early in the product development stage could prevent costly redesign due to design defects found in the physical testing phase; therefore, contributing to a more cost effective, reliable, and efficient product development process. The book is written following a project-based learning approach and covers the major concepts and frequently used commands required to advance readers from a novice to an intermediate level. Basic concepts discussed include: model creation, such as body and joint definitions; Analysis Type selection, such as static (assembly) Analysis, kinematics and dynamics; and results visualization. The concepts are introduced using simple, yet realistic, examples. Verifying the results obtained from computer simulation is extremely important. One of the unique features of this textbook is the incorporation of theoretical discussions for kinematic and dynamic analyses in conjunction with simulation results obtained using Mechanism Design. The theoretical discussions simply support the verification of simulation results rather than providing an in-depth discussion on the subjects of kinematics and dynamics. Table of Contents 1. Introduction to Mechanism Design 2. The Ball Throwing Example 3. A Spring Mass System 4. A Simple Pendulum 5. A Slider-Crank Mechanism – Static and Motion Analysis 6. A Compound Spur Gear Train 7. Planetary Gear Train Systems 8. Cam and Follower 9. Assistive Device for Wheelchair Soccer Game 10. Kinematic Analysis for Racecar Suspension Appendix A: Defining Joints Appendix B: Defining Measures Appendix C: The Default Unit System Appendix D: The Magnitude Settings

  • mechanism design with creo elements pro 5 0
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Kuang-hua Chang

    Abstract:

    Mechanism Design with Creo Elements/Pro 5.0 is designed to help you become familiar with Mechanism Design, a module in the Creo Elements/Pro (formerly Pro/ENGINEER) software family, which supports modeling and Analysis (or simulation) of mechanisms in a virtual (computer) environment. Capabilities in Mechanism Design allow users to simulate and visualize mechanism performance. Using Mechanism Design early in the product development stage could prevent costly redesign due to design defects found in the physical testing phase; therefore, contributing to a more cost effective, reliable, and efficient product development process. The book is written following a project-based learning approach and covers the major concepts and frequently used commands required to advance readers from a novice to an intermediate level. Basic concepts discussed include: model creation, such as body and joint definitions; Analysis Type selection, such as static (assembly) Analysis, kinematics and dynamics; and results visualization. The concepts are introduced using simple, yet realistic, examples. Verifying the results obtained from computer simulation is extremely important. One of the unique features of this textbook is the incorporation of theoretical discussions for kinematic and dynamic analyses in conjunction with simulation results obtained using Mechanism Design. The theoretical discussions simply support the verification of simulation results rather than providing an in-depth discussion on the subjects of kinematics and dynamics. Table of Contents 1. Introduction to Mechanism Design 2. The Ball Throwing Example 3. A Spring Mass System 4. A Simple Pendulum 5. A Slider-Crank Mechanism – Static and Motion Analysis 6. A Compound Spur Gear Train 7. Planetary Gear Train Systems 8. Cam and Follower 9. Assistive Device for Wheelchair Soccer Game 10. Kinematic Analysis for Racecar Suspension Appendix A: Defining Joints Appendix B: Defining Measures Appendix C: The Default Unit System Appendix D: The Magnitude Settings

Joseph Salmon – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Stable Recovery with Analysis Decomposable Priors
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Jalal M. Fadili, Gabriel Peyré, Samuel Vaiter, Charles Alban Deledalle, Joseph Salmon

    Abstract:

    In this paper, we investigate in a unified way the structural properties of solutions to inverse problems regularized by the generic class of semi-norms defined as a decomposable norm composed with a linear operator, the so-called Analysis decomposable prior. This encompasses several well-known AnalysisType regularizations such as the discrete total variation, Analysis group-Lasso or the nuclear norm. Our main results establish sufficient conditions under which uniqueness and stability to a bounded noise of the regularized solution are guaranteed.

  • Stable Recovery with Analysis Decomposable Priors
    arXiv: Information Theory, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. J. Fadili, Samuel Vaiter, Gabriel Peyré, Charles Alban Deledalle, Joseph Salmon

    Abstract:

    In this paper, we investigate in a unified way the structural properties of solutions to inverse problems. These solutions are regularized by the generic class of semi-norms defined as a decomposable norm composed with a linear operator, the so-called Analysis Type decomposable prior. This encompasses several well-known AnalysisType regularizations such as the discrete total variation (in any dimension), Analysis group-Lasso or the nuclear norm. Our main results establish sufficient conditions under which uniqueness and stability to a bounded noise of the regularized solution are guaranteed. Along the way, we also provide a strong sufficient uniqueness result that is of independent interest and goes beyond the case of decomposable norms.

Richard Jude Samulski – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • cross packaging of a single adeno associated virus aav Type 2 vector genome into multiple aav seroTypes enables transduction with broad specificity
    Journal of Virology, 2002
    Co-Authors: Joseph E Rabinowitz, F Rolling, Chengwen Li, H Conrath, Weidong Xiao, Xiao Xiao, Richard Jude Samulski

    Abstract:

    The seroTypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) have the potential to become important resources for clinical gene therapy. In an effort to compare the role of seroType-specific virion shells on vector transduction, we cloned each of the seroType capsid coding domains into a common vector backbone containing AAV Type 2 replication genes. This strategy allowed the packaging of AAV2 inverted terminal repeat vectors into each seroType-specific virions. Each of these helper plasmids (pXR1 through pXR5) efficiently replicated the transgene DNA and expressed helper proteins at nearly equivalent levels. In this study, we observed a correlation between the amount of transgene replication and packaging efficiency. The physical titer of these hybrid vectors ranged between 1.3 × 1011 and 9.8 × 1012/ml (Types 1 and 2, respectively). Of the five seroType vectors, only Types 2 and 3 were efficiently purified by heparin-Sepharose column chromatography, illustrating the high degree of similarity between these virions. We analyzed vector transduction in reference and mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in heparan sulfate proteoglycan and saw a correlation between transduction and heparan sulfate binding data. In this Analysis, Types 1 and 5 were most consistent in transduction efficiency across all cell lines tested. In vivo each seroType was ranked after comparison of transgene levels by using different routes of injection and strains of rodents. Overall, in this Analysis, Type 1 was superior for efficient transduction of liver and muscle, followed in order by Types 5, 3, 2, and 4. Surprisingly, this order changed when vector was introduced into rat retina. Types 5 and 4 were most efficient, followed by Type 1. These data established a hierarchy for efficient seroType-specific vector transduction depending on the target tissue. These data also strongly support the need for extending these analyses to additional animal models and human tissue. The development of these helper plasmids should facilitate direct comparisons of seroTypes, as well as begin the standardization of production for further clinical development.