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Analyte Concentration

The Experts below are selected from a list of 18354 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

D.m. Wilson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Pulse-based interface circuits for SPR sensing systems [Analyte Concentration measurement]
    2005 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, 2005
    Co-Authors: L.e. Hansen, M.m.w. Johnston, D.m. Wilson

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a means for reducing the impact of dark current, photodetector mismatch (fixed pattern noise), and the background medium on the signals generated by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system for determining the Concentration of targeted Analytes in solution. Results for each circuit component (simulated and experimental) correlate well, with a maximum error of 3%, 7% and 12% in basic behavior (between simulated and actual results) for the dark current reduction, background medium compensation, and weighted sum circuits at relevant operating points, respectively. System level results on SPR signals also demonstrate the usefulness of these circuits for system-on-chip style signal processing. The chip produces a single output that indicates the refractive index (and resulting Analyte Concentration) of an SPR probe, independent of fluctuations in the background medium.

Graham Ross Dallas Jones – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Critical difference calculations revised: inclusion of variation in standard deviation with Analyte Concentration.
    Annals of clinical biochemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Graham Ross Dallas Jones

    Abstract:

    The critical difference (CD), the smallest difference between sequential laboratory results which is associated with a true change in the patient, is commonly calculated by assuming the same standard deviation (SD) for the initial and subsequent measurements. The calculation of the CD is re-examined without making this assumption.
    A formula for CD is developed, which specifies that even with the assumption of constant coefficient of variations (CV) at the two measurement Concentrations used in the calculation, there will be different SDs due to different Concentrations.
    The effect of removing the assumption of constant SD is to increase the CD for rises in Analyte Concentration and to decrease the CD for falls in Concentration. These effects are caused by increased SD for the second measurement compared with the first when the second measurement is higher, and the reverse when the second is lower.
    Replacing the usual assumption of similar total result SD for both measurements included in the CD calculation with a calculation of the SD at both Analyte Concentrations leads to an increase in the magnitude of the CD for rises in Analyte Concentration and a decrease for falls in Analyte Concentration. This change is proposed for all forms of CD calculations.

  • critical difference calculations revised inclusion of variation in standard deviation with Analyte Concentration
    Annals of Clinical Biochemistry, 2009
    Co-Authors: Graham Ross Dallas Jones

    Abstract:

    BackgroundThe critical difference (CD), the smallest difference between sequential laboratory results which is associated with a true change in the patient, is commonly calculated by assuming the same standard deviation (SD) for the initial and subsequent measurements. The calculation of the CD is re-examined without making this assumption.MethodsA formula for CD is developed, which specifies that even with the assumption of constant coefficient of variations (CV) at the two measurement Concentrations used in the calculation, there will be different SDs due to different Concentrations.ResultsThe effect of removing the assumption of constant SD is to increase the CD for rises in Analyte Concentration and to decrease the CD for falls in Concentration. These effects are caused by increased SD for the second measurement compared with the first when the second measurement is higher, and the reverse when the second is lower.ConclusionsReplacing the usual assumption of similar total result SD for both measuremen…

L.e. Hansen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Pulse-based interface circuits for SPR sensing systems [Analyte Concentration measurement]
    2005 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, 2005
    Co-Authors: L.e. Hansen, M.m.w. Johnston, D.m. Wilson

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a means for reducing the impact of dark current, photodetector mismatch (fixed pattern noise), and the background medium on the signals generated by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system for determining the Concentration of targeted Analytes in solution. Results for each circuit component (simulated and experimental) correlate well, with a maximum error of 3%, 7% and 12% in basic behavior (between simulated and actual results) for the dark current reduction, background medium compensation, and weighted sum circuits at relevant operating points, respectively. System level results on SPR signals also demonstrate the usefulness of these circuits for system-on-chip style signal processing. The chip produces a single output that indicates the refractive index (and resulting Analyte Concentration) of an SPR probe, independent of fluctuations in the background medium.

  • ISCAS (2) – Pulse-based interface circuits for SPR sensing systems [Analyte Concentration measurement]
    2005 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, 2005
    Co-Authors: L.e. Hansen, M.m.w. Johnston, Denise Wilson

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a means for reducing the impact of dark current, photodetector mismatch (fixed pattern noise), and the background medium on the signals generated by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system for determining the Concentration of targeted Analytes in solution. Results for each circuit component (simulated and experimental) correlate well, with a maximum error of 3%, 7% and 12% in basic behavior (between simulated and actual results) for the dark current reduction, background medium compensation, and weighted sum circuits at relevant operating points, respectively. System level results on SPR signals also demonstrate the usefulness of these circuits for system-on-chip style signal processing. The chip produces a single output that indicates the refractive index (and resulting Analyte Concentration) of an SPR probe, independent of fluctuations in the background medium.