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Anatomic Imaging

The Experts below are selected from a list of 288 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Abby R. Rosenberg – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • early response as assessed by Anatomic Imaging does not predict failure free survival among patients with group iii rhabdomyosarcoma a report from the children s oncology group
    European Journal of Cancer, 2014
    Co-Authors: Carola A.s. Arndt, Abby R. Rosenberg, Elizabeth Lyden, James R. Anderson, David A. Rodeberg, Suzanne L. Wolden, David M. Parham, Douglas S. Hawkins

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background The prognostic significance of response to induction therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) by Anatomic Imaging [computerised tomographic (CT) or magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) scan] is controversial. We previously reported no relationship between early response and failure-free survival (FFS) on Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV. We repeated the same analysis using a more recent clinical trial as an independent cohort of patients with non-metastatic, initially unresected RMS. Methods A total of 338 patients enrolled in Children’s Oncology Group (COG) study D9803 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis: (1) non-metastatic, initially unresected (Group III); (2) embryonal (ERMS) or alveolar (ARMS) histology; (3) documented protocol week 12 response to induction chemotherapy (excluding progressive disease) based on Anatomic Imaging (CT/MRI) and (4) documented protocol therapy beyond week 12. Response at week 12 was determined by the treating institution as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or no response (NR). FFS was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and comparisons between patient subsets were made using the log-rank test. Results Overall objective response rate (CR + PR) at week 12 of therapy was 85% and was similar between ERMS and ARMS. FFS was similar among all patients with CR, PR or NR (p = 0.49). Restricting the analysis to either ERMS or ARMS, there was no difference in FFS by response within either histology subset (p = 0.89 and p = 0.08, respectively). Conclusions These findings provide additional evidence that Anatomic Imaging to assess early response to therapy among patients with RMS does not predict outcome and has questionable use in tailoring subsequent therapy.

  • Evaluation of early response by Anatomic Imaging to predict survival among patients with group III rhabdomyosarcoma: A report from the Children’s Oncology Group.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Douglas S. Hawkins, Abby R. Rosenberg, Elizabeth Lyden, James R. Anderson, David A. Rodeberg, Suzanne L. Wolden, David M. Parham, Carola A.s. Arndt

    Abstract:

    10012 Background: The prognostic significance of response to induction therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) by Anatomic Imaging (computerized tomographic [CT] or magnetic resonance Imaging [MRI] scan) is controversial. We previously reported no relationship between early response and failure-free survival (FFS) for patients on IRS-IV. We repeated the same analysis using an independent cohort of patients with non-metastatic, initially unresected RMS treated on a more recent clinical trial. Methods: A total of 338 patients enrolled in Children’s Oncology Group study D9803 met the following inclusion criteria for this analysis: 1) non-metastatic, initially unresected (Group III); 2) embryonal (ERMS) or alveolar (ARMS) histology; 3) documented response to induction chemotherapy (excluding progressive disease) based on Anatomic Imaging; and 4) documented therapy beyond week 12. Response at week 12 was determined by the treating institution as complete response (CR, complete resolution), partial response (PR, dec…

Philip P Breitfeld – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • assessment of response to induction therapy and its influence on 5 year failure free survival in group iii rhabdomyosarcoma the intergroup rhabdomyosarcoma study iv experience a report from the soft tissue sarcoma committee of the children s oncology
    Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Megan Burke, James R. Anderson, David A. Rodeberg, Suzanne L. Wolden, Stephen J Qualman, William H Meyer, Philip P Breitfeld

    Abstract:

    Purpose Initial response to induction chemotherapy predicts failure-free survival (FFS) in osteosarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma. For Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) IV patients with group III rhabdomyosarcoma, we assessed whether reported response assessed by Anatomic Imaging at week 8 predicted FFS. Patients and Methods We studied 444 group III patients who received induction therapy, had response assessed at week 8 by Anatomic Imaging, and continued with protocol therapy. Induction chemotherapy was generally followed by radiation therapy (RT) starting after week 9. Response to induction therapy was determined at weeks 0 and 8. Local institutions coded response. Results Response rate for the entire cohort at week 8 was 77% (95% CI, 73% to 81%; complete response [CR], 21%; partial response [PR], 56%) but response had no influence on FFS (P = .57). Two hundred seventy-two patients received standard-timing RT at week 9 and thus only chemotherapy during induction. Response rate was 81% (95% CI, 76% to 86…

E K J Pauwels – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • positron emission tomography with 2 18f fluoro 2 deoxy d glucose in oncology part iiib therapy response monitoring in colorectal and lung tumours head and neck cancer hepatocellular carcinoma and sarcoma
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2001
    Co-Authors: Marcel P M Stokkel, A Draisma, E K J Pauwels

    Abstract:

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is considered to be a very useful adjunct to Anatomic Imaging techniques and is now primarily used for oncological indications. These indications include diagnosis, staging, and therapy monitoring. In this review, we discuss the articles in which FDG-PET is clinically used for monitoring therapy in lung and colorectal tumours, head and neck cancer, sarcoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. It is found that the amount of FDG uptake strongly correlates with response to therapy: a decrease in FDG uptake after therapy indicates a positive response to therapy. However, this conclusion is based on small numbers of patients, whereas the exact response mechanism is still unknown. Moreover, in these case series, the interval between tumour therapy and FDG-PET, as well as the method of quantification, SUV or tumour-to-non-tumour ratios, differ per study. Finally, dynamic Imaging is a recommended technique by some authors, but it is not a standard technique in clinical practice to evaluate tumour therapy. Therefore, further study is required which has to deal with these major issues before it is possible to draw definite conclusions.