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Angioendotheliomatosis

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Elena Levtchenko – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine
    Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Besouw, I. Bongaers, Leo A. J. Kluijtmans, M. Dewerchin, L. Heuvel, R. Eijsden, Elena Levtchenko

    Abstract:

    Background Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (Angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of Angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC). Methods After cysteamine exposure (range 0–3.0 mM) during 24 h, cell viability was measured using water soluble tetrazolium salt-1 (WST-1) in both control HDMVEC and fibroblasts. Cell proliferation and apoptosis rate were measured in HDMVEC by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and caspase 3 and caspase 7 activity, respectively. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) was measured in HDMVEC after cysteamine exposure of 0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM. Medium and cysteamine were refreshed every 6 h to mimic the in vivo situation. Next, cell viability in HDMVEC was measured after 24 h of GSH exposure (range 0–10.0 mM). Results HDMVEC viability and proliferation increased after cysteamine exposure 0.03–3.0 mM ( p  

  • Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine
    Journal of inherited metabolic disease, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Besouw, L.p.w.j. Van Den Heuvel, R. Van Eijsden, I. Bongaers, Leo A. J. Kluijtmans, M. Dewerchin, Elena Levtchenko

    Abstract:

    Background
    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (Angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of Angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC).

M. Besouw – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine
    Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Besouw, I. Bongaers, Leo A. J. Kluijtmans, M. Dewerchin, L. Heuvel, R. Eijsden, Elena Levtchenko

    Abstract:

    Background Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (Angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of Angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC). Methods After cysteamine exposure (range 0–3.0 mM) during 24 h, cell viability was measured using water soluble tetrazolium salt-1 (WST-1) in both control HDMVEC and fibroblasts. Cell proliferation and apoptosis rate were measured in HDMVEC by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and caspase 3 and caspase 7 activity, respectively. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) was measured in HDMVEC after cysteamine exposure of 0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM. Medium and cysteamine were refreshed every 6 h to mimic the in vivo situation. Next, cell viability in HDMVEC was measured after 24 h of GSH exposure (range 0–10.0 mM). Results HDMVEC viability and proliferation increased after cysteamine exposure 0.03–3.0 mM ( p  

  • Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine
    Journal of inherited metabolic disease, 2013
    Co-Authors: M. Besouw, L.p.w.j. Van Den Heuvel, R. Van Eijsden, I. Bongaers, Leo A. J. Kluijtmans, M. Dewerchin, Elena Levtchenko

    Abstract:

    Background
    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (Angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of Angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC).

Eduardo Fonseca – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Reactive Angioendotheliomatosis associated with myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Acta dermato-venereologica, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jesús Del Pozo, W. Martínez, Felipe Sacristán, J. Rodríguez‐lozano, Eduardo Fonseca

    Abstract:

    Sir, Although Gottron & Nikolowsky (1) probably reported the first case of Angioendotheliomatosis in 1958, this term was proposed in 1963 by Tappeiner & Pfleger (2), who described a proliferation of endothelial cells within the lumen of dermal vessels with secondary necrosis and infarction of the skin. To our knowledge, only 39 cases of reactive Angioendotheliomatosis have been reported in the literature, usually as isolated cases, except the series of 15 cases published by McMenamin & Flether (3). The association of reactive Angioendotheliomatosis with systemic diseases is common, but some exceptional cases have been described without any association (4). Several factors may play an important role in this process, including angiogenic circulant factors (5) such as VEGF, procoagulant factors and localized hypoxia that produces oxidative stress with release of free radicals. We report here a case of reactive Angioendotheliomatosis with crusted-necrotic ear lesions after cold exposure. The patient also had a myelodysplastic syndrome.