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Angiogenesis Inhibitors

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Judah Folkman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • role of endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors in down syndrome
    Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sandra Ryeom, Judah Folkman
    Abstract:

    AbstractNew blood vessel growth via Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in both physiological and pathological conditions. Physiological Angiogenesis is critical during embryogenesis and placental development, whereas pathological Angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression of many dis

  • Role of endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors in Down syndrome.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery, 2009
    Co-Authors: Sandra Ryeom, Judah Folkman
    Abstract:

    New blood vessel growth via Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in both physiological and pathological conditions. Physiological Angiogenesis is critical during embryogenesis and placental development, whereas pathological Angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression of many diseases, most notably tumor growth. Tumor Angiogenesis is well accepted to be regulated by a balance of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors produced both by tumor cells and surrounding stromal cells. For many years, investigation of antiangiogenic therapies for cancer has focused on the proangiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor; its receptors; or downstream signaling pathways. However, more recently with the identification of endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors, studies have turned toward understanding the role of endogenous antiangiogenic proteins in preventing disease progression. Clinical clues have suggested that specific populations may have dysregulated Angiogenesis due to differential expression of endogenous Angiogenesis regulators. For example, individuals with Down syndrome may possess a systemic antiangiogenic state with a significantly decreased incidence of Angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Our work suggests that endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors may be the master regulators controlling progression of Angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as vascular anomalies and cancer. The molecular regulation of Angiogenesis is not yet fully understood; however, the Down syndrome population may give us insights toward novel therapies for controlling Angiogenesis in disease.

  • Endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors
    APMIS : acta pathologica microbiologica et immunologica Scandinavica, 2004
    Co-Authors: Judah Folkman
    Abstract:

    When the FDA commissioner announced in February 2004 the approval of Avastin for the treatment of patients with colon cancer, he called Angiogenesis Inhibitors a fourth modality of anti-cancer therapy. Because Angiogenesis Inhibitors are relatively less toxic than conventional chemotherapy and have a lower risk of drug resistance, they may also represent a new class of anti-cancer agents, some of which have sufficiently reduced toxicity that they may be safely used long term. These include immunotherapy, vaccines, telomerase Inhibitors, apoptosis inducers, low dose metronomic chemotherapy, novel hormonal therapies, gene therapy and others. However, at least 16 endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors have been discovered in the circulation, and/or in the extracellular matrix. These may become the safest and least toxic of anti-cancer therapies. Four are already being administered by injection in clinical trials for cancer. Recently, it has been reported that at least two endogenous Angiogenesis Inhibitors can be significantly increased in humans (endostatin), and in mice (thrombospondin), by oral administration of small molecules which themselves are already FDA approved for other uses. This finding suggests several new clinical applications for the future, including the possibility of guiding the use of Angiogenesis Inhibitors by blood or urinary biomarkers, currently being developed, that may detect the presence of cancer before it is symptomatic, or before it can be located by conventional methods.

Li Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors in advanced non small cell lung cancer a systematic review and meta analysis
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Shaodong Hong, Min Tan, Shouzheng Wang, Shengyuan Luo, Yue Chen, Li Zhang
    Abstract:

    Purpose Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway plays a crucial role in Angiogenesis and has become a promising target for cancer drug development. We aimed to quantify the overall efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Shouzheng Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors in advanced non small cell lung cancer a systematic review and meta analysis
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Shaodong Hong, Min Tan, Shouzheng Wang, Shengyuan Luo, Yue Chen, Li Zhang
    Abstract:

    Purpose Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway plays a crucial role in Angiogenesis and has become a promising target for cancer drug development. We aimed to quantify the overall efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Xianhe Xie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors in small-cell lung cancer
    Oncotarget, 2016
    Co-Authors: Heng Lin, Shuimei Luo, Sijing Zhou, Ruifen Shen, Haitao Yang, Huijuan Chen, Xianhe Xie
    Abstract:

    // Heng Lin 1, 2, * , Lina Li 1, * , Shuimei Luo 1 , Sijing Zhou 1 , Ruifen Shen 1 , Haitao Yang 1 , Huijuan Chen 1 , Xianhe Xie 1 1 Department of Chemotherapy, The First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China 2 Department of Oncology, Fuzhou Pulmonary Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian, China * These authors have contributed equally to this work Correspondence to: Xianhe Xie, email: xiexianhe@yahoo.com Keywords: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, small-cell lung cancer, meta-analysis Received: July 02, 2016     Accepted: November 09, 2016     Published: November 25, 2016 ABSTRACT Objective : The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of Angiogenesis Inhibitors for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods : Totally, 16 controlled trials (1898 cases) involving Angiogenesis Inhibitors plus chemotherapy (ACT group) versus chemotherapy alone group (CT group) were identified from PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Wanfang Data before March 2016. Results : Compared with CT group, ACT group obtained a significant benefit on objective response rate (ORR) (RR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.19-1.51; P < 0.00001) and a trend of prolonging progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.73-1.01; P = 0.07) without improving overall survival (OS) (HR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.94-1.17; P = 0.36). Remarkably, subgroup analysis showed that the antibodies targeting VEGF significantly prolonged PFS (HR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.64-0.90; P = 0.001). With regard to toxicity, there was no significant difference in severe adverse events (AEs, Grade≥3) between two groups except that gastrointestinal symptom, hypertension, metabolic disorders, neurology and pain were higher in ACT group. Conclusion : Compared with chemotherapy alone, antibodies targeting VEGF plus chemotherapy significantly improved ORR and prolonged PFS with an acceptable toxicity profile for patients with SCLC. Therefore, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, especially antibodies targeting VEGF, combining with chemotherapy may be a potential promising strategy in managing SCLC.

Egbert F. Smit – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Angiogenesis Inhibitors in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.
    Therapeutic advances in medical oncology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Joline S.w. Lind, Egbert F. Smit
    Abstract:

    A therapeutic plateau seems to have been reached with the standard treatment of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and new treatment options are urgently needed. Recent insight into the molecular biology of cancer has identified Angiogenesis as one of the key biological processes. The major player in tumor Angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. VEGF is expressed in the majority of NSCLC and overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis. The VEGF pathway can be inhibited in two main ways: targeting VEGF directly or inhibiting the VEGF receptors. The development of Angiogenesis Inhibitors has shown great promise in the treatment of NSCLC. Bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF antibody, has been approved for the treatment of advanced NSCLC and other drugs are undergoing phase III investigation. However, a number of unresolved issues remain. In this review, we discuss the main Angiogenesis Inhibitors in development for the treatment of NSCLC focusing on the VEGF pathway.