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Angular Momentum

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Miles J. Padgett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • orbital Angular Momentum 25 years on invited
    Optics Express, 2017
    Co-Authors: Miles J. Padgett

    Abstract:

    Twenty-five years ago Allen, Beijersbergen, Spreeuw, and Woerdman published their seminal paper establishing that light beams with helical phase-fronts carried an orbital Angular Momentum. Previously orbital Angular Momentum had been associated only with high-order atomic/molecular transitions and hence considered to be a rare occurrence. The realization that every photon in a laser beam could carry an orbital Angular Momentum that was in excess of the Angular Momentum associated with photon spin has led both to new understandings of optical effects and various applications. These applications range from optical manipulation, imaging and quantum optics, to optical communications. This brief review will examine some of the research in the field to date and consider what future directions might hold.

  • IV The Orbital Angular Momentum of Light
    Progress in Optics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Les Allen, Miles J. Padgett, Mohamed Babiker

    Abstract:

    Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the orbital Angular Momentum of light, outlines the theoretical basis for the orbital Angular Momentum of beams within the paraxial approximation, and indicates the unapproximated theory, based on the full set of Maxwell equations. The chapter discusses the problems associated with the separation and identification of spin and orbital contributions to the Angular Momentum properties of a field, the properties of Laguerre–Gaussian beams, which are physically realizable in the laboratory, and the ways in which the beams may be generated. It reviews the phenomenological behavior of beams possessing orbital Angular Momentum and their interaction with matter in bulk. The chapter also describes the measurement of the rotational Doppler shift, which arises when beams possessing orbital and spin Angular momenta are rotated. The dipole-interaction of atoms with the orbital Angular Momentum of light beams is considered. The roles of spin and orbital Angular Momentum are also compared and contrasted.

  • light s orbital Angular Momentum
    Physics Today, 2004
    Co-Authors: Miles J. Padgett, Johannes Courtial, Les Allen

    Abstract:

    The realization that light beams can have quantized orbital Angular Momentum in addition to spin Angular Momentum has led, in recent years, to novel experiments in quantum mechanics and new methods for manipulating microparticles

Les Allen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • IV The Orbital Angular Momentum of Light
    Progress in Optics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Les Allen, Miles J. Padgett, Mohamed Babiker

    Abstract:

    Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the orbital Angular Momentum of light, outlines the theoretical basis for the orbital Angular Momentum of beams within the paraxial approximation, and indicates the unapproximated theory, based on the full set of Maxwell equations. The chapter discusses the problems associated with the separation and identification of spin and orbital contributions to the Angular Momentum properties of a field, the properties of Laguerre–Gaussian beams, which are physically realizable in the laboratory, and the ways in which the beams may be generated. It reviews the phenomenological behavior of beams possessing orbital Angular Momentum and their interaction with matter in bulk. The chapter also describes the measurement of the rotational Doppler shift, which arises when beams possessing orbital and spin Angular momenta are rotated. The dipole-interaction of atoms with the orbital Angular Momentum of light beams is considered. The roles of spin and orbital Angular Momentum are also compared and contrasted.

  • Advances in optical Angular Momentum
    Laser and Photonics Reviews, 2008
    Co-Authors: Sonja Franke-arnold, Les Allen, Miles Padgett

    Abstract:

    Some 16 years ago, Allen et al. [Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (1992)] recognised that laser beams which carried an an- gular Momentum additional to photon spin, could be realized in the laboratory. Such beams have helical phase fronts and so have an azimuthal component to the Poynting vector, which results in Angular Momentum along the beam axis. This orbital Angular Momentum, very often combined with spin to make op- tical Angular Momentum, has given rise to many developments. These range from optical spanners for driving micro-machines to high dimensional quantum entanglement and new opportuni- ties in quantum information processing. The concept of orbital Angular Momentum is now leading to new understanding of a wide range of phenomena, including fundamental processes in Bose-Einstein condensates, while the associated technologies have led to new applications in optical tweezing and microscopy.

  • Light’s Orbital Angular Momentum
    Physics Today, 2004
    Co-Authors: Miles J. Padgett, Johannes Courtial, Les Allen

    Abstract:

    The realization that light beams can have quantized orbital Angular Momentum in addition to spin Angular Momentum has led, in recent years, to novel experiments in quantum mechanics and new methods for manipulating microparticles

N R Heckenberg – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Angular Momentum of a strongly focused gaussian beam
    Journal of Optics, 2008
    Co-Authors: Timo A Nieminen, Alexander B Stilgoe, N R Heckenberg, Halina Rubinszteindunlop

    Abstract:

    A circularly polarized paraxial Gaussian laser beam carries ± ¯ h Angular Momentum per photon as spin, with zero orbital Angular Momentum. Focusing the beam with a rotationally symmetric lens cannot change this Angular Momentum flux, yet the focused beam must have spin |Sz| < ¯ h per photon. The remainder of the original spin is converted to orbital Angular Momentum, manifesting itself as a longitudinal optical vortex at the focus. We investigate the nature of this orbital Angular Momentum.

  • optical Angular Momentum transfer to trapped absorbing particles
    Physical Review A, 1996
    Co-Authors: Halina Rubinszteindunlop, N R Heckenberg, M E J Friese, J Enger

    Abstract:

    Spin Angular Momentum of photons and the associated polarization of light has been known for many years. However, it is only over the last decade or so that physically realizable laboratory light beams have been used to study the orbital Angular Momentum of light. In many respects, orbital and spin Angular Momentum behave in a similar manner, but they differ significantly in others. In particular, orbital Angular Momentum offers exciting new possibilities with respect to the optical manipulation of matter and to the study of the entanglement of photons.Bringing together 44 landmark papers, “Optical Angular Momentum” offers the first comprehensive overview of the subject as it has developed. It chronicles the first decade of this important subject and gives a definitive statement of the current status of all aspects of optical Angular Momentum. In each chapter, the editors include a concise introduction, putting the selected papers into context and outlining the key articles a