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Animal Community

The Experts below are selected from a list of 315 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Pierre-michel Forget – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Frugivores and seed removal at Tetragastris altissima (Burseraceae) in a fragmented forested landscape of French Guiana
    Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Sandra Ratiarison, Pierre-michel Forget

    Abstract:

    We aimed at (1) determining how Community-wide disruptions affect visitation by frugivores at trees and (2) estimating the impact of visitation shifts on seed fate following fruit consumption, especially seed removal. We compared the seed fate of a frugivore-dispersed tree species (Tetragastris altissima, Burseraceae) in four forested islands with that for a mainland continuous forest at Saint-EugFrench Guiana. Tetragastris trees attracted opportunistic frugivore species available in the area, the most productive trees attracting more consumer species. Only primates, which are more susceptible to forest disturbances than birds and have low abilities to cross a non- forested matrix, were more frequent at Tetragastris on the mainland than on islands. Only opportunistic frugivorous primate species acting as low-efficiency seed dispersers were recorded. As a result, seed removal was equally low among habitats (nearly 26%), high percentages of seeds dropping below tree crowns. The scarcity of large-bodied specialist frugivorous primates throughout the landscape probably explained this low removal. Our results underline how difficult it is to generalize the cascading effects of disruptions in a frugivore Community on tree seed fate, these effects likely varying according to the tree species and Animal Community involved.

  • Frugivores and seed removal at Tetragastris altissima (Burseraceae) in a fragmented forested landscape of French Guiana
    Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2005
    Co-Authors: Sandra Ratiarison, Pierre-michel Forget

    Abstract:

    We aimed at (1) determining how Community-wide disruptions affect visitation by frugivores at trees and (2) estimating the impact of visitation shifts on seed fate following fruit consumption, especially seed removal. We compared the seed fate of a frugivore-dispersed tree species (Tetragastris altissima, Burseraceae) in four forested islands with that for a mainland continuous forest at Saint-Eugène, French Guiana. Tetragastris trees attracted opportunistic frugivore species available in the area, the most productive trees attracting more consumer species. Only primates, which are more susceptible to forest disturbances than birds and have low abilities to cross a non-forested matrix, were more frequent at Tetragastris on the mainland than on islands. Only opportunistic frugivorous primate species acting as low-efficiency seed dispersers were recorded. As a result, seed removal was equally low among habitats (nearly 26%), high percentages of seeds dropping below tree crowns. The scarcity of large-bodied specialist frugivorous primates throughout the landscape probably explained this low removal. Our results underline how difficult it is to generalize the cascading effects of disruptions in a frugivore Community on tree seed fate, these effects likely varying according to the tree species and Animal Community involved.

Sheng Yu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • characteristics of soil Animal Community in the subalpine alpine forests of western sichuan during onset of freezing
    Acta Ecologica Sinica, 2010
    Co-Authors: Fuzhong Wu, Wanqin Yang, Sheng Yu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Seasonal freeze–thaw cycle is a common phenomenon in the subalpine/alpine forest region, and may have a significant influence on the structure and function of soil Animal Community. To understand the characteristics and dynamics of soil Animal Community as well as its response to repeated freeze–thaw events in this region during onset of freezing, a field experiment was conducted to investigate the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil fauna in primary fir (Abies faxoniana) forest, fir and birch (Betula albosinensis) mixed forest and secondary fir (A. faxoniana) forest, which were three representative forests in the subalpine and alpine forest region in western Sichuan. Soil samples were collected from November 3 to November 27, 2008, which was defined as onset of freezing based on the simultaneous monitoring of soil temperature. Soil macrofauna were picked up by hand in the fields. Mesofauna were separated and collected from the soil samples by Baermann and Tullgren methods, respectively. By preliminary identification, 40,942 individuals were collected, which belonged to 7 phyla, 15 classes and 25 orders in the three sampling forests. 16,557, 14,669 and 9716 individuals were found in primary forest, mixed forest and secondary forest, respectively. In comparison with the mineral soil layer, the soil organic layer had higher density and groups of soil fauna. Furthermore, following the repeated freeze–thaw events, density and groups of soil fauna experienced a distinct decrease in both soil organic layer and mineral soil layer, and this trend in soil organic layer was more significant in the primary forest, owing to higher intense and more frequent freeze–thaw cycles in soil organic layer of the primary forest. The results revealed that soil Animals were sensitive bio-indicators to environmental changes, such as repeated freeze–thaw events and dry–wet cycle. Meanwhile, the results also implied that the dynamics of the structure and function of soil Animal Community during the onset of freezing was of ecological significance to understand the wintertime ecological process in soils.

  • Characteristics of soil Animal Community in the subalpine/alpine forests of western Sichuan during onset of freezing
    Acta Ecologica Sinica, 2010
    Co-Authors: Fuzhong Wu, Wanqin Yang, Sheng Yu

    Abstract:

    Abstract Seasonal freeze–thaw cycle is a common phenomenon in the subalpine/alpine forest region, and may have a significant influence on the structure and function of soil Animal Community. To understand the characteristics and dynamics of soil Animal Community as well as its response to repeated freeze–thaw events in this region during onset of freezing, a field experiment was conducted to investigate the composition, abundance, and diversity of soil fauna in primary fir (Abies faxoniana) forest, fir and birch (Betula albosinensis) mixed forest and secondary fir (A. faxoniana) forest, which were three representative forests in the subalpine and alpine forest region in western Sichuan. Soil samples were collected from November 3 to November 27, 2008, which was defined as onset of freezing based on the simultaneous monitoring of soil temperature. Soil macrofauna were picked up by hand in the fields. Mesofauna were separated and collected from the soil samples by Baermann and Tullgren methods, respectively. By preliminary identification, 40,942 individuals were collected, which belonged to 7 phyla, 15 classes and 25 orders in the three sampling forests. 16,557, 14,669 and 9716 individuals were found in primary forest, mixed forest and secondary forest, respectively. In comparison with the mineral soil layer, the soil organic layer had higher density and groups of soil fauna. Furthermore, following the repeated freeze–thaw events, density and groups of soil fauna experienced a distinct decrease in both soil organic layer and mineral soil layer, and this trend in soil organic layer was more significant in the primary forest, owing to higher intense and more frequent freeze–thaw cycles in soil organic layer of the primary forest. The results revealed that soil Animals were sensitive bio-indicators to environmental changes, such as repeated freeze–thaw events and dry–wet cycle. Meanwhile, the results also implied that the dynamics of the structure and function of soil Animal Community during the onset of freezing was of ecological significance to understand the wintertime ecological process in soils.

Philippe Clergeau – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Small urban woodlands as biodiversity conservation hot-spot: a multi-taxon approach
    Landscape Ecology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Solène Croci, Alain Butet, Anita Georges, Rahim Aguejdad, Philippe Clergeau

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the importance of urban woodlands to serve as potential sites for biodiversity conservation, we analysed bird, carabid beetle and small mammal Community responses to urbanisation at different spatial scales. We analysed the relationships between the variations of the structure (species richness S, diversity H′ and dominance D) of Animal communities of woodlands distributed along a rural–urban gradient, and the variations along this same gradient of (1) the vegetation within woodlands, (2) the landscape at 100 m and (3) 600 m around the woodlands. We identified the spatial scales whose variations along the gradient most affected each Animal Community structure, and characterised Community responses to these variations. Our results showed that urbanisation affected taxa differently according to their dispersal ability. Carabid beetles, less mobile, seem to be sensitive to increasing fragmentation and built surfaces from periurban to town centre which could make their movement within the urban landscape difficult. Birds, mobile species, seem to be more sensitive to variations of the vegetation structure within woodlands from periurban to town centre that could affect their capacity to maintain in habitat patches. Although our study did not allow relating the small mammal Community structure to urbanisation, it suggests that this taxa is sensitive to urban local disturbances. A relevant management scale of woodlands can be specified for each taxa conservation. Urban woodlands accommodate over 50% of the species present in periurban woodlands, and effective management could enhance this number. Woodlands seem to be a good choice for promoting biodiversity conservation in towns.