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Heli I. Koskinen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Prevention of zoonotic Animal Diseases: a step towards co-operation among Nordic authorities?
    Journal of Public Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Heli I. Koskinen
    Abstract:

    Aim With globalisation, the spreading and consequences of serious Animal Diseases will become an increasingly realistic threat, also to Nordic countries, their food Animals and consumers. It has already been suggested that it might be useful to establish an army to manage all co-operations among countries, for instance, for medical co-operation needs. In light of this, it might also be important to guarantee the security of Animal products and to fight together against Animal Diseases, some of which are potentially dangerous for human beings. The aim of this study was to investigate how the laws concerning Animal Diseases construct the reality of co-operation among authorities in different Nordic countries. Subjects and Methods The laws were qualitatively analysed in the framework of discourse analysis. Results The different situations in different Nordic countries were introduced. Uniform legislation among Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Norway was missing. Conclusion In the future, the potential for real co-operation among not only authorities on the national level but also with those from different countries should be investigated.

  • Prevention of zoonotic Animal Diseases: a step towards co-operation among Nordic authorities?
    Journal of Public Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Heli I. Koskinen
    Abstract:

    Aim With globalisation, the spreading and consequences of serious Animal Diseases will become an increasingly realistic threat, also to Nordic countries, their food Animals and consumers. It has already been suggested that it might be useful to establish an army to manage all co-operations among countries, for instance, for medical co-operation needs. In light of this, it might also be important to guarantee the security of Animal products and to fight together against Animal Diseases, some of which are potentially dangerous for human beings. The aim of this study was to investigate how the laws concerning Animal Diseases construct the reality of co-operation among authorities in different Nordic countries.

Scott H Newman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the role of wildlife in transboundary Animal Diseases
    Animal Health Research Reviews, 2011
    Co-Authors: J L Siembieda, Richard Kock, T A Mccracken, Scott H Newman
    Abstract:

    This paper identifies some of the more important Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface and the role wildlife plays in disease transmission. Domestic livestock, wildlife and humans share many similar pathogens. Pathogens of wild or domestic Animal origin that can cause infections in humans are known as zoonotic organisms and the converse are termed as anthroponotic organisms. Seventy-seven percent of livestock pathogens and 91% of domestic carnivore pathogens are known to infect multiple hosts, including wildlife. Understanding this group of pathogens is critical to public health safety, because they infect a wide range of hosts and are most likely to emerge as novel causes of infection in humans and domestic Animals. Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface, particularly those that are zoonotic, must be an area of focus for public health programs and surveillance for emerging infectious Diseases. Additionally, understanding wildlife and their role is a vital part of understanding the epidemiology and ecology of Diseases. To do this, a multi-faceted approach combining capacity building and training, wildlife disease surveillance, wildlife-livestock interface and disease ecology studies, data and information sharing and outbreak investigation are needed.

J L Siembieda – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the role of wildlife in transboundary Animal Diseases
    Animal Health Research Reviews, 2011
    Co-Authors: J L Siembieda, Richard Kock, T A Mccracken, Scott H Newman
    Abstract:

    This paper identifies some of the more important Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface and the role wildlife plays in disease transmission. Domestic livestock, wildlife and humans share many similar pathogens. Pathogens of wild or domestic Animal origin that can cause infections in humans are known as zoonotic organisms and the converse are termed as anthroponotic organisms. Seventy-seven percent of livestock pathogens and 91% of domestic carnivore pathogens are known to infect multiple hosts, including wildlife. Understanding this group of pathogens is critical to public health safety, because they infect a wide range of hosts and are most likely to emerge as novel causes of infection in humans and domestic Animals. Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface, particularly those that are zoonotic, must be an area of focus for public health programs and surveillance for emerging infectious Diseases. Additionally, understanding wildlife and their role is a vital part of understanding the epidemiology and ecology of Diseases. To do this, a multi-faceted approach combining capacity building and training, wildlife disease surveillance, wildlife-livestock interface and disease ecology studies, data and information sharing and outbreak investigation are needed.

Richard Kock – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the role of wildlife in transboundary Animal Diseases
    Animal Health Research Reviews, 2011
    Co-Authors: J L Siembieda, Richard Kock, T A Mccracken, Scott H Newman
    Abstract:

    This paper identifies some of the more important Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface and the role wildlife plays in disease transmission. Domestic livestock, wildlife and humans share many similar pathogens. Pathogens of wild or domestic Animal origin that can cause infections in humans are known as zoonotic organisms and the converse are termed as anthroponotic organisms. Seventy-seven percent of livestock pathogens and 91% of domestic carnivore pathogens are known to infect multiple hosts, including wildlife. Understanding this group of pathogens is critical to public health safety, because they infect a wide range of hosts and are most likely to emerge as novel causes of infection in humans and domestic Animals. Diseases at the wildlife-livestock interface, particularly those that are zoonotic, must be an area of focus for public health programs and surveillance for emerging infectious Diseases. Additionally, understanding wildlife and their role is a vital part of understanding the epidemiology and ecology of Diseases. To do this, a multi-faceted approach combining capacity building and training, wildlife disease surveillance, wildlife-livestock interface and disease ecology studies, data and information sharing and outbreak investigation are needed.

  • infectious Animal Diseases the wildlife livestock interface
    Revue Scientifique Et Technique De L Office International Des Epizooties, 2002
    Co-Authors: R G Bengis, Richard Kock, J Fischer
    Abstract:

    The long-standing conflict between livestock owners and Animal health authorities on the one hand, and wildlife conservationists on the other, is largely based on differing attitudes to controlling Diseases of livestock which are associated with wildlife. The authors have attempted to highlight the fact that these disease problems are frequently bi-directional at the wildlife/livestock interface. The different categories of Diseases involved are presented. A new dimension being faced by veterinary regulatory authorities is the spectre of emerging sylvatic foci of Diseases, such as bovine tubetuberculosis, bovine brucellosis and possibly rinderpest; these Diseases threaten to undermine national and international eradication schemes, which have been implemented and executed with significant success, and at great cost. Conversely, wildlife-based ecotourism world-wide has expanded rapidly over the past decade and is the source of lacking foreign revenue for many developing countries. Traditional subsistence farming is still the largest source of much-needed protein on some continents and this, together with the growth and hunger of historically disadvantaged communities for land, is forcing enterprises and communities with markedly different objectives and land-use practices to operate effectively in close proximity. Some land-users rely exclusively on wildlife, others on livestock and/or agronomy, while yet others need to combine these activities. The net result may be an expansion or intensification of the interface between wildlife and domestic livestock, which will require innovative control strategies that permit differing types of wildlife/livestock interaction, and that do not threaten the land-use options of neighbours, or the ability of a country to market Animals and Animal products profitably.

Brian D. Perry – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the economic and poverty impacts of Animal Diseases in developing countries new roles new demands for economics and epidemiology
    Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 2011
    Co-Authors: Karl M Rich, Brian D. Perry
    Abstract:

    Animal disease outbreaks pose significant threats to livestock sectors throughout the world, both from the standpoint of the economic impacts of the disease itself and the measures taken to mitigate the risk of disease introduction. These impacts are multidimensional and not always well understood, complicating effective policy response. In the developing world, livestock Diseases have broader, more nuanced effects on markets, poverty, and livelihoods, given the diversity of uses of livestock and complexity of livestock value chains. In both settings, disease control strategies, particularly those informed by ex ante modeling platforms, often fail to recognize the constraints inherent among farmers, veterinary services, and other value chain actors. In short, context matters. Correspondingly, an important gap in the Animal health economics literature is the explicit incorporation of behavior and incentives in impact analyses that highlight the interactions of disease with its socio-economic and institutional setting. In this paper, we examine new approaches and frameworks for the analysis of economic and poverty impacts of Animal Diseases. We propose greater utilization of “bottom-up” analyses, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of value chain and information economics approaches in impact analyses and stressing the importance of improved integration between the epidemiology of disease and its relationships with economic behavior.

  • Pathways out of poverty: a novel typology of Animal Diseases and their impacts
    , 2003
    Co-Authors: Brian D. Perry, Thomas F. Randolph, John J. Mcdermott, Keith R. Sones
    Abstract:

    This paper describes the development of a typology of Animal Diseases that is based on the impacts they have on the poor in the developing world, and advocates the use of this typology in identifying poverty-reducing disease control reseresearch and development opportunities. Introduction Due to the multiplicity of key roles that livestock play in the lives of the poor in most regions of the developing world, Animal Diseases are a significant constraint to poverty reduction, exerting their influence in a variety of different ways. Their impact depends on the importance of the different species affected in the livelihoods of poor societies, in the form of security, financial and social capital, as machines for cultivation, as fertiliser, and of course as nourishment. An accepted clustering of Animal Diseases has been into the four general groups of the endemic, the epidemic (or transboundary), the zoonotic and the food-borne (Perry et al., 2001), but these are not sufficiently specific to the effects of Diseases on poor people to be of value in targeting poverty-reducing disease control reseresearch and development. In this paper, we propose a novel typology of disease impacts on the poor, and in an accompanying poster (Perry et al., 2003) demonstrate the application of this typology to identifying research and development options for poverty reduction.