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Albert Sundrum – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Improving Animal Health on Organic Dairy Farms: Stakeholder Views on Policy Options
    Sustainability, 2020
    Co-Authors: Margret Krieger, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Philip Jones, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Julie Duval, Ulf Emanuelson, Karin Sjöström, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Although ensuring good Animal Health is a stated aim of organic livestock farming and an important reason why consumers purchase organic products, the Health states actually achieved are comparable to those in conventional farming. Unfortunately, there have been no studies to date that have assessed stakeholder views on different policy options for improving Animal Health on organic dairy farms. To address this deficit, stakeholder consultations were conducted in four European countries, involving 39 supply-chain stakeholders (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, inspectors, processors, and retailers). Stakeholders were encouraged to discuss different ways, including policy change, of improving organic Health states. Acknowledging the need for further Health improvements in organic dairy herds, stakeholders generally favoured establishing outcome-oriented Animal Health requirements as a way of achieving this. However, as a result of differing priorities for Animal Health improvement, there was disagreement on questions such as: who should be responsible for assessing Animal Health status on organic farms; and how to define and implement minimum Health requirements. The results of the study suggest that future research must fully explore the opportunities and risks of different policy options and also suggest ways to overcome the divergence of stakeholders’ interests in public debates.

  • KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER REGARDING Animal Health
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Alexandra Bielecke, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Barriers in the process of knowledge transfer in terms of Animal Health have been the topic of a study taking different stakeholder perspectives into account. Using instruments of communication science, the perspectives of farmers, agricultural and veterinarian advisors as well as Animal scientists were brought together and discussed. The process revealed the following obstacles in the transfer of knowledge concerning Animal Health: diverging understanding of Animal Health, complexity of the processes leading to diseases, unclear responsibilities, and role conflicts. We conclude that the current communication structure is not appropriate to enable a targeting transfer of knowledge on the topic of Animal Health. Hence, an impulse from “outside” is required to irritate the deadlocked situation and provide leadership and orientation.

  • Identification of variables affecting Animal Health in European organic dairy farms
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Julie Duval, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Karin Jonasson, Margret Selle, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Improving Animal Health status at herd level relies on the identification of the most effective and efficient control measures considering the complexity of farm specific conditions. The FP7 project IMPRO (impro-dairy.eu) proposes the use of the Impact Matrix (Vester, 2007) as a novel tool for the identification of farm specific opportunities and constraints in Animal Health management of organic farms across Europe. Identifying relevant variables affecting Animal Health is the first step in performing the Impact Matrix and the aim of this study. Five workshops gathering a total of 80 experts in Animal Health on organic dairy farms (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, researchers, and members of dairy associations and the dairy industry) were held in France, Germany, Spain and Sweden to obtain variables through a systemic analysis of the organic dairy farm system. Areas relevant to Animal Health at the farm level were identified by applying participatory methods. Aggregation and structuring led to the nomination of systemrelevant variables whose exact meaning was defined and further explained by a list of indicators. The 4 national lists, exhibiting a great congruence between the total of 81 variables, were deliberated further by a multi-national team of researchers. A pan-European list of 20 variables was established. The following fields (and the number of variables reflecting them) were identified to influence Animal Health: regulations (1), financial and labour resources (2), farmers’ skills, quality of Health monitoring and control (3), availability of advisers (1), genetic potential (1), cow environment (1), adequacy of the diet (3), management of different age groups (2), Animal performance related to milk production, reproduction and Health (3), preventive measures and treatments of diseases (3). The participatory, bottom-up approach was successful in deriving a set of variables covering the variation not only between different farms but also between countries. The obtained variables are the key components of the Impact Matrix and will be used on organic dairy farms to assess opportunities and constraints regarding the improvement of Animal Health. It is our hypothesis that this analysis of the farm system could help the farmer and his advisors to design effective Health control plans.

Didier Torny – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Issues and special features of Animal Health research
    Veterinary research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Christian Ducrot, Bertrand Bed'hom, Vincent Beringue, Jean Baptiste Coulon, Christine Fourichon, Jean-luc Guérin, Stéphane Krebs, Pascal Rainard, Isabelle Schwartz-cornil, Didier Torny
    Abstract:

    In the rapidly changing context of research on Animal Health, INRA launched a collective discussion on the challenges facing the field, its distinguishing features, and synergies with biomedical research. As has been declared forcibly by the heads of WHO, FAO and OIE, the challenges facing Animal Health, beyond diseases transmissible to humans, are critically important and involve food security, agriculture economics, and the ensemble of economic activities associated with agriculture. There are in addition issues related to public Health (zoonoses, xenobiotics, antimicrobial resistance), the environment, and Animal welfare.

  • Issues and special features of Animal Health research
    Veterinary Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Christian Ducrot, Bertrand Bed'hom, Vincent Beringue, Jean Baptiste Coulon, Christine Fourichon, Jean-luc Guérin, Stéphane Krebs, Pascal Rainard, Isabelle Schwartz-cornil, Didier Torny
    Abstract:

    In the rapidly changing context of research on Animal Health, INRA launched a collective discussion on the challenges facing the field, its distinguishing features, and synergies with biomedical research. As has been declared forcibly by the heads of WHO, FAO and OIE, the challenges facing Animal Health, beyond diseases transmissible to humans, are critically important and involve food security, agriculture economics, and the ensemble of economic activities associated with agriculture. There are in addition issues related to public Health (zoonoses, xenobiotics, antimicrobial resistance), the environment, and Animal welfare. Animal Health research is distinguished by particular methodologies and scientific questions that stem from the specific biological features of domestic species and from Animal husbandry practices. It generally does not explore the same scientific questions as research on human biology, even when the same pathogens are being studied, and the discipline is rooted in a very specific agricultural and economic context. Generic and methodological synergies nevertheless exist with biomedical research, particularly with regard to tools and biological models. Certain domestic species furthermore present more functional similarities with humans than laboratory rodents. The singularity of Animal Health research in relation to biomedical research should be taken into account in the organization, evaluation, and funding of the field through a policy that clearly recognizes the specific issues at stake. At the same time, the One Health approach should facilitate closer collaboration between biomedical and Animal Health research at the level of research teams and programmes.

Christian Ducrot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Issues and special features of Animal Health research
    Veterinary research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Christian Ducrot, Bertrand Bed'hom, Vincent Beringue, Jean Baptiste Coulon, Christine Fourichon, Jean-luc Guérin, Stéphane Krebs, Pascal Rainard, Isabelle Schwartz-cornil, Didier Torny
    Abstract:

    In the rapidly changing context of research on Animal Health, INRA launched a collective discussion on the challenges facing the field, its distinguishing features, and synergies with biomedical research. As has been declared forcibly by the heads of WHO, FAO and OIE, the challenges facing Animal Health, beyond diseases transmissible to humans, are critically important and involve food security, agriculture economics, and the ensemble of economic activities associated with agriculture. There are in addition issues related to public Health (zoonoses, xenobiotics, antimicrobial resistance), the environment, and Animal welfare.

  • Issues and special features of Animal Health research
    Veterinary Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Christian Ducrot, Bertrand Bed'hom, Vincent Beringue, Jean Baptiste Coulon, Christine Fourichon, Jean-luc Guérin, Stéphane Krebs, Pascal Rainard, Isabelle Schwartz-cornil, Didier Torny
    Abstract:

    In the rapidly changing context of research on Animal Health, INRA launched a collective discussion on the challenges facing the field, its distinguishing features, and synergies with biomedical research. As has been declared forcibly by the heads of WHO, FAO and OIE, the challenges facing Animal Health, beyond diseases transmissible to humans, are critically important and involve food security, agriculture economics, and the ensemble of economic activities associated with agriculture. There are in addition issues related to public Health (zoonoses, xenobiotics, antimicrobial resistance), the environment, and Animal welfare. Animal Health research is distinguished by particular methodologies and scientific questions that stem from the specific biological features of domestic species and from Animal husbandry practices. It generally does not explore the same scientific questions as research on human biology, even when the same pathogens are being studied, and the discipline is rooted in a very specific agricultural and economic context. Generic and methodological synergies nevertheless exist with biomedical research, particularly with regard to tools and biological models. Certain domestic species furthermore present more functional similarities with humans than laboratory rodents. The singularity of Animal Health research in relation to biomedical research should be taken into account in the organization, evaluation, and funding of the field through a policy that clearly recognizes the specific issues at stake. At the same time, the One Health approach should facilitate closer collaboration between biomedical and Animal Health research at the level of research teams and programmes.

Julie Duval – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Improving Animal Health on Organic Dairy Farms: Stakeholder Views on Policy Options
    Sustainability, 2020
    Co-Authors: Margret Krieger, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Philip Jones, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Julie Duval, Ulf Emanuelson, Karin Sjöström, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Although ensuring good Animal Health is a stated aim of organic livestock farming and an important reason why consumers purchase organic products, the Health states actually achieved are comparable to those in conventional farming. Unfortunately, there have been no studies to date that have assessed stakeholder views on different policy options for improving Animal Health on organic dairy farms. To address this deficit, stakeholder consultations were conducted in four European countries, involving 39 supply-chain stakeholders (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, inspectors, processors, and retailers). Stakeholders were encouraged to discuss different ways, including policy change, of improving organic Health states. Acknowledging the need for further Health improvements in organic dairy herds, stakeholders generally favoured establishing outcome-oriented Animal Health requirements as a way of achieving this. However, as a result of differing priorities for Animal Health improvement, there was disagreement on questions such as: who should be responsible for assessing Animal Health status on organic farms; and how to define and implement minimum Health requirements. The results of the study suggest that future research must fully explore the opportunities and risks of different policy options and also suggest ways to overcome the divergence of stakeholders’ interests in public debates.

  • Identification of variables affecting Animal Health in European organic dairy farms
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Julie Duval, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Karin Jonasson, Margret Selle, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Improving Animal Health status at herd level relies on the identification of the most effective and efficient control measures considering the complexity of farm specific conditions. The FP7 project IMPRO (impro-dairy.eu) proposes the use of the Impact Matrix (Vester, 2007) as a novel tool for the identification of farm specific opportunities and constraints in Animal Health management of organic farms across Europe. Identifying relevant variables affecting Animal Health is the first step in performing the Impact Matrix and the aim of this study. Five workshops gathering a total of 80 experts in Animal Health on organic dairy farms (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, researchers, and members of dairy associations and the dairy industry) were held in France, Germany, Spain and Sweden to obtain variables through a systemic analysis of the organic dairy farm system. Areas relevant to Animal Health at the farm level were identified by applying participatory methods. Aggregation and structuring led to the nomination of systemrelevant variables whose exact meaning was defined and further explained by a list of indicators. The 4 national lists, exhibiting a great congruence between the total of 81 variables, were deliberated further by a multi-national team of researchers. A pan-European list of 20 variables was established. The following fields (and the number of variables reflecting them) were identified to influence Animal Health: regulations (1), financial and labour resources (2), farmers’ skills, quality of Health monitoring and control (3), availability of advisers (1), genetic potential (1), cow environment (1), adequacy of the diet (3), management of different age groups (2), Animal performance related to milk production, reproduction and Health (3), preventive measures and treatments of diseases (3). The participatory, bottom-up approach was successful in deriving a set of variables covering the variation not only between different farms but also between countries. The obtained variables are the key components of the Impact Matrix and will be used on organic dairy farms to assess opportunities and constraints regarding the improvement of Animal Health. It is our hypothesis that this analysis of the farm system could help the farmer and his advisors to design effective Health control plans.

Isabel Blanco-penedo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Improving Animal Health on Organic Dairy Farms: Stakeholder Views on Policy Options
    Sustainability, 2020
    Co-Authors: Margret Krieger, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Philip Jones, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Julie Duval, Ulf Emanuelson, Karin Sjöström, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Although ensuring good Animal Health is a stated aim of organic livestock farming and an important reason why consumers purchase organic products, the Health states actually achieved are comparable to those in conventional farming. Unfortunately, there have been no studies to date that have assessed stakeholder views on different policy options for improving Animal Health on organic dairy farms. To address this deficit, stakeholder consultations were conducted in four European countries, involving 39 supply-chain stakeholders (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, inspectors, processors, and retailers). Stakeholders were encouraged to discuss different ways, including policy change, of improving organic Health states. Acknowledging the need for further Health improvements in organic dairy herds, stakeholders generally favoured establishing outcome-oriented Animal Health requirements as a way of achieving this. However, as a result of differing priorities for Animal Health improvement, there was disagreement on questions such as: who should be responsible for assessing Animal Health status on organic farms; and how to define and implement minimum Health requirements. The results of the study suggest that future research must fully explore the opportunities and risks of different policy options and also suggest ways to overcome the divergence of stakeholders’ interests in public debates.

  • Identification of variables affecting Animal Health in European organic dairy farms
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Julie Duval, Susanne Hoischen-taubner, Isabel Blanco-penedo, Karin Jonasson, Margret Selle, Albert Sundrum
    Abstract:

    Improving Animal Health status at herd level relies on the identification of the most effective and efficient control measures considering the complexity of farm specific conditions. The FP7 project IMPRO (impro-dairy.eu) proposes the use of the Impact Matrix (Vester, 2007) as a novel tool for the identification of farm specific opportunities and constraints in Animal Health management of organic farms across Europe. Identifying relevant variables affecting Animal Health is the first step in performing the Impact Matrix and the aim of this study. Five workshops gathering a total of 80 experts in Animal Health on organic dairy farms (farmers, advisors, veterinarians, researchers, and members of dairy associations and the dairy industry) were held in France, Germany, Spain and Sweden to obtain variables through a systemic analysis of the organic dairy farm system. Areas relevant to Animal Health at the farm level were identified by applying participatory methods. Aggregation and structuring led to the nomination of systemrelevant variables whose exact meaning was defined and further explained by a list of indicators. The 4 national lists, exhibiting a great congruence between the total of 81 variables, were deliberated further by a multi-national team of researchers. A pan-European list of 20 variables was established. The following fields (and the number of variables reflecting them) were identified to influence Animal Health: regulations (1), financial and labour resources (2), farmers’ skills, quality of Health monitoring and control (3), availability of advisers (1), genetic potential (1), cow environment (1), adequacy of the diet (3), management of different age groups (2), Animal performance related to milk production, reproduction and Health (3), preventive measures and treatments of diseases (3). The participatory, bottom-up approach was successful in deriving a set of variables covering the variation not only between different farms but also between countries. The obtained variables are the key components of the Impact Matrix and will be used on organic dairy farms to assess opportunities and constraints regarding the improvement of Animal Health. It is our hypothesis that this analysis of the farm system could help the farmer and his advisors to design effective Health control plans.