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Animal Lactation

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Martin Wiedmann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Listeria monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle shows high levels of day-to-day variation and includes outbreaks and sporadic cases of shedding of specific L. monocytogenes subtypes.
    Preventive veterinary medicine, 2007
    Co-Authors: Renata Ivanek, Yrjö T. Gröhn, Kendra K. Nightingale, Martin Wiedmann
    Abstract:

    Fecal shedding of Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk for contamination of Animal feed and agricultural environments and raw food at the pre-harvest stages of food production. To be able to reduce these risks it is critical to improve understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes shedding in feces. The objective of this study was to assess the daily variability of fecal shedding and its association with individual Animal (Lactation number and the day of current Lactation) and environmental (feed) risk factors. That was achieved by application of longitudinal daily sample collection in a herd of dairy cattle and molecular characterization of isolated L. monocytogenes. Fecal samples (25) and silage samples (2) were collected daily during two 2-week periods and one 5-day period. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 255 out of 825 (31%) fecal samples on 24 out of 33 (73%) days, and from 25 out of 66 (38%) silage samples on 16 out of 33 (48%) days. Ninety-four percent of cows excreted L. monocytogenes in feces at least once during the study period. Our data analyses indicated that (i) the prevalence and incidence risk of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle vary considerably over time, from 0 to 100%, and both are associated with contamination of silage, (ii) L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle could occur as part of an outbreak or as an isolated sporadic case, (iii) L. monocytogenes subtypes associated with human infections are commonly isolated from cattle feces and silage, and (iv) a single cow can harbor more than one L. monocytogenes subtype on any given day. Although limited to a single dairy cattle herd, these findings provide a significant advancement in the understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle.

Esa Mäntysaari – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Modeling of daily body weights and body weight changes of Nordic Red cows.
    Journal of dairy science, 2015
    Co-Authors: Päivi Mäntysaari, Esa Mäntysaari
    Abstract:

    Increased availability of automated weighing systems have made it possible to record massive amounts of body weight (BW) data in a short time. If the BW measurement is unbiased, the changes in BW reflect the energy status of the cow and can be used for management or breeding purposes. The usefulness of the BW data depends on the reliability of the measures. The noise in BW measurements can be smoothed by fitting a parametric or time series model into the BW measurements. This study examined the accuracy of different models to predict BW of the cows based on daily BW measurements and investigated the usefulness of modeling in increasing the value of BW measurements as management and breeding tools. Data included daily BW measurements, production, and intake from 230 Nordic Red dairy cows. The BW of the cows was recorded twice a day on their return from milking. In total, the data included 50,594 daily observations with 98,418 BW measurements. A clear diurnal change was present in the BW of the cows even if they had feed available 24 h. The daily average BW were used in the modeling. Five different models were tested: (1) a cow-wise fixed second-order polynomial regression model (FiX) including the exponential Wilmink term, (2) a random regression model with fixed and random Animal Lactation stage functions (MiX), (3) MiX with 13 periods of weighing added (PER), (4) natural cubic smoothing splines with 8 equally spaced knots (SPk8), and (5) spline model with no restriction on knots but a smoothing parameter corresponding to a fit of 5 degrees of freedom (SPdf5). In the original measured BW data, the within-Animal variation was 6.4% of the total variance. Modeling decreased the within Animal variation to levels of 2.9 to 5.1%. The smallest day-to-day variation and thereafter highest day-to-day repeatabilities were with PER and MiX models. The usability of modeled BW as energy balance (EB) indicator were evaluated by estimating relationships between EB, or EB indicators, and modeled BW change. In all cases the modeling increased the correlation and thus the reliability of the BW measurements. From all of the tested models, the best predictive value was attained by the random regression model with fixed and random Animal Lactation stage functions. Based on results, modeling of BW significantly increases the usefulness of BW as an EB predictor and management indicator.

Renata Ivanek – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Listeria monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle shows high levels of day-to-day variation and includes outbreaks and sporadic cases of shedding of specific L. monocytogenes subtypes.
    Preventive veterinary medicine, 2007
    Co-Authors: Renata Ivanek, Yrjö T. Gröhn, Kendra K. Nightingale, Martin Wiedmann
    Abstract:

    Fecal shedding of Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk for contamination of Animal feed and agricultural environments and raw food at the pre-harvest stages of food production. To be able to reduce these risks it is critical to improve understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes shedding in feces. The objective of this study was to assess the daily variability of fecal shedding and its association with individual Animal (Lactation number and the day of current Lactation) and environmental (feed) risk factors. That was achieved by application of longitudinal daily sample collection in a herd of dairy cattle and molecular characterization of isolated L. monocytogenes. Fecal samples (25) and silage samples (2) were collected daily during two 2-week periods and one 5-day period. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 255 out of 825 (31%) fecal samples on 24 out of 33 (73%) days, and from 25 out of 66 (38%) silage samples on 16 out of 33 (48%) days. Ninety-four percent of cows excreted L. monocytogenes in feces at least once during the study period. Our data analyses indicated that (i) the prevalence and incidence risk of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle vary considerably over time, from 0 to 100%, and both are associated with contamination of silage, (ii) L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle could occur as part of an outbreak or as an isolated sporadic case, (iii) L. monocytogenes subtypes associated with human infections are commonly isolated from cattle feces and silage, and (iv) a single cow can harbor more than one L. monocytogenes subtype on any given day. Although limited to a single dairy cattle herd, these findings provide a significant advancement in the understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle.

Päivi Mäntysaari – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Modeling of daily body weights and body weight changes of Nordic Red cows.
    Journal of dairy science, 2015
    Co-Authors: Päivi Mäntysaari, Esa Mäntysaari
    Abstract:

    Increased availability of automated weighing systems have made it possible to record massive amounts of body weight (BW) data in a short time. If the BW measurement is unbiased, the changes in BW reflect the energy status of the cow and can be used for management or breeding purposes. The usefulness of the BW data depends on the reliability of the measures. The noise in BW measurements can be smoothed by fitting a parametric or time series model into the BW measurements. This study examined the accuracy of different models to predict BW of the cows based on daily BW measurements and investigated the usefulness of modeling in increasing the value of BW measurements as management and breeding tools. Data included daily BW measurements, production, and intake from 230 Nordic Red dairy cows. The BW of the cows was recorded twice a day on their return from milking. In total, the data included 50,594 daily observations with 98,418 BW measurements. A clear diurnal change was present in the BW of the cows even if they had feed available 24 h. The daily average BW were used in the modeling. Five different models were tested: (1) a cow-wise fixed second-order polynomial regression model (FiX) including the exponential Wilmink term, (2) a random regression model with fixed and random Animal Lactation stage functions (MiX), (3) MiX with 13 periods of weighing added (PER), (4) natural cubic smoothing splines with 8 equally spaced knots (SPk8), and (5) spline model with no restriction on knots but a smoothing parameter corresponding to a fit of 5 degrees of freedom (SPdf5). In the original measured BW data, the within-Animal variation was 6.4% of the total variance. Modeling decreased the within Animal variation to levels of 2.9 to 5.1%. The smallest day-to-day variation and thereafter highest day-to-day repeatabilities were with PER and MiX models. The usability of modeled BW as energy balance (EB) indicator were evaluated by estimating relationships between EB, or EB indicators, and modeled BW change. In all cases the modeling increased the correlation and thus the reliability of the BW measurements. From all of the tested models, the best predictive value was attained by the random regression model with fixed and random Animal Lactation stage functions. Based on results, modeling of BW significantly increases the usefulness of BW as an EB predictor and management indicator.

Kendra K. Nightingale – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Listeria monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle shows high levels of day-to-day variation and includes outbreaks and sporadic cases of shedding of specific L. monocytogenes subtypes.
    Preventive veterinary medicine, 2007
    Co-Authors: Renata Ivanek, Yrjö T. Gröhn, Kendra K. Nightingale, Martin Wiedmann
    Abstract:

    Fecal shedding of Listeria monocytogenes poses a risk for contamination of Animal feed and agricultural environments and raw food at the pre-harvest stages of food production. To be able to reduce these risks it is critical to improve understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes shedding in feces. The objective of this study was to assess the daily variability of fecal shedding and its association with individual Animal (Lactation number and the day of current Lactation) and environmental (feed) risk factors. That was achieved by application of longitudinal daily sample collection in a herd of dairy cattle and molecular characterization of isolated L. monocytogenes. Fecal samples (25) and silage samples (2) were collected daily during two 2-week periods and one 5-day period. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 255 out of 825 (31%) fecal samples on 24 out of 33 (73%) days, and from 25 out of 66 (38%) silage samples on 16 out of 33 (48%) days. Ninety-four percent of cows excreted L. monocytogenes in feces at least once during the study period. Our data analyses indicated that (i) the prevalence and incidence risk of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle vary considerably over time, from 0 to 100%, and both are associated with contamination of silage, (ii) L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in cattle could occur as part of an outbreak or as an isolated sporadic case, (iii) L. monocytogenes subtypes associated with human infections are commonly isolated from cattle feces and silage, and (iv) a single cow can harbor more than one L. monocytogenes subtype on any given day. Although limited to a single dairy cattle herd, these findings provide a significant advancement in the understanding of the epidemiology of L. monocytogenes fecal shedding in dairy cattle.