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Animal Production System

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Nicole Darmon – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Integrating nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links when identifying sustainable diets: How low should we reduce meat consumption?
    PLoS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tangui Barre, Marlene Perignon, Rozenn Gazan, Florent Vieux, Valerie Micard, Marie-josephe Amiot, Nicole Darmon

    Abstract:

    Background Reducing the consumption of meat and other Animal-based products is widely advocated to improve the sustainability of diets in high-income countries. However, such reduction may impair nutritional adequacy, since the bioavailability of key nutrients is higher when they come from Animal-vs plant-based foods. Meat reduction may also affect the balance between foods co-produced within the same Animal Production System. Objective The objective was to assess the impact of introducing nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links considerations on the dietary changes needed -especially regarding meat – to improve diet sustainability. Methods Diet optimization with linear and non-linear programming was used to design, for each gender, three modeled diets departing the least from the mean observed French diet (OBS) while reducing by at least 30% the diet-related environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, eutrophication, acidification): i) in the nutrition-environment (NE) model, the fulfillment of recommended dietary allowances for all nutrients was imposed; ii) in the NE-bioavailability (NEB) model, nutritional adequacy was further ensured by accounting for iron, zinc, protein and provitamin A bioavailability; iii) in the NEB-co-Production (NEB-CP) model, two links between co-produced Animal foods (milk +/- beef and blood sausage +/- pork) were additionally included into the models by proportionally co-constraining their respective quantities. The price and environmental impacts of individual foods were assumed to be constant. Results `Fruit and vegetables’ and `Starches’ quantities increased in all modeled diets compared to OBS. In parallel, total meat and ruminant meat quantities decreased. Starting from 110g/d women’s OBS diet (168g/d for men), total meat quantity decreased by 78%, 67% and 32% for women (68%, 66% and 62% for men) in NE, NEB and NEB-CP diets, respectively. Starting from 36g/d women’s OBS diet (54g/d for men), ruminant meat quantity dropped severely by 84% and 87% in NE and NEB diets for women (80% and 78% for men), whereas it only decreased by 27% in NEB-CP diets (38% for men). The share of energy and proteins of Animal origin was similar for the 3 modeled diets (approximately 1/5 of total energy, and 1/2 of protein) and lower than in OBS diet (approximately 1/3 of total energy, and 2/3 of protein). Conclusions Decreasing meat content was strictly needed to achieve more sustainable diets for French adults, but the reduction was less severe when nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links were taken into account.

Fusuo Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • nitrogen mass flow in china s Animal Production System and environmental implications
    Journal of Environmental Quality, 2010
    Co-Authors: Fanghao Wang, J T Sims, Fusuo Zhang

    Abstract:

    China’s economic boom in recent decades has stimulated consumer demand for Animal products and consequently, a vast expansion in Animal Production. From 1978 to 2006, the number of Animals increased by 322% for pigs, 209% for poultry, and 2770% for dairy cattle. The objective of the present study was to quantify nitrogen mass flow in China’s Animal Production System at the national scale and to elucidate potential environmental implications. A comprehensive analysis was performed combining statistical records with data from the scientific literature and supplemental survey information. Results indicate that approximately 18 Mt of N flowed through the Chinese Animal Production System in 2006. Nitrogen input to the System was from various feed materials, including 6.8 Mt (38% of total) from roughage, 4.4 Mt (24%) from byproducts, 2.3 Mt (13%) from cereal grains, and 1.6 Mt (9%) each from crop residues and oilseed cakes, with the remaining N (16%) obtained from other feedstuffs. Nitrogen outputs from the System included edible Animal products (2.4 t, 13% of total), nonedible Animal parts (e.g., bones, skins) (3.8 Mt, 21%), and excreta (12 Mt, 66%). At the national level, the excreta would average 28 Mg (as excreted) and 90 kg N ha(-1) of cropland. However, at the provincial level, it varied from 1 Mg ha(-1) (5 kg N ha(-1)) in Qinghai to 97 Mg ha(-1) (243 kg N ha(-1)) in Sichuan. In regions with excreta in the intermediate rate (e.g., Hebei Province, 115 kg N ha(-1)) or high rare (e.g., Sichuan Province, 243 kg N ha(-1)), Animal manure contributes significantly to nutrients polluting groundwater and/or surface waters. It is crucial for China to develop and implement proper management practices to maximum the beneficial use of the 12 Mt excreta N while minimizing its environmental footprint.

Tangui Barre – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Integrating nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links when identifying sustainable diets: How low should we reduce meat consumption?
    PLoS ONE, 2018
    Co-Authors: Tangui Barre, Marlene Perignon, Rozenn Gazan, Florent Vieux, Valerie Micard, Marie-josephe Amiot, Nicole Darmon

    Abstract:

    Background Reducing the consumption of meat and other Animal-based products is widely advocated to improve the sustainability of diets in high-income countries. However, such reduction may impair nutritional adequacy, since the bioavailability of key nutrients is higher when they come from Animal-vs plant-based foods. Meat reduction may also affect the balance between foods co-produced within the same Animal Production System. Objective The objective was to assess the impact of introducing nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links considerations on the dietary changes needed -especially regarding meat – to improve diet sustainability. Methods Diet optimization with linear and non-linear programming was used to design, for each gender, three modeled diets departing the least from the mean observed French diet (OBS) while reducing by at least 30% the diet-related environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, eutrophication, acidification): i) in the nutrition-environment (NE) model, the fulfillment of recommended dietary allowances for all nutrients was imposed; ii) in the NE-bioavailability (NEB) model, nutritional adequacy was further ensured by accounting for iron, zinc, protein and provitamin A bioavailability; iii) in the NEB-co-Production (NEB-CP) model, two links between co-produced Animal foods (milk +/- beef and blood sausage +/- pork) were additionally included into the models by proportionally co-constraining their respective quantities. The price and environmental impacts of individual foods were assumed to be constant. Results `Fruit and vegetables’ and `Starches’ quantities increased in all modeled diets compared to OBS. In parallel, total meat and ruminant meat quantities decreased. Starting from 110g/d women’s OBS diet (168g/d for men), total meat quantity decreased by 78%, 67% and 32% for women (68%, 66% and 62% for men) in NE, NEB and NEB-CP diets, respectively. Starting from 36g/d women’s OBS diet (54g/d for men), ruminant meat quantity dropped severely by 84% and 87% in NE and NEB diets for women (80% and 78% for men), whereas it only decreased by 27% in NEB-CP diets (38% for men). The share of energy and proteins of Animal origin was similar for the 3 modeled diets (approximately 1/5 of total energy, and 1/2 of protein) and lower than in OBS diet (approximately 1/3 of total energy, and 2/3 of protein). Conclusions Decreasing meat content was strictly needed to achieve more sustainable diets for French adults, but the reduction was less severe when nutrient bioavailability and co-Production links were taken into account.