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Animal Tissue

The Experts below are selected from a list of 279 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Richard M. Caprioli – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • direct molecular analysis of whole body Animal Tissue sections by imaging maldi mass spectrometry
    Analytical Chemistry, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sheerin Khatibshahidi, Jennifer L Herman, Malin Andersson, Todd A. Gillespie, Richard M. Caprioli

    Abstract:

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) that utilizes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technology can provide a molecular ex vivo view of resected organs or whole-body sections from an Animal, making possible the label-free tracking of both endogenous and exogenous compounds with spatial resolution and molecular specificity. Drug distribution and, for the first time, individual metabolite distributions within whole-body Tissue sections can be detected simultaneously at various time points following drug administration. IMS analysis of Tissues from 8 mg/kg olanzapine dosed rats revealed temporal distribution of the drug and metabolites that correlate to previous quantitative whole-body autoradiography studies. Whole-body MALDI IMS is further extended to detecting proteins from organs present in a whole-body sagittal Tissue section. This technology will significantly help advance the analysis of novel therapeutics and may provide deeper insight into therapeutic and toxicological processes, reveal…

  • Direct molecular analysis of whole-body Animal Tissue sections by imaging MALDI mass spectrometry
    Analytical Chemistry, 2006
    Co-Authors: Sheerin Khatib-shahidi, Malin Andersson, Jennifer L Herman, Todd A. Gillespie, Richard M. Caprioli

    Abstract:

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) that utilizes matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technology can provide a molecular ex vivo view of resected organs or whole-body sections from an Animal, making possible the label-free tracking of both endogenous and exogenous compounds with spatial resolution and molecular specificity. Drug distribution and, for the first time, individual metabolite distributions within whole-body Tissue sections can be detected simultaneously at various time points following drug administration. IMS analysis of Tissues from 8 mg/kg olanzapine dosed rats revealed temporal distribution of the drug and metabolites that correlate to previous quantitative whole-body autoradiography studies. Whole-body MALDI IMS is further extended to detecting proteins from organs present in a whole-body sagittal Tissue section. This technology will significantly help advance the analysis of novel therapeutics and may provide deeper insight into therapeutic and toxicological processes, revealing at the molecular level the cause of efficacy or side effects often associated with drug administration.

Maher Salloum – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • an in vivo experimental study of temperature elevations in Animal Tissue during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia
    International Journal of Hyperthermia, 2008
    Co-Authors: Maher Salloum

    Abstract:

    In magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia in cancer treatment, the local blood perfusion rate and the amount of nanofluid delivered to the target region are important factors determining the temperature distribution in Tissue. In this study, we evaluate the effects of these factors on the heating pattern and temperature elevations in the muscle Tissue of rat hind limbs induced by intramuscular injections of magnetic nanoparticles during in vivo experiments. Temperature distribution in the vicinity of the injection site is measured inside the rat limb after the nanoparticle hyperthermia. The measured temperature elevations at the injection site are 3.5° ± 1.8°C and 6.02° ± 0.8°C above the measured body temperature, when the injection amount is 0.1 cc and 0.2 cc, respectively. The full width of half maximum (FWHM) of the temperature elevation, an index of heat transfer in the radial direction from the injection site is found to be approximately 31 mm for both injection amounts. The temperature measurements, tog…

  • an in vivo experimental study of temperature elevations in Animal Tissue during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia
    ASME 2008 Summer Bioengineering Conference Parts A and B, 2008
    Co-Authors: Maher Salloum

    Abstract:

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia has potential to achieve optimal therapeutic results due to its ability to deliver adequate heating power to irregular and/or deep-seated tumor at low magnetic field frequency and amplitude [1]. Iron oxides magnetite Fe3O4 and maghemite γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are the most studied to date [2] due to their biocompatibilty [3] for hyperthermia application. The heat generated by the particles when exposed to an external alternating magnetic field is mainly due to the Neel relaxation mechanism and/or Brownian motion of the particles [4]. The superparamagnetic particles (10–40 nm) are recommended in clinical application as they are able to generate substantial heat within a small magnetic field strength and frequency [5].Copyright © 2008 by ASME

Bryn Shurmer – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • multiclass multiresidue drug analysis including aminoglycosides in Animal Tissue using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2010
    Co-Authors: Perry Martos, Fiona Jayasundara, Jessica Dolbeer, Louise Spilsbury, Mark Mitchell, Carolina Varilla, Bryn Shurmer

    Abstract:

    A multiresidue, multiclass semiquantitative screening analysis of 39 drug residues covering 8 drug classes, including aminoglycosides in veal muscle, based on a single multiresidue extraction routine and using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), is presented. Sample preparation involves extraction of a 5 g diced Tissue sample with 10 mL of acetonitrile/ water (86:14), incubated at 60 °C for 1 h, and then cooled for 10 min in ice. Formic acid is added to the suspension, then mixed, and centrifuged. The supernatant is retained, and the pellet is extracted with 10 mL of water for aminoglycosides and again centrifuged. Approximately 9.5 mL of each of the supernatants from both extracts is combined and diluted with water to 25 mL. The final solution is then defatted with 20 mL of hexane prior to analysis. Liquid chromatography for the aminoglycosides is carried out with ZIC-HILIC and for the remainder of the compounds with an Atlant…