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Anisopteromalus calandrae

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Man-qun Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transgenic cry1c gene rough rice line t1c 19 does not change the host preferences of the non target stored product pest rhyzopertha dominica fabricius coleoptera bostrichidae and its parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae howard hymenoptera pterom
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 2015
    Co-Authors: Xiao Sun, Miao-jun Yan, Aijun Zhang, Man-qun Wang

    Abstract:

    Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C(⁎) gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae.

  • Transgenic cry1C(⁎) gene rough rice line T1C-19 does not change the host preferences of the non-target stored product pest, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and its parasitoid wasp, Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hyme
    Ecotoxicology and environmental safety, 2015
    Co-Authors: Xiao Sun, Miao-jun Yan, Aijun Zhang, Man-qun Wang

    Abstract:

    Abstract Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C⁎ gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC–MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae.

Xiao Sun – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transgenic cry1c gene rough rice line t1c 19 does not change the host preferences of the non target stored product pest rhyzopertha dominica fabricius coleoptera bostrichidae and its parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae howard hymenoptera pterom
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 2015
    Co-Authors: Xiao Sun, Miao-jun Yan, Aijun Zhang, Man-qun Wang

    Abstract:

    Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C(⁎) gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae.

  • Transgenic cry1C(⁎) gene rough rice line T1C-19 does not change the host preferences of the non-target stored product pest, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), and its parasitoid wasp, Anisopteromalus calandrae (Howard) (Hyme
    Ecotoxicology and environmental safety, 2015
    Co-Authors: Xiao Sun, Miao-jun Yan, Aijun Zhang, Man-qun Wang

    Abstract:

    Abstract Rough rice grains are often stored for extended periods before they are used or consumed. However, during storage, the rough rice is vulnerable to insect infestation, resulting in significant economic loss. Previous studies have shown that volatiles cues, physical characteristics, and taste chemicals on the grains could be the important key behavior factors for storage insect pests to locate the hosts and select oviposition sites. It is also well known that the transgenic Bt rough rice line T1C-19, which expresses a cry1C⁎ gene has a high resistance to Lepidoptera pests. However, there were no evidences to show the consequences of host preference for non-target insect pests after growing Bt transgenic rice. In this study, the potential key factors of Bt rough rice were investigated for their impacts on the behaviors of non-target pest lesser grain borer Rhyzopertha dominica, the main weevil pest of grain and its parasitic wasps Anisopteromalus calandrae, the natural enemy of the beetle. Both electronic nose and electronic tongue analyses showed that the parameters of Bt rough rice were analogous to those of the non-Bt rough rice. The volatile profiles of Bt and non-Bt rough rice examined by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GC–MS) were similar. For most volatile compounds, there were no significantly quantitative differences in compound quantities between Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The densities of sclereids and trichomes on the rough rice husk surface were statistically equal in Bt and non-Bt rough rice. The non-target pest, R. dominica, and its parasitoid wasp, A. calandrae, were attracted to both rough rice and could not distinguish the transgenic T1C-19 from the isogenic rough rice. These results demonstrated that Bt rough rice has no negative impacts on the host preference behaviors of non-target stored product pest R. dominica and its parasitoid A. calandrae.

Jun Abe – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Sperm-limited males continue to mate, but females cannot detect the male state in a parasitoid wasp
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jun Abe

    Abstract:

    Female mating frequency and male ejaculate allocation are likely to interact. Females may adjust their propensity for remating based on the amount of provided sperm to ensure a sufficient sperm supply, and males may determine sperm allocation based on female availability and female mating frequency. In this study, I investigated male and female mating behaviors in the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae. The wasp exhibits the haplo-diploid sex determination, in which sperm-depleted females are constrained to produce only sons by laying unfertilized eggs. The first experiment showed that a rapid succession of male mating decreased the production of daughters (fertilized eggs) by the inseminated females, suggesting that sperm-limited males provided an insufficient amount of sperm to the females. Although the males appeared to replenish their sperm store after 6 h, they mated upon encountering females despite their sperm shortage. The second experiment showed that copulation reduced the subsequent mating receptivity of the inseminated females irrespective of whether the females received a sufficient amount of sperm. Moreover, although approximately 26% of females accepted a second mating and recovered a certain degree of daughter production, remating was independent of the mating status of their first mating partner or the social environment. These results suggest that sperm-limited males may benefit from continuing to mate because their copulation prevents competing males from reproducing with their mates. Females incur a cost from not remating depending on the amount of sperm provided, which may result from weak environmental selection pressure or manipulation by the initial mate. Male and female mating strategies are likely to evolve interdependently. Specifically, in species that produce limited numbers of sperm, the mating behavior of males and females is likely to be influenced by sperm transfer. The results of the present study suggest that males of the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae can replenish their sperm stores over time. However, sperm-limited males that encounter a potential mating partner mate rather than wait for sperm recovery. Females do not discriminate the male state before copulation, and those that mate with sperm-limited males suffer from sperm shortage. Although females can augment their sperm supply by remating, only a portion of females do so, regardless of sperm supply. The lack of a female facultative response suggests weak environmental selection on the species or the existence of sexual conflict over sperm transfer.

  • Sperm-limited males continue to mate, but females cannot detect the male state in a parasitoid wasp
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Jun Abe

    Abstract:

    Female mating frequency and male ejaculate allocation are likely to interact. Females may adjust their propensity for remating based on the amount of provided sperm to ensure a sufficient sperm supply, and males may determine sperm allocation based on female availability and female mating frequency. In this study, I investigated male and female mating behaviors in the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae . The wasp exhibits the haplo-diploid sex determination, in which sperm-depleted females are constrained to produce only sons by laying unfertilized eggs. The first experiment showed that a rapid succession of male mating decreased the production of daughters (fertilized eggs) by the inseminated females, suggesting that sperm-limited males provided an insufficient amount of sperm to the females. Although the males appeared to replenish their sperm store after 6 h, they mated upon encountering females despite their sperm shortage. The second experiment showed that copulation reduced the subsequent mating receptivity of the inseminated females irrespective of whether the females received a sufficient amount of sperm. Moreover, although approximately 26% of females accepted a second mating and recovered a certain degree of daughter production, remating was independent of the mating status of their first mating partner or the social environment. These results suggest that sperm-limited males may benefit from continuing to mate because their copulation prevents competing males from reproducing with their mates. Females incur a cost from not remating depending on the amount of sperm provided, which may result from weak environmental selection pressure or manipulation by the initial mate. Significance statement Male and female mating strategies are likely to evolve interdependently. Specifically, in species that produce limited numbers of sperm, the mating behavior of males and females is likely to be influenced by sperm transfer. The results of the present study suggest that males of the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae can replenish their sperm stores over time. However, sperm-limited males that encounter a potential mating partner mate rather than wait for sperm recovery. Females do not discriminate the male state before copulation, and those that mate with sperm-limited males suffer from sperm shortage. Although females can augment their sperm supply by remating, only a portion of females do so, regardless of sperm supply. The lack of a female facultative response suggests weak environmental selection on the species or the existence of sexual conflict over sperm transfer.

  • Influence of body size on fecundity and sperm management in the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae
    Physiological Entomology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Eiichi Kasamatsu, Jun Abe

    Abstract:

    A large body size is considered to be advantageous to the reproductive success of females as a result of several factors, such as the allocation of more resources to reproduction and the efficient management of sperm transferred by males. In the present study, the effects of female body size, female mating status and additional food availability on fecundity and the offspring sex ratio are investigated in the parasitoid wasp Anisopteromalus calandrae Howard (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Because of haplodiploid sex determination, females must fertilize eggs to produce female offspring but not to produce male offspring. As predicted, female fecundity and the number of female offspring are positively correlated with body size. However, although the volume of the spermatheca increases with female body size, the amount of sperm stored in the spermatheca is relatively constant, irrespective of body size. Consequently, larger females produce a greater proportion of male offspring, especially at the end of the oviposition sequence, suggesting that larger females that possess more resources for reproduction and produce a larger number of offspring are more likely to suffer sperm depletion. The results of the present study also show that mated females have an increased fecundity compared with virgin females, although the opportunity to feed on honey along with host feeding has no impact upon fecundity or the sex ratio.