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Anonymity Online

The Experts below are selected from a list of 180 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Deede Gammon – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Combining Online and offline peer support groups in community mental health care settings: a qualitative study of service users’ experiences
    International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 2020
    Co-Authors: Monica Strand, Deede Gammon

    Abstract:

    Background Peer support for people with long-term mental health problems is central to recovery-oriented approaches in mental health care. Peer support has traditionally been conducted offline in face-to-face groups, while Online groups on the Internet have increased rapidly. Offline and Online peer support groups are shown to have differing strengths and weaknesses. However, little is known about how combining the two formats might be experienced by service users, which this paper aims to illuminate. Methods In this exploratory and descriptive study, a recovery-oriented Internet-based portal called ReConnect was used by service users in two mental health communities in Norway for 6–12 months. The portal included an Online peer support group which also facilitated participation in local offline peer support groups. Both group formats were moderated by an employed service user consultant. Qualitative data about service users’ experiences were collected through focus groups and individual interviews and inductively analyzed thematically. Results A total of 14 female service users 22–67 years of age with various diagnoses participated in three focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Two main themes were identified: (1) balancing Anonymity and openness, and (2) enabling connectedness. These themes are further illustrated with the subthemes: (i) dilemmas of Anonymity and confidentiality, (ii) towards self-disclosure and openness, (iii) new friendships, and (iv) networks in the local community. Three of the subthemes mainly describe benefits, while challenges were more implicit and cut across the subthemes. Identified challenges were related to transitions from Anonymity Online to revealing one’s identity offline, confidentiality, and barriers related to participation in offline peer support groups. Conclusions This study suggests that Online and offline peer support groups complement each other, and that combining them is mainly described as beneficial by service users. Identified benefits appeared to arise from service users’ options of one format or the other, or that they could combine formats in ways that suited their individual values and comfort zones. Moderation by a trained service user consultant appeared essential for both formats and can be used systematically to address identified challenges. Combining Online and offline peer support groups is a promising concept for facilitating recovery-oriented care and warrants continued research.

  • Combining Online and offline peer support groups in community mental health care settings: a qualitative study of service users’ experiences.
    International journal of mental health systems, 2020
    Co-Authors: Monica Strand, Deede Gammon

    Abstract:

    Peer support for people with long-term mental health problems is central to recovery-oriented approaches in mental health care. Peer support has traditionally been conducted offline in face-to-face groups, while Online groups on the Internet have increased rapidly. Offline and Online peer support groups are shown to have differing strengths and weaknesses. However, little is known about how combining the two formats might be experienced by service users, which this paper aims to illuminate.
    In this exploratory and descriptive study, a recovery-oriented Internet-based portal called ReConnect was used by service users in two mental health communities in Norway for 6-12 months. The portal included an Online peer support group which also facilitated participation in local offline peer support groups. Both group formats were moderated by an employed service user consultant. Qualitative data about service users’ experiences were collected through focus groups and individual interviews and inductively analyzed thematically.
    A total of 14 female service users 22-67 years of age with various diagnoses participated in three focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Two main themes were identified: (1) balancing Anonymity and openness, and (2) enabling connectedness. These themes are further illustrated with the subthemes: (i) dilemmas of Anonymity and confidentiality, (ii) towards self-disclosure and openness, (iii) new friendships, and (iv) networks in the local community. Three of the subthemes mainly describe benefits, while challenges were more implicit and cut across the subthemes. Identified challenges were related to transitions from Anonymity Online to revealing one’s identity offline, confidentiality, and barriers related to participation in offline peer support groups.
    This study suggests that Online and offline peer support groups complement each other, and that combining them is mainly described as beneficial by service users. Identified benefits appeared to arise from service users’ options of one format or the other, or that they could combine formats in ways that suited their individual values and comfort zones. Moderation by a trained service user consultant appeared essential for both formats and can be used systematically to address identified challenges. Combining Online and offline peer support groups is a promising concept for facilitating recovery-oriented care and warrants continued research.
    © The Author(s) 2020.

Hannes Federrath – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Privacy and Identity Management – Anonymity Online – Current Solutions and Challenges
    IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Matthias Marx, Erik Sy, Christian Burkert, Hannes Federrath

    Abstract:

    Internet communication, regardless whether it is encrypted or not, comes with an abundance of protocol metadata. Web browsers reveal plenty of information to web applications. Additionally, web service operators have a great interest in their users’ preferences and behaviour, leading to the development and deployment of several sophisticated tracking mechanisms. Therefore, the protection of the user’s privacy on the Internet becomes increasingly difficult. Helpful privacy enhancing tools and techniques, which are often free of charge, are available to everyone, although have not reached widespread adoption yet. In this paper, we discuss different techniques of tracking as a challenge to Online Anonymity. Furthermore, we present current solutions on the application level as well as on the network level to provide Anonymity, and finally we point out avenues for future research in the field of Online Anonymity. We find security-hardened operating systems promising to protect personal data against relatively strong adversaries on the user side. On the network side we consider lightweight network-based techniques like IPv6 pseudonymisation as promising technologies for future practical and usable Anonymity on the Internet.

  • Anonymity Online current solutions and challenges
    IFIP International Summer School on Privacy and Identity Management, 2017
    Co-Authors: Matthias Marx, Erik Sy, Christian Burkert, Hannes Federrath

    Abstract:

    Internet communication, regardless whether it is encrypted or not, comes with an abundance of protocol metadata. Web browsers reveal plenty of information to web applications. Additionally, web service operators have a great interest in their users’ preferences and behaviour, leading to the development and deployment of several sophisticated tracking mechanisms. Therefore, the protection of the user’s privacy on the Internet becomes increasingly difficult. Helpful privacy enhancing tools and techniques, which are often free of charge, are available to everyone, although have not reached widespread adoption yet. In this paper, we discuss different techniques of tracking as a challenge to Online Anonymity. Furthermore, we present current solutions on the application level as well as on the network level to provide Anonymity, and finally we point out avenues for future research in the field of Online Anonymity. We find security-hardened operating systems promising to protect personal data against relatively strong adversaries on the user side. On the network side we consider lightweight network-based techniques like IPv6 pseudonymisation as promising technologies for future practical and usable Anonymity on the Internet.

  • iNetSeC – Anonymity Online for Everyone: What Is Missing for Zero-Effort Privacy on the Internet?
    Open Problems in Network Security, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dominik Herrmann, Jens Lindemann, Ephraim Zimmer, Hannes Federrath

    Abstract:

    Privacy is difficult to protect on the Internet, because surveillance is ubiquitous. Researchers have conceived many different countermeasures. However, these solutions have so far failed to find widespread adoption due to poor performance and usability. What is missing is an Internet access that offers a decent level of privacy for average users out of the box. In this paper, we survey suitable lightweight Anonymity solutions and present avenues for future research so that Internet service providers can offer Anonymity Online without compromising performance and usability, i.e. an effortless solution for customers.

Monica Strand – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Combining Online and offline peer support groups in community mental health care settings: a qualitative study of service users’ experiences
    International Journal of Mental Health Systems, 2020
    Co-Authors: Monica Strand, Deede Gammon

    Abstract:

    Background Peer support for people with long-term mental health problems is central to recovery-oriented approaches in mental health care. Peer support has traditionally been conducted offline in face-to-face groups, while Online groups on the Internet have increased rapidly. Offline and Online peer support groups are shown to have differing strengths and weaknesses. However, little is known about how combining the two formats might be experienced by service users, which this paper aims to illuminate. Methods In this exploratory and descriptive study, a recovery-oriented Internet-based portal called ReConnect was used by service users in two mental health communities in Norway for 6–12 months. The portal included an Online peer support group which also facilitated participation in local offline peer support groups. Both group formats were moderated by an employed service user consultant. Qualitative data about service users’ experiences were collected through focus groups and individual interviews and inductively analyzed thematically. Results A total of 14 female service users 22–67 years of age with various diagnoses participated in three focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Two main themes were identified: (1) balancing Anonymity and openness, and (2) enabling connectedness. These themes are further illustrated with the subthemes: (i) dilemmas of Anonymity and confidentiality, (ii) towards self-disclosure and openness, (iii) new friendships, and (iv) networks in the local community. Three of the subthemes mainly describe benefits, while challenges were more implicit and cut across the subthemes. Identified challenges were related to transitions from Anonymity Online to revealing one’s identity offline, confidentiality, and barriers related to participation in offline peer support groups. Conclusions This study suggests that Online and offline peer support groups complement each other, and that combining them is mainly described as beneficial by service users. Identified benefits appeared to arise from service users’ options of one format or the other, or that they could combine formats in ways that suited their individual values and comfort zones. Moderation by a trained service user consultant appeared essential for both formats and can be used systematically to address identified challenges. Combining Online and offline peer support groups is a promising concept for facilitating recovery-oriented care and warrants continued research.

  • Combining Online and offline peer support groups in community mental health care settings: a qualitative study of service users’ experiences.
    International journal of mental health systems, 2020
    Co-Authors: Monica Strand, Deede Gammon

    Abstract:

    Peer support for people with long-term mental health problems is central to recovery-oriented approaches in mental health care. Peer support has traditionally been conducted offline in face-to-face groups, while Online groups on the Internet have increased rapidly. Offline and Online peer support groups are shown to have differing strengths and weaknesses. However, little is known about how combining the two formats might be experienced by service users, which this paper aims to illuminate.
    In this exploratory and descriptive study, a recovery-oriented Internet-based portal called ReConnect was used by service users in two mental health communities in Norway for 6-12 months. The portal included an Online peer support group which also facilitated participation in local offline peer support groups. Both group formats were moderated by an employed service user consultant. Qualitative data about service users’ experiences were collected through focus groups and individual interviews and inductively analyzed thematically.
    A total of 14 female service users 22-67 years of age with various diagnoses participated in three focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Two main themes were identified: (1) balancing Anonymity and openness, and (2) enabling connectedness. These themes are further illustrated with the subthemes: (i) dilemmas of Anonymity and confidentiality, (ii) towards self-disclosure and openness, (iii) new friendships, and (iv) networks in the local community. Three of the subthemes mainly describe benefits, while challenges were more implicit and cut across the subthemes. Identified challenges were related to transitions from Anonymity Online to revealing one’s identity offline, confidentiality, and barriers related to participation in offline peer support groups.
    This study suggests that Online and offline peer support groups complement each other, and that combining them is mainly described as beneficial by service users. Identified benefits appeared to arise from service users’ options of one format or the other, or that they could combine formats in ways that suited their individual values and comfort zones. Moderation by a trained service user consultant appeared essential for both formats and can be used systematically to address identified challenges. Combining Online and offline peer support groups is a promising concept for facilitating recovery-oriented care and warrants continued research.
    © The Author(s) 2020.