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Anterior Interosseous Nerve

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Dale A Classen – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Anterior Interosseous Nerve syndrome presenting with pronator teres weakness a case report
    Muscle & Nerve, 1997
    Co-Authors: Nigel L Ashworth, Shawn C Marshall, Dale A Classen

    Abstract:

    Anterior Interosseous Nerve syndrome (AINS) has been well described. A key muscle to examine clinically and on electromyography is the pronator teres, as this can differentiate between forearm and more proximal entrapment sites. We present a case of AINS with marked weakness and denervation of pronator teres. At operation the Anterior Interosseous Nerve gave rise to the Nerve to pronator teres and was entrapped by a fibrous band from the deep head of pronator teres. © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Muscle Nerve20: 1591–1594, 1997

Francisco Martinez – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • transfer of brachioradialis motor branch to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve in c8 t1 brachial plexus palsy an anatomic study
    Microsurgery, 2013
    Co-Authors: M Antonio D Garcialopez, Eduardo Fernandez, Francisco Martinez

    Abstract:

    We present an anatomical and histomorphometric study of the transfer of the motor branch to the brachioradialis muscle to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve in recent brachial plexus lesions, involving C8 and T1 roots. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the anatomic constancy of the Nerves involved in the transfer, feasibility, and reproducibility of the transfer. We performed a study of 14 elbows in fresh cadavers. Transfer of the motor branch of the brachioradialis muscle to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve was possible in all specimens; there was constancy in the origin and entry into the muscle of the donor Nerve, and it was always possible to dissect the recipient Nerve at the level of the donor Nerve, thereby allowing for direct coaptation of the Nerves. The mean diameter of the Anterior Interosseous Nerve was 2.9 ± 0.5 mm and the mean diameter of the brachioradialis muscle branch was 2 ± 0.4 mm. The branch to the brachioradialis muscle contains an average of 550 ± 64 myelinated axons and the Anterior Interosseous Nerve has an average of 2266 ± 274 myelinated axons. The anatomic study in cadavers showed that the technique is justified and anatomically reproducible. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery, 2013.

  • Transfer of brachioradialis motor branch to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve in C8‐T1 brachial plexus palsy. An anatomic study
    Microsurgery, 2012
    Co-Authors: Antonio García-lópez, Eduardo Fernandez, Francisco Martinez

    Abstract:

    We present an anatomical and histomorphometric study of the transfer of the motor branch to the brachioradialis muscle to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve in recent brachial plexus lesions, involving C8 and T1 roots. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the anatomic constancy of the Nerves involved in the transfer, feasibility, and reproducibility of the transfer. We performed a study of 14 elbows in fresh cadavers. Transfer of the motor branch of the brachioradialis muscle to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve was possible in all specimens; there was constancy in the origin and entry into the muscle of the donor Nerve, and it was always possible to dissect the recipient Nerve at the level of the donor Nerve, thereby allowing for direct coaptation of the Nerves. The mean diameter of the Anterior Interosseous Nerve was 2.9 ± 0.5 mm and the mean diameter of the brachioradialis muscle branch was 2 ± 0.4 mm. The branch to the brachioradialis muscle contains an average of 550 ± 64 myelinated axons and the Anterior Interosseous Nerve has an average of 2266 ± 274 myelinated axons. The anatomic study in cadavers showed that the technique is justified and anatomically reproducible. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery, 2013.

Yudong Gu – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • pronator teres branch transfer to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve for treating c8t1 brachial plexus avulsion an anatomic study and case report
    Neurosurgery, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jianyun Yang, Cong Yu, Yudong Gu

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of C8T1 avulsion is challenging for neurosurgeons. Various methods for the restoration of finger flexion are used. However, most of these methods have different disadvantages and cannot restore the full active range of motion of the fingers. OBJECTIVE: To determine the feasibility of the pronator teres branch transfer to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve with anatomic study and to use this method in 1 case. METHODS: The upper limbs of 15 fresh cadavers were dissected to identify the main trunk of the median Nerve, the pronator teres branch, and the Anterior Interosseous Nerve. The mean number and length of the pronator teres branches were recorded. The Anterior Interosseous Nerve was dissected atraumatically to the most proximal level where the fibers of the Anterior Interosseous Nerve did not mingle with the fibers of the main trunk of the median, which was defined as the atraumatic level of the Anterior Interosseous Nerve. A line joining the most protruding point of the medial condyle and lateral condyle of the humerus was used as a measurement landmark. Pronator teres branch transfer to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve was performed in 1 patient with C8T1 avulsion. RESULTS: The mean number of the pronator teres branches was 2.37 ± 0.49. The mean length of the pronator teres branches was 9.64 ± 0.71 mm. The mean distance between the point where the pronator teres branches originated and the landmark line was 3.87 ± 0.34 mm. The mean distance between the atraumatic level of the Anterior Interosseous Nerve and the landmark line was -5.46 ± 0.73 mm. Transfer of the pronator teres was used to innervate the Anterior Interosseous Nerve in 1 patient with C8T1 avulsion. When assessed 14 months after the operation, a full active range of motion of the fingers had been restored, and the patient’s finger flexor muscles had regained grade 4 power. CONCLUSION: The pronator teres can be transferred to the Anterior Interosseous Nerve directly at the elbow level. This operation was performed successfully in 1 patient, who exhibited finger flexion recovery.