Anterior Pelvic Tilt - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Anterior Pelvic Tilt

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1113 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Wongyu Yoo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of unilateral exercises on low back pain in an urban driver.
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Wongyu Yoo

    Abstract:

    [Purpose] This study aimed to develop unilateral exercises for urban drivers and investigate the effect of these exercises on low back pain (LBP). [Subject and Methods] A 40-year-old male driver, who complained of LBP on the left side at L3-5 levels, participated in this study. A two-session program was conducted, and LBP, Pelvic Tilt angle, and trunk range of motion were measured after each session. [Results] After the unilateral exercises, the Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle was improved and the visual analog scale score of back pain decreased. [Conclusion] Analyzing car features and performing individual approaches are necessary in providing treatment for urban drivers with LBP.

  • Effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Wongyu Yoo

    Abstract:

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise on sacroiliac joint pain with knee pain. [Subjects and Methods] A 39-year-old female had severe pain in the right medial buttock and right Anterior knee. This study assessed the Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle and pain provocation tests before and after single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise for 4 weeks. [Results] Following the course of exercise, the Anterior Pelvic Tilt angles were increased, and the visual analog scale pain scores for both the right buttock and right knee were 2/10. [Conclusion] Single-leg, lateral oblique, decline squat exercise may be effective for treating SI joint pain with knee pain in females.

  • Effects of Inclined Treadmill Walking on Pelvic Anterior Tilt Angle, Hamstring Muscle Length, and Trunk Muscle Endurance of Seated Workers with Flat-back Syndrome.
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science, 2014
    Co-Authors: Min-hee Kim, Wongyu Yoo

    Abstract:

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of inclined treadmill walking on Pelvic Anterior Tilt angle, hamstring muscle length, and back muscle endurance of seated workers with flat-back syndrome. [Subjects] Eight seated workers with flat-back syndrome who complained of low-back pain in the L3–5 region participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects performed a walking exercise on a 30° inclined treadmill. We measured the Pelvic Anterior Tilt angle, hamstring muscle length, and back muscle endurance before and after inclined treadmill walking. [Results] Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle and active knee extension angle significantly increased after inclined treadmill walking. Trunk extensor and flexor muscle endurance times were also significantly increased compared to the baseline. [Conclusion] Inclined treadmill walking may be an effective approach for the prevention or treatment of low-back pain in flat-back syndrome.

Ratnavalli Ellajosyula – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Relationship between Pelvic Alignment and Weight-bearing Asymmetry in Community-dwelling Chronic Stroke Survivors.
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: Suruliraj Karthikbabu, Mahabala Chakrapani, Sailakshmi Ganesan, Ratnavalli Ellajosyula

    Abstract:

    Background and Purpose: Altered Pelvic alignment and asymmetrical weight bearing on lower extremities are the most common findings observed in standing and walking after stroke. The purpose of this study was to find the relationship between Pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care rehabilitation centers. In standing, the lateral and Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle of chronic stroke survivors was assessed using palpation (PALM™) meter device. The percentage of WBA was measured with two standard weighing scales. Pearson correlation coefficient ( r ) was used to study the correlation between Pelvic Tilt and WBA. Results: Of 112 study participants, the mean (standard deviation) age was 54.7 (11.7) years and the poststroke duration was 14 (11) months. The lateral Pelvic Tilt on the most affected side and bilateral Anterior Pelvic Tilt were 2.47 (1.8) and 4.4 (1.8) degree, respectively. The percentage of WBA was 23.2 (18.94). There was a high correlation of lateral Pelvic Tilt with WBA ( r = 0.631; P r = 0.44; P Conclusion: Excessive lateral Pelvic Tilt toward the most affected side in standing may influence the weight-bearing ability of the ipsilateral lower extremity in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors.

  • Relationship between Pelvic Alignment and Weight-bearing Asymmetry in Community-dwelling Chronic Stroke Survivors.
    Journal of neurosciences in rural practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: Suruliraj Karthikbabu, Mahabala Chakrapani, Sailakshmi Ganesan, Ratnavalli Ellajosyula

    Abstract:

    Altered Pelvic alignment and asymmetrical weight bearing on lower extremities are the most common findings observed in standing and walking after stroke. The purpose of this study was to find the relationship between Pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors.
    This cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care rehabilitation centers. In standing, the lateral and Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle of chronic stroke survivors was assessed using palpation (PALM™) meter device. The percentage of WBA was measured with two standard weighing scales. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to study the correlation between Pelvic Tilt and WBA.
    Of 112 study participants, the mean (standard deviation) age was 54.7 (11.7) years and the poststroke duration was 14 (11) months. The lateral Pelvic Tilt on the most affected side and bilateral Anterior Pelvic Tilt were 2.47 (1.8) and 4.4 (1.8) degree, respectively. The percentage of WBA was 23.2 (18.94). There was a high correlation of lateral Pelvic Tilt with WBA (r = 0.631; P < 0.001) than Anterior Pelvic Tilt (r = 0.44; P < 0.001).
    Excessive lateral Pelvic Tilt toward the most affected side in standing may influence the weight-bearing ability of the ipsilateral lower extremity in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors.

  • Relationship between Pelvic Alignment and Weight-bearing Asymmetry in Community-dwelling Chronic Stroke Survivors
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice, 2016
    Co-Authors: Suruliraj Karthikbabu, Mahabala Chakrapani, Sailakshmi Ganesan, Ratnavalli Ellajosyula

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT
    Background and Purpose: Altered Pelvic alignment and asymmetrical weight bearing on lower extremities are the most common findings observed in standing and walking after stroke. The purpose of this study was to find the relationship between Pelvic alignment and weight-bearing asymmetry (WBA) in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in tertiary care rehabilitation centers. In standing, the lateral and Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle of chronic stroke survivors was assessed using palpation (PALM™) meter device. The percentage of WBA was measured with two standard weighing scales. Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to study the correlation between Pelvic Tilt and WBA. Results: Of 112 study participants, the mean (standard deviation) age was 54.7 (11.7) years and the poststroke duration was 14 (11) months. The lateral Pelvic Tilt on the most affected side and bilateral Anterior Pelvic Tilt were 2.47 (1.8) and 4.4 (1.8) degree, respectively. The percentage of WBA was 23.2 (18.94). There was a high correlation of lateral Pelvic Tilt with WBA (r = 0.631; P < 0.001) than Anterior Pelvic Tilt (r = 0.44; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Excessive lateral Pelvic Tilt toward the most affected side in standing may influence the weight-bearing ability of the ipsilateral lower extremity in community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors.

Junghoon Lee – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching and Kinesiology Taping on Pelvic Compensation During Double-Knee Extension.
    Journal of Human Kinetics, 2015
    Co-Authors: Seung-woong Lee, Junghoon Lee

    Abstract:

    Shortened hamstrings are likely to restrict the Anterior Pelvic Tilt and induce a slumped posture due to the posterior Pelvic Tilt. This study was conducted to compare the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching and modified Anterior Pelvic Tilt taping (APTT) on hamstring shortness-associated Pelvic compensation while executing seated double-knee extension. Male college students (28 healthy young adults; mean age: 21.4 ± 2.1 years) with hamstring shortness were recruited as study subjects and randomly assigned to either the PNF stretching group (control group) or the APTT group (experimental group). In all the subjects, changes in the movement distance of the centre of gluteal pressure (COGP) as well as rectus abdominis (RA) and semitendinosus (SEM) muscle activities were measured during seated double-knee extension while the respective intervention method was applied. Both groups showed significant decreases in COGP distance and RA muscle activity compared with their respective baseline values (p < 0.05), however, no significant changes were observed in SEM muscle activity. We can infer that not only a direct intervention on the hamstring, such as PNF stretching, but also a modified APTT-mediated Pelvic intervention may be used as a method for reducing Pelvic compensation induced by hamstring shortness.

  • Effect of posterior Pelvic Tilt taping in women with sacroiliac joint pain during active straight leg raising who habitually wore high-heeled shoes: a preliminary study.
    Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2014
    Co-Authors: Junghoon Lee, Wongyu Yoo, Mi-hyun Kim, Kyung Soon Lee, Jin-tae Han

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to assess whether a 1-day application of posterior Pelvic Tilt taping (PPTT) using a kinesiology tape would decrease Anterior Pelvic Tilt and active straight leg raising test scores in women with sacroiliac joint who habitually wore high-heeled shoes. Methods Sixteen women (mean age, 23.63 ± 3.18 years) were enrolled in this study. Anterior Pelvic Tilt was measured using a palpation meter before PPTT application, immediately after PPTT application, 1 day after PPTT application, and immediately after PPTT removal after 1 day of application. Active straight leg raising scores were measured at the same periods. Posterior Pelvic Tilt taping was applied in the target position (posterior Pelvic Tilt position). Results The Anterior Pelvic Tilt was decreased during and after 1 day of PPTT application (before and after kinesiology tape removal) compared with the initial angle (all P P Conclusion The results of this preliminary study suggests that PPTT may temporarily decrease Anterior Pelvic Tilt and active straight leg raising score in women with sacroiliac joint pain who habitually wear high-heeled shoes.

  • Application of posterior Pelvic Tilt taping for the treatment of chronic low back pain with sacroiliac joint dysfunction and increased sacral horizontal angle
    Physical Therapy in Sport, 2011
    Co-Authors: Junghoon Lee, Wongyu Yoo

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Kinesio Taping (KT) is a therapeutic method used by physical therapists and athletic trainers in combination with other treatment techniques for various musculoskeletal and neuromuscular problems. However, no research has evaluated the effect of KT in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this case was to describe the application of posterior Pelvic Tilt taping (PPTT) with Kinesio tape as a treatment for chronic LBP and to reduce the Anterior Pelvic Tilt angle. Design Case report. Case description The patien was a 20-year-old female amateur swimmer with a Cobb’s angle (L1–S1) of 68°, a sacral horizontal angle of 45°, and pain in both medial buttock areas and sacroiliac joints. We performed PPTT with Kinesio tape for 2 weeks (six times per week for an average of 9h each time). Results The patient’s radiographs showed that the Cobb’s angle (L1–S1) had decreased from 68° to 47° and that the sacral horizontal angle had decreased from 45° to 31°. Reductions in hypomobility or motion asymmetry, as assessed by the motion palpation test, and in pain, as measured by the pain-provocation tests, were observed. On palpation for both medial buttock areas in the prone position, the patient felt no pain. The patient experienced no pain or stiffness in the low back area while performing forward flexion in the standing position with knees fully extended when washing dishes in the sink. Conclusions The case study demonstrated that PPTT intervention favourably affected the Pelvic inclination and sacral horizontal angle, leading to beneficial effects on sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) and medial buttock pain. Additional research on the clinical effects of this taping procedure requires greater numbers of athletes with SIJD or LBP who have inappropriate Anterior Pelvic Tilt angles and hyperlordosis.