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Anti-Gliadin Antibodies

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Francisco J. Arregui – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers
    23rd International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors, 2014
    Co-Authors: Abian B. Socorro, Jesus M. Corres, Ignacio R. Matias, I. Del Villar, Francisco J. Arregui

    Abstract:

    This work presents the development and test of an Anti-Gliadin Antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm Anti-Gliadin Antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  • Spectral width reduction in lossy mode resonance-based sensors by means of tapered optical fibre structures
    Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 2014
    Co-Authors: Abian B. Socorro, Jesus M. Corres, Francisco J. Arregui, I. Del Villar, Ignacio R. Matias

    Abstract:

    Abstract This contribution pursues the goal of achieving an optical fibre-based platform to detect Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs), in order to early diagnose celiac disease. To this purpose, the generation of lossy mode resonances (LMRs) in several evanescent field optical structures was studied both theoretically and experimentally. LMRs were obtained by adsorbing a polymeric thin-film onto the optical structures using the layer-by-layer assembly technique. The LMR shape depends on the geometry of the optical structure and its attenuation was controlled just by tuning the length of the device. The best performance was obtained with tapered single-mode optical fibres, which provided more than a 50% reduction in the spectral width of the LMR by using a shorter device. This improvement was successfully applied to detect Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs) in 5 ppm concentration, what can be used to diagnose celiac disease, and shows the potential of this technology to address biosensing applications.

  • Tapered optical fiber biosensor for the detection of Anti-Gliadin Antibodies
    Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jesus M. Corres, Ignacio R. Matias, J. Bravo, Francisco J. Arregui

    Abstract:

    Abstract A new biosensor has been developed by coating a tapered optical fiber with an Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs) sensitive nanofilm using the electrostatic self-assembled (ESA) monolayer technique in order to aid the diagnosis of celiac disease. Optical fibers were tapered and then the specific antigen was deposited using the ESA method which allows the construction of nanometric scale recognition surfaces on the fiber optic and helps to create fast response sensors for real time observation of the binding process. Power changes up to 6 dB have been recorded during the Antibodies binding process with concentrations in the range 1–15 ppm. Optimal deposition parameters have been selected using an in situ interferometric characterization technique which allows to state the working point of the sensor accurately. The high sensitivity and continuous monitoring of the proposed scheme can reduce importantly the time and serum volume required for celiac disease tests.

Torsten Matthias – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Diagnostic challenges in celiac disease and the role of the tissue transglutaminase-neo-epitope.
    Clinical reviews in allergy & immunology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Torsten Matthias, Sascha Pfeiffer, Carlo Selmi, M Eric Gershwin

    Abstract:

    The diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) remains a clinical challenge based on the incomplete specificity and sensitivity rates of current non-invasive tests. Furthermore, histological assessments fail to identify all overt cases and, in particular, do not manifest pathognomonic alterations in silent cases. Accordingly, the majority of CD cases are diagnosed with great delay. Recent research into the pathogenesis of CD, allowed us to identify a neo-antigen that appears to be the most promising serological tool for the detection of anti-tissue transglutaminase as well as Anti-Gliadin Antibodies.

  • Diagnostic Challenges in Celiac Disease and the Role of the Tissue Transglutaminase–Neo-Epitope
    Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Torsten Matthias, Sascha Pfeiffer, Carlo Selmi, M. Eric Gershwin

    Abstract:

    The diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) remains a clinical challenge based on the incomplete specificity and sensitivity rates of current non-invasive tests. Furthermore, histological assessments fail to identify all overt cases and, in particular, do not manifest pathognomonic alterations in silent cases. Accordingly, the majority of CD cases are diagnosed with great delay. Recent research into the pathogenesis of CD, allowed us to identify a neo-antigen that appears to be the most promising serological tool for the detection of anti-tissue transglutaminase as well as Anti-Gliadin Antibodies.

Jesus M. Corres – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Celiac disease biodetection using lossy-mode resonances generated in tapered single-mode optical fibers
    23rd International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors, 2014
    Co-Authors: Abian B. Socorro, Jesus M. Corres, Ignacio R. Matias, I. Del Villar, Francisco J. Arregui

    Abstract:

    This work presents the development and test of an Anti-Gliadin Antibodies biosensor based on lossy mode resonances (LMRs) to detect celiac disease. Several polyelectrolites were used to perform layer-by-layer assembly processes in order to generate the LMR and to fabricate a gliadin-embedded thin-film. The LMR shifted 20 nm when immersed in a 5 ppm Anti-Gliadin Antibodies-PBS solution, what makes this bioprobe suitable for detecting celiac disease. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that LMRs are used to detect celiac disease and these results suppose promising prospects on the use of such phenomena as biological detectors.

  • Spectral width reduction in lossy mode resonance-based sensors by means of tapered optical fibre structures
    Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 2014
    Co-Authors: Abian B. Socorro, Jesus M. Corres, Francisco J. Arregui, I. Del Villar, Ignacio R. Matias

    Abstract:

    Abstract This contribution pursues the goal of achieving an optical fibre-based platform to detect Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs), in order to early diagnose celiac disease. To this purpose, the generation of lossy mode resonances (LMRs) in several evanescent field optical structures was studied both theoretically and experimentally. LMRs were obtained by adsorbing a polymeric thin-film onto the optical structures using the layer-by-layer assembly technique. The LMR shape depends on the geometry of the optical structure and its attenuation was controlled just by tuning the length of the device. The best performance was obtained with tapered single-mode optical fibres, which provided more than a 50% reduction in the spectral width of the LMR by using a shorter device. This improvement was successfully applied to detect Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs) in 5 ppm concentration, what can be used to diagnose celiac disease, and shows the potential of this technology to address biosensing applications.

  • Tapered optical fiber biosensor for the detection of Anti-Gliadin Antibodies
    Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 2008
    Co-Authors: Jesus M. Corres, Ignacio R. Matias, J. Bravo, Francisco J. Arregui

    Abstract:

    Abstract A new biosensor has been developed by coating a tapered optical fiber with an Anti-Gliadin Antibodies (AGAs) sensitive nanofilm using the electrostatic self-assembled (ESA) monolayer technique in order to aid the diagnosis of celiac disease. Optical fibers were tapered and then the specific antigen was deposited using the ESA method which allows the construction of nanometric scale recognition surfaces on the fiber optic and helps to create fast response sensors for real time observation of the binding process. Power changes up to 6 dB have been recorded during the Antibodies binding process with concentrations in the range 1–15 ppm. Optimal deposition parameters have been selected using an in situ interferometric characterization technique which allows to state the working point of the sensor accurately. The high sensitivity and continuous monitoring of the proposed scheme can reduce importantly the time and serum volume required for celiac disease tests.