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Anti-Infective Therapy

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M. S. Elisaf – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lysis syndrome during Therapy of visceral leishmaniasis
    Infection, 2012
    Co-Authors: E. N. Liberopoulos, A. A. Kei, M. S. Elisaf

    Abstract:

    Introduction Lysis syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders usually seen after the initiation of chemoTherapy for rapidly proliferating malignancies (tumor lysis syndrome). Reported herein is a tumor lysis-like syndrome after the initiation of Anti-Infective Therapy for visceral leishmaniasis. Patients and methods Ten consecutive patients with visceral leishmaniasis were administered liposomal amphotericin B. Levels of serum uric acid, phosphate, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, calcium, and magnesium were evaluated prior to as well as 4 and 30 days following the initiation of treatment. Results During the 4th post-treatment day significant increases in the levels of serum uric acid, phosphate, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were seen, while the levels of calcium, potassium, and magnesium were not significantly altered. Patients were treated by hydration, urine alkalization, and administration of allopurinol as needed. A recovery of metabolic abnormalities was recorded 1 month later, although some patients had evidence of residual injury. Conclusion A lysis syndrome may complicate the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. Awareness of this complication can lead to the initiation of prophylactic treatment as well as to early recognition and management of this syndrome in susceptible patients.

  • Lysis syndrome during Therapy of visceral leishmaniasis.
    Infection, 2011
    Co-Authors: E. N. Liberopoulos, A. A. Kei, M. S. Elisaf

    Abstract:

    Introduction
    Lysis syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders usually seen after the initiation of chemoTherapy for rapidly proliferating malignancies (tumor lysis syndrome). Reported herein is a tumor lysis-like syndrome after the initiation of Anti-Infective Therapy for visceral leishmaniasis.

James A Hoch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a two component signal transduction system essential for growth of bacillus subtilis implications for anti infective Therapy
    Journal of Bacteriology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Celine Fabret, James A Hoch

    Abstract:

    A two-component signal transduction system encoded by the yycF and yycG genes is part of an operon containing three genes, yycH, yycI, and yycJ, with no known function and a gene, yycK, coding for an HtrA-like protease. This operon was transcribed during growth, and its transcription shut down as the cells approached stationary phase. This decreased transcription was not Spo0A dependent. The HtrA protease gene was separately controlled during sporulation from a ςG promoter. Studies using insertional inactivation plasmids revealed that neither yycF nor yycG could be inactivated, whereas the other genes were inactivated without loss of viability. A temperature-sensitive YycF response regulator mutant was isolated and shown to have an H215P mutation in a putative DNA-binding domain which is closely related to the OmpR family of response regulators. At the nonpermissive temperature, cultures of the mutant strain stopped growth within 30 min, and this was followed by a decrease in optical density. Microscopically, many of the cells appeared to retain their structure while being empty of their contents. The essential processes regulated by this two-component system remain unknown. A search of the genome databases revealed YycF, YycG, and YycJ homologues encoded by three linked genes in Streptococcus pyogenes. The high level of identity of these proteins (71% for YycF) suggests that this system may play a similar role in gram-positive pathogens.

  • two component signal transduction as a target for microbial anti infective Therapy
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 1998
    Co-Authors: John F Barrett, James A Hoch

    Abstract:

    Bacteria are continually bombarded by a multitude of chemicals from their environment, some of which may serve as potential sources of carbon, nitrogen, and energy, while others may act as poisons of their metabolic and regulatory processes. This mix of environmental signals and insults is highly variable and most certainly locale dependent. The potential for an organism to grow and divide within any locale or ecological niche is determined genetically by its repertoire of genes and by its capacity to induce new gene expression to cope with new environments. Often a bacterial infection results from an organism moving from an environment where its presence is benign (e.g., the gastrointestinal system) to another environment where it poses a serious problem (e.g., the urinary tract). This movement between ecological niches requires that the organism “sense” its presence in the new environment and “respond” by expressing new genetic information to permit it to occupy and grow within it. Success in this endeavor is the result of the sum of incremental genetic responses to the new environment of the host.

E. N. Liberopoulos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lysis syndrome during Therapy of visceral leishmaniasis
    Infection, 2012
    Co-Authors: E. N. Liberopoulos, A. A. Kei, M. S. Elisaf

    Abstract:

    Introduction Lysis syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders usually seen after the initiation of chemoTherapy for rapidly proliferating malignancies (tumor lysis syndrome). Reported herein is a tumor lysis-like syndrome after the initiation of Anti-Infective Therapy for visceral leishmaniasis. Patients and methods Ten consecutive patients with visceral leishmaniasis were administered liposomal amphotericin B. Levels of serum uric acid, phosphate, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, calcium, and magnesium were evaluated prior to as well as 4 and 30 days following the initiation of treatment. Results During the 4th post-treatment day significant increases in the levels of serum uric acid, phosphate, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were seen, while the levels of calcium, potassium, and magnesium were not significantly altered. Patients were treated by hydration, urine alkalization, and administration of allopurinol as needed. A recovery of metabolic abnormalities was recorded 1 month later, although some patients had evidence of residual injury. Conclusion A lysis syndrome may complicate the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. Awareness of this complication can lead to the initiation of prophylactic treatment as well as to early recognition and management of this syndrome in susceptible patients.

  • Lysis syndrome during Therapy of visceral leishmaniasis.
    Infection, 2011
    Co-Authors: E. N. Liberopoulos, A. A. Kei, M. S. Elisaf

    Abstract:

    Introduction
    Lysis syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders usually seen after the initiation of chemoTherapy for rapidly proliferating malignancies (tumor lysis syndrome). Reported herein is a tumor lysis-like syndrome after the initiation of Anti-Infective Therapy for visceral leishmaniasis.