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Anti-Phase Domain

The Experts below are selected from a list of 183 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Pichet Limsuwan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE
    Journal of Semiconductors, 2020
    Co-Authors: P. Jantawongrit, S. Sanorpim, Hiroyuki Yaguchi, M. Orihara, Pichet Limsuwan

    Abstract:

    InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ~ 5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and Anti-Phase Domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors g = 11$\overline{2}$0 and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of Anti-Phase Domains.

  • Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE
    Journal of Semiconductors, 2015
    Co-Authors: P. Jantawongrit, S. Sanorpim, Hiroyuki Yaguchi, M. Orihara, Pichet Limsuwan

    Abstract:

    © 2015 Chinese Institute of Electronics. InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ∼5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and Anti-Phase Domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of Anti-Phase Domains.

P. Jantawongrit – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE
    Journal of Semiconductors, 2020
    Co-Authors: P. Jantawongrit, S. Sanorpim, Hiroyuki Yaguchi, M. Orihara, Pichet Limsuwan

    Abstract:

    InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ~ 5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and Anti-Phase Domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors g = 11$\overline{2}$0 and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of Anti-Phase Domains.

  • Microstructures of InN film on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate grown by RF-MBE
    Journal of Semiconductors, 2015
    Co-Authors: P. Jantawongrit, S. Sanorpim, Hiroyuki Yaguchi, M. Orihara, Pichet Limsuwan

    Abstract:

    © 2015 Chinese Institute of Electronics. InN film was grown on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate by RF plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). Prior to the growth of InN film, an InN buffer layer with a thickness of ∼5.5 nm was grown on the substrate. Surface morphology, microstructure and structural quality of InN film were investigated. Micro-structural defects, such as stacking faults and Anti-Phase Domain in InN film were carefully investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that a high density of line contrasts, parallel to the growth direction (c-axis), was clearly observed in the grown InN film. Dark field TEM images recorded with diffraction vectors and g = 0002 revealed that such line contrasts evolved from a coalescence of the adjacent misoriented islands during the initial stage of the InN nucleation on the substrate surface. This InN nucleation also led to a generation of Anti-Phase Domains.

E.a. Fitzgerald – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Anti-Phase Domain-free growth of GaAs on offcut (001) Ge wafers by molecular beam epitaxy with suppressed Ge outdiffusion
    Journal of Electronic Materials, 1998
    Co-Authors: R.m. Sieg, S.a. Ringel, E.a. Fitzgerald, S.m. Ting, R. N. Sacks

    Abstract:

    The nucleation and growth of GaAs films on offcut (001) Ge wafers by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated, with the objective of establishing nucleation conditions which reproducibly yield GaAs films which are free of antiphase Domains (APDs) and which have suppressed Ge outdiffusion into the GaAs layer. The nucleation process is monitored by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Several nucleation variables are studied, including the state of the initial Ge surface (single-Domain 2×1 or mixed-Domain 2×1:1×2), the initial prelayer (As, Ga, or mixed), and the initial GaAs growth temperature (350 or 500°C). Conditions are identified which simultaneously produce APD-free GaAs layers several microns in thickness on Ge wafers with undetectable Ge outdiffusion and with surface roughness equivalent to that of GaAs/GaAs homoepitaxy. APD-free material is obtained using either As or Ga nucleation layers, with the GaAs Domain dependent upon the initial exposure chemical species. Key growth steps for APD-free GaAs/Ge growth by solid source MBE include an epitaxial Ge buffer deposited in the MBE chamber to bury carbon contamination from the underlying Ge wafer, an anneal of the Ge buffer at 640°C to generate a predominantly double atomic-height stepped surface, and nucleation of GaAs growth by a ten monolayer migration enhanced epitaxy step initiated with either pure As or Ga. We identify this last step as being responsible for blocking Ge outdiffusion to below 10^15 cm^−3 within 0.5 microns of the GaAs/Ge interface.

  • Anti-Phase Domain-free GaAs on Ge substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy for space solar cell applications
    Conference Record of the Twenty Sixth IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference – 1997, 1997
    Co-Authors: S.a. Ringel, R.m. Sieg, S.m. Ting, E.a. Fitzgerald

    Abstract:

    Elimination of Anti-Phase Domains (APDs), threading dislocations and uncontrolled interface diffusion are critical considerations for achieving maximum design flexibility and high efficiency in multi-bandgap III-V solar cells on Ge. In this paper, we identify critical growth steps to eliminate each of these problems and present an optimum molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth procedure which yields APD-free, near-dislocation-free GaAs/Ge with greatly suppressed interdiffusion in both the GaAs overlayer and Ge substrate. For solid source MBE, elimination of APDs requires a double-stepped, clean Ge surface and a prelayer consisting of a complete monolayer of either As or Ga. Correct conditions can be observed and maintained by real-time in-situ monitoring to ensure reproducibility. Initiating growth at low temperature with migration enhanced epitaxy virtually eliminates Ge diffusion into GaAs and Ga diffusion into Ge, while As diffusion into Ge is substantially suppressed.