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Portable Antiquities Of The Netherlands Datacurator – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • PAN-00016978 – coin/coin-related, (ondetermineerbaar), antoninianus
    DANS KNAW, 2020
    Co-Authors: Portable Antiquities Of The Netherlands Datacurator

    Abstract:

    This find is registered at Portable Antiquities of the Netherlands with number PAN-0001697

  • PAN-00072651 – composite shoe buckle
    DANS KNAW, 2020
    Co-Authors: Portable Antiquities Of The Netherlands Datacurator

    Abstract:

    This find is registered at Portable Antiquities of the Netherlands with number PAN-0007265

  • PAN-00046530 – fan-shaped strap clamp with convex shape (book mount)
    DANS KNAW, 2020
    Co-Authors: Portable Antiquities Of The Netherlands Datacurator

    Abstract:

    This find is registered at Portable Antiquities of the Netherlands with number PAN-0004653

Neil Brodie – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The Antiquities Market: It’s All in a Price
    Heritage & Society, 2014
    Co-Authors: Neil Brodie

    Abstract:

    Antiquities have cultural and economic value. Scholarly experts create cultural value, and by creating cultural value they also unintentionally establish economic value. So although Antiquities are collected as culturally-important objects, they have also been bought for investment purposes as tangible assets, though with mixed results. Collectors and investors must face the problem of how to assess accurately the cultural and economic value of an antiquity, though again the intervention of scholarly experts is crucial. Scholars themselves benefit financially from even indirect involvement with the Antiquities market, and their work can be appropriated and exploited financially as intellectual property. Antiquities trading is often illicit, and in such conditions profits made from the Antiquities market are proceeds of crime, though that fact is generally overlooked.

  • 13 The Internet Market in Pre-Columbian Antiquities
    Cultural Property Crime, 2014
    Co-Authors: Neil Brodie

    Abstract:

    This chapter discusses the opportunity to establish the volume, value, and structure of the Internet market in Antiquities by collecting different types of sales information. It was known that pre-Columbian Antiquities could be bought at physical auction from eBay USA, from other Internet auction sites, and from Internet dealers. The sheer volume of material offered for sale required the implementation of sampling strategy and the calculation of average statistics to describe the volume, value, and nature of annual sales. eBay was visited several times in 2012 and 2013 and sales information was tabulated for total period of thirty-three days. For people who are not Antiquities merchants it is hard to say anything that is constructive or productive about present state of Internet market in pre-Columbian Antiquities. Thus the Internet market is flourishing in part because of what appears to be widespread indifference on the part of customers to issues involved. Keywords: annual sales; eBay; Internet market; pre-Columbian Antiquities; sales information

  • Auction houses and the Antiquities trade
    , 2014
    Co-Authors: Neil Brodie

    Abstract:

    From their prestigious premises in London and New York the large auction houses Sotheby’s and Christie’s and to a lesser extent Bonhams dominate the Antiquities market. Straddling the wholesale-retail divide, selling to collectors and dealers alike, their auctions are highlights of the annual Antiquities sales calendar. Not surprisingly, given their central place in the market, they frequently become embroiled in disputes over the possession of stolen and illegally-exported (illicit) Antiquities. One reason for this seeming vulnerability to third-party fencing operations is their dismissive attitude towards published provenance, considered here to comprise the published ownership history of a piece. In auction catalogues provenance is often not supplied or offered only in barest anonymized outline – “property of a European gentleman” or “bought on the London market” have become cliche s. Even when more informative and reliable information is made available, it is usually limited to one or two public events in the otherwise private life of the object – the date and place of a previous sale, for example, or the object’s mention in a scholarly publication. Only on rare occasions is a full provenance detailing an unbroken chain of ownership provided. With nothing that might help to reveal their true nature, there is nothing to hinder the entry onto the market of stolen, illegally-traded or counterfeit Antiquities. For this reason alone, auction houses facilitate illegal trade by providing an environment that is conducive to the marketing of illicit material. But their involvement is sometimes thought to go beyond simple facilitation, and extend to more active support. This paper describes cases of auction houses having been caught selling stolen or otherwise illegally-traded material, and examines what they reveal about the policies and practices of auction houses as regards the illicit trade in Antiquities, and what evidence there is of the more intimate involvement of auction houses.

Donna Yates – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • What Is Grey about the “Grey Market” in Antiquities?
    Oxford Scholarship Online, 2017
    Co-Authors: Simon Mackenzie, Donna Yates

    Abstract:

    The global market in Antiquities has been described as a grey market. We provide a breakdown of the meanings and implications of this greyness. Usually the term refers to the mixing of recently looted Antiquities with those that can be sold legally, thus the Antiquities market is grey because illicit objects are sold via a public and purportedly legitimate network of dealers and auction houses. This is supported by a second form of greyness: the ethically grey status of individual looted objects after time and their passage through jurisdictions via multiple trades obscures or overwrites their illicit origins. It is also supported by a greying of ethical judgment, achieved through a discourse that permits the purchase of illicit objects in constructed circumstances of “saving” or “preserving” artifacts.

  • What is Grey About the ‘Grey Market’ in Antiquities
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Donna Yates

    Abstract:

    The global market in Antiquities has been described as a ‘grey market’ in discussions by various commentators of the problem of illicit cultural property. In this contribution, we set out to interrogate that terminology, ultimately providing (we hope) a definitive breakdown of the meanings and implications of the idea of ‘greyness’ as it applies to this particular illicit market. As we shall see, the term ‘grey market’ has been rather liberally applied by researchers working on illicit markets in cultural objects, and is in danger of becoming a generic but unrefined synonym for the interface between certain illicit practices in excavation and the public Antiquities trade. It would seem helpful therefore at this point in the development of the research evidence base on illicit Antiquities – and particularly in the context of the theme and other contributions in this book – to pause and reflect on what we mean when we observe greyness in this market.

  • collectors on illicit collecting higher loyalties and other techniques of neutralization in the unlawful collecting of rare and precious orchids and Antiquities
    Theoretical Criminology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Simon Mackenzie, Donna Yates

    Abstract:

    Trafficking natural objects and trafficking cultural objects have been treated separately both in regulatory policy and in criminological discussion. The former is generally taken to be ‘wildlife crime’ while the latter has come to be considered under the auspices of a debate on ‘illicit art and Antiquities’. In this article we study the narrative discourse of high-end collectors of orchids and Antiquities. The illicit parts of these global trades are subject to this analytical divide between wildlife trafficking and art trafficking, and this has resulted in quite different regulatory structures for each of these markets. However, the trafficking routines, the types and levels of harm involved, and the supply–demand dynamics in the trafficking of orchids and Antiquities are actually quite similar, and in this study we find those structural similarities reflected in substantial common ground in the way collectors talk about their role in each market. Collectors of rare and precious orchids and Antiquities