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Antisemitism

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Emma Poulton – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • tackling Antisemitism within english football a critical analysis of policies and campaigns using a multiple streams approach
    International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Emma Poulton

    Abstract:

    While the anti-racist movement in English football has been established for 25 years, Antisemitism was not specifically addressed until much later – most publicly through anti-discrimination organi…

  • towards understanding Antisemitism and the contested uses and meanings of yid in english football
    Ethnic and Racial Studies, 2016
    Co-Authors: Emma Poulton

    Abstract:

    This article addresses an omission in the currently brief body of work on Antisemitism in football and contributes to and advances wider sociological debates in the sub-disciplines of race and ethnicity, religion, linguistics and sport. The article examines antisemitic discourse in English football and in doing so, explains the different uses and meanings of ‘Yid’ in the vernacular culture of fans. While many conceive of ‘Yid’ as an ethnic epithet, fans of Tottenham Hotspur – Gentiles and Jews – have appropriated and embraced the term, using it to deflect the antisemitic abuse they are targeted with due to their ‘Jewish identity’. The study maps the contested uses of ‘Yid’ on a continuum to explain and demarcate between the nuanced forms of Antisemitism in football. It makes central the cultural context in which ‘Yid’ is used, together with the intent underpinning its use, since epithets and slurs are not simply determined by their lexical form.

Cristiana Facchini – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • L’ostilita’ antiebraica nel mondo cattolico: un percorso storiografico e politico
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Cristiana Facchini

    Abstract:

    This article aims to describe the relationship between Jews and Catholics against the backdrop of the rise of the national state and the process of political emancipation in the long nineteenth century. In doing so, it attempts to place the overlooked Italian context in the background of both national and transnational history, focusing on themes that would become relevant and reiterated until the rise of Fascism and Nazism. It argues that modern Antisemitism was embedded in a web of discourses and representations that were deeply ingrained in Christian cultures, even when a secularizing society emerged. Catholic Antisemitism, therefore, both exploited and rearranged old theological tropes with a new modern language capable to adjust to economic and political changes

  • L'ostilita' antiebraica nel mondo cattolico: un percorso storiografico e politico
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Cristiana Facchini

    Abstract:

    This article aims to describe the relationship between Jews and Catholics against the backdrop of the rise of the national state and the process of political emancipation in the long nineteenth century. In doing so, it attempts to place the overlooked Italian context in the background of both national and transnational history, focusing on themes that would become relevant and reiterated until the rise of Fascism and Nazism. It argues that modern Antisemitism was embedded in a web of discourses and representations that were deeply ingrained in Christian cultures, even when a secularizing society emerged. Catholic Antisemitism, therefore, both exploited and rearranged old theological tropes with a new modern language capable to adjust to economic and political changes

Lars Rensmann – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the politics of unreason the frankfurt school and the origins of modern Antisemitism
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: Lars Rensmann

    Abstract:

    Although the Frankfurt School—most prominently associated with Theodor W. Adorno, Max Horkheimer, Leo Lowenthal and Herbert Marcuse—represents one of the most influential intellectual traditions of the 20th century, its multi-faceted work on modern Antisemitism has so far largely been neglected. The Politics of Unreason fills this gap. The book provides the first systematic study of the Frankfurt School’s social, psychological and political research and theorizing on the problem of Antisemitism. Situating Critical Theorists’ work in its rich philosophical and sociological contexts, the book closely examines their various contributions on the subject—from major ground-breaking studies and prominent essays to seemingly marginal pieces and aphorisms. The study thoroughly reconstructs how the Frankfurt School, faced with the catastrophe of the genocide against the European Jews, explains modern forms and causes of Antisemitism and the politics of hate. Critical Theory’s analysis, however, is not limited to Nazism’s genocidal judeophobia. Consequently, the book also pays special attention to the Frankfurt School’s research on coded and “secondary” Antisemitism after the Holocaust, and how resentments are politically mobilized under conditions of democracy. By revisiting and rereading the Frankfurt School’s original work, The Politics of Unreason challenges several common misperceptions about Critical Theory’s philosophy and social research. In so doing, the book changes both our understanding of the Frankfurt School, and it changes our understanding of Antisemitism through the Frankfurt School. It is argued that Critical Theory provides an important resource to better understand the origins, scope and politics of modern Antisemitism, racism, and hate speech in the modern world—and in our time.

  • guilt resentment and post holocaust democracy the frankfurt school s analysis of secondary Antisemitism in the group experiment and beyond
    Antisemitism Studies, 2017
    Co-Authors: Lars Rensmann

    Abstract:

    Previous discussions of the Frankfurt School’s work on Judeophobia have almost entirely neglected the Critical Theorists’ pathbreaking analysis of “secondary Antisemitism” after Auschwitz. This new form of Jew-hatred originates in the political and psychological desire to split off, repress, and downplay the memory of the Holocaust because such memory, with which Jews are often identified, evokes unwelcome guilt feelings. As Holocaust memory undermines the uncritical identification with a collective, family, or nation tainted by anti-Jewish mass atrocities, the repression of national guilt may unconsciously motivate the reproduction of resentments that helped cause the Shoah. In this light, the article re-examines the empirical postwar German study Group Experiment and other works of the Frankfurt School. Three specific defensive mechanisms in relation to historical collective guilt feelings are identified that engender a variety of antisemitic projections—from “Jewish power” to “Jewish money” and other anti-Jewish tropes—after the Holocaust. It is argued that these insights into post-Holocaust secondary Antisemitism, empirically analyzed in the German context, can partly be transferred to other contexts in European democracies and beyond. This article demonstrates that an unprocessed history of national guilt can have a negative impact on democracy and the resilience of Antisemitism.