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Aortic Endothelial Cell

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Eugene A Sprague – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Human Aortic Endothelial Cell response to 316L stainless steel material microstructure
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Animesh Choubey, Denes Marton, Eugene A Sprague

    Abstract:

    The role of metal microstructure (e.g. grain sizes) in modulating Cell adherence behavior is not well understood. This study investigates the effect of varying grain sizes of 316L stainless steel (SS) on the attachment and spreading of human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAECs). Four different grain size samples; from 16 to 66 μm (ASTM 9.0-4.9) were sectioned from sheets. Grain structure was revealed by polishing and etching with glycergia. Contact angle measurement was done to assess the hydrophilicity of the specimens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the roughness and surface chemistry of the specimens. Cells were seeded on mechanically polished and chemically etched specimens followed by identification of activated focal adhesion sites using fluorescently tagged anti-pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase). The 16 μm grain size etched specimens had significantly ( P  

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  • Human Aortic Endothelial Cell response to 316L stainless steel material microstructure
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Animesh Choubey, Denes Marton, Eugene A Sprague

    Abstract:

    The role of metal microstructure (e.g. grain sizes) in modulating Cell adherence behavior is not well understood. This study investigates the effect of varying grain sizes of 316L stainless steel (SS) on the attachment and spreading of human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAECs). Four different grain size samples; from 16 to 66 μm (ASTM 9.0-4.9) were sectioned from sheets. Grain structure was revealed by polishing and etching with glycergia. Contact angle measurement was done to assess the hydrophilicity of the specimens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the roughness and surface chemistry of the specimens. Cells were seeded on mechanically polished and chemically etched specimens followed by identification of activated focal adhesion sites using fluorescently tagged anti-pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase). The 16 μm grain size etched specimens had significantly (P < 0.01) higher number of Cells attached per cm2 than other specimens, which may be attributed to the greater grain boundary area and associated higher surface free energy. This study shows that the underlying material microstructure may influence the HAEC behavior and may have important implications in Endothelialization.

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  • human Aortic Endothelial Cell migration onto stent surfaces under static and flow conditions
    Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Eugene A Sprague, Jian Luo, Julio C Palmaz

    Abstract:

    Purpose The objective of the present study is to establish an in vitro model designed to quantitatively define human Aortic Endothelial Cell (HAEC) migration onto stainless steel stent material under both static and flow conditions of high and low wall shear stress. Materials and Methods To simulate implantation of a stent onto the intact arterial wall, HAECs were seeded and grown to confluence on thick, firm collagen gels. Flat 1 × 1-cm square, stainless steel pieces were implanted on this Endothelialized surface and migration of HAECs onto the steel surface was monitored, measured, and compared under static and high (15 dynes/cm 2 ) and low (2 dynes/cm 2 ) wall shear stress flow conditions designed to model wall shear stress levels encountered at different sites within the human arterial system. Results Under no flow, Endothelial Cell migration occurred uniformly from the periphery, attaining complete confluence over the square surface within 14 days. The initial migratory rate was approximately 10 (μm/h ± 0.5 on days 1–3 and increased to a rate near 15 μm/h ± 0.5 between days 10 and 14. High shear stress significantly ( P Conclusions These results indicate the rate and extent of Endothelial migration onto a prosthetic material surface are influenced by the level and direction of flow-related wall shear stress. Furthermore, these results demonstrate an in vitro model that provides a method to quantitatively evaluate and possibly predict the relative ability of different prosthetic materials to Endothelialize under variable in vivo flow conditions.

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Naoki Mochizuki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • selective inhibition of vascular Endothelial growth factor receptor 2 vegfr 2 identifies a central role for vegfr 2 in human Aortic Endothelial Cell responses to vegf
    Journal of Receptors and Signal Transduction, 2003
    Co-Authors: Akira Endo, Shigetomo Fukuhara, Michitaka Masuda, Toyonori Ohmori, Naoki Mochizuki

    Abstract:

    AbstractVascular Endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) are considered essential for angiogenesis. The VEGFR‐family proteins consist of VEGFR‐1/Flt‐1, VEGFR‐2/KDR/Flk‐1, and VEGFR‐3/Flt‐4. Among these, VEGFR‐2 is thought to be principally responsible for angiogenesis. However, the precise role of VEGFRs1–3 in Endothelial Cell biology and angiogenesis remains unclear due in part to the lack of VEGFR‐specific inhibitors. We used the newly described, highly selective anilinoquinazoline inhibitor of VEGFR‐2 tyrosine kinase, ZM323881 (5‐[[7‐(benzyloxy) quinazolin‐4‐yl]amino]‐4‐fluoro‐2‐methylphenol), to explore the role of VEGFR‐2 in Endothelial Cell function. Consistent with its reported effects on VEGFR‐2 [IC(50) < 2 nM], ZM323881 inhibited activation of VEGFR‐2, but not of VEGFR‐1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet‐derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor. We studied the effects of VEGF on human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAECs), which express VE…

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Animesh Choubey – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Human Aortic Endothelial Cell response to 316L stainless steel material microstructure
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Animesh Choubey, Denes Marton, Eugene A Sprague

    Abstract:

    The role of metal microstructure (e.g. grain sizes) in modulating Cell adherence behavior is not well understood. This study investigates the effect of varying grain sizes of 316L stainless steel (SS) on the attachment and spreading of human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAECs). Four different grain size samples; from 16 to 66 μm (ASTM 9.0-4.9) were sectioned from sheets. Grain structure was revealed by polishing and etching with glycergia. Contact angle measurement was done to assess the hydrophilicity of the specimens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the roughness and surface chemistry of the specimens. Cells were seeded on mechanically polished and chemically etched specimens followed by identification of activated focal adhesion sites using fluorescently tagged anti-pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase). The 16 μm grain size etched specimens had significantly ( P  

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  • Human Aortic Endothelial Cell response to 316L stainless steel material microstructure
    Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2009
    Co-Authors: Animesh Choubey, Denes Marton, Eugene A Sprague

    Abstract:

    The role of metal microstructure (e.g. grain sizes) in modulating Cell adherence behavior is not well understood. This study investigates the effect of varying grain sizes of 316L stainless steel (SS) on the attachment and spreading of human Aortic Endothelial Cells (HAECs). Four different grain size samples; from 16 to 66 μm (ASTM 9.0-4.9) were sectioned from sheets. Grain structure was revealed by polishing and etching with glycergia. Contact angle measurement was done to assess the hydrophilicity of the specimens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the roughness and surface chemistry of the specimens. Cells were seeded on mechanically polished and chemically etched specimens followed by identification of activated focal adhesion sites using fluorescently tagged anti-pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase). The 16 μm grain size etched specimens had significantly (P < 0.01) higher number of Cells attached per cm2 than other specimens, which may be attributed to the greater grain boundary area and associated higher surface free energy. This study shows that the underlying material microstructure may influence the HAEC behavior and may have important implications in Endothelialization.

    Free Register to Access Article