Apis dorsata - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Apis dorsata

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1299 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Benjamin P Oldroyd – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • genetic structure of a giant honey bee Apis dorsata population in northern thailand implications for conservation
    Insect Conservation and Diversity, 2013
    Co-Authors: Atsalek Rattanawannee, Chanpen Chanchao, Siriwat Wongsiri, Benjamin P Oldroyd

    Abstract:

    .  1. The giant honey bee, Apis dorsata, is a keystone pollinator. The species is heavily hunted throughout Thailand. Furthermore, forest clearing, widespread use of pesticides and proliferation of street lighting (which attracts bees, often resulting in their death) are likely to have significant impacts on population viability.

    2. We examined the relatedness and genetic variation within and between aggregations of A. dorsata nests. Microsatellite analysis of 54 nests in three aggregations showed that no colonies were related as mother–daughter. Thus, if reproduction occurred at our study sites, daughter colonies dispersed. This suggests that rapid increases in A. dorsata colony numbers during general flowering events most likely occur by swarms arriving from other areas rather than by in situ reproduction.

    3. The population has high levels of heterozygosity. Fst values between aggregations were not significantly different from zero (P > 0.05). This suggests that despite the formidable anthropogenic pressures that the A. dorsata population endures in northern Thailand, the species continues to enjoy a large effective population size and has high connectedness.

    4. We conclude that A. dorsata is currently able to tolerate habitat fragmentation and annual harvesting. We speculate that the population is sustained by immigration from forested regions to the northwest of our study sites in Burma.

  • No evidence that habitat disturbance affects mating frequency in the giant honey bee Apis dorsata
    Apidologie, 2012
    Co-Authors: Atsalek Rattanawannee, Chanpen Chanchao, Siriwat Wongsiri, Benjamin P Oldroyd

    Abstract:

    The giant honey bee (Apis dorsata) is a keystone pollinator within Asian lowland forests. Across its range, A. dorsata populations are impacted by heavy hunting pressure and habitat disturbance. These pressures have the potential to significantly impact the genetic structure of populations, particularly the ability of queens to find a large number of genetically diverse drones for mating. Here, we compare queen mating frequency and allelic diversity between colonies sampled in disturbed and undisturbed areas in Thailand. Microsatellite analysis of 18 colonies in 6 aggregations showed no significant difference in paternity frequency at disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Measures of FST and genetic differentiation between aggregations were not significantly different from zero (P > 0.05); measures of allelic diversity showed no differences between disturbed and undisturbed sites, and there was no evidence of population structuring based on the program STRUCTURE. Our findings suggest, surprisingly, that habitat disturbance has no effect on the mating frequency, genetic diversity, or population connectedness. This suggests that the mating behavior of A. dorsata is robust to anthropogenic changes to the landscape.

  • genetic structure of an Apis dorsata population the significance of migration and colony aggregation
    Journal of Heredity, 2004
    Co-Authors: Jurgen Paar, Benjamin P Oldroyd, E Huettinger, Gerald Kastberger

    Abstract:

    Eight microsatellite loci were used to investigate the genetic structure of the giant honeybee (Apis dorsata) population in northeast India. This species migrates seasonally between summer and winter nesting sites, and queens appear to return to their previously occupied site. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency for colonies of this species to aggregate at perennially utilized nesting sites that may be shared by more than 150 colonies. These behavioral features suggest that colonies within aggregations should be more related than random colonies, but that the long-distance migration could act to minimize genetic differentiation both between geographical areas and within aggregations. Our genetic study supports these conjectures arising from natural history. A. dorsata aggregations are comprised of colonies that share more alleles than expected by chance. Although queens heading neighboring colonies are not close relatives, fixation indices show significant genetic differentiation among aggregation sites. However, there appears to be sufficient gene flow among aggregations to prevent high degrees of relatedness developing between colonies within aggregations. The results also suggest that there is significant population structuring between geographical regions, although the level of structuring caused by aggregation

Siriwat Wongsiri – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • genetic structure of a giant honey bee Apis dorsata population in northern thailand implications for conservation
    Insect Conservation and Diversity, 2013
    Co-Authors: Atsalek Rattanawannee, Chanpen Chanchao, Siriwat Wongsiri, Benjamin P Oldroyd

    Abstract:

    .  1. The giant honey bee, Apis dorsata, is a keystone pollinator. The species is heavily hunted throughout Thailand. Furthermore, forest clearing, widespread use of pesticides and proliferation of street lighting (which attracts bees, often resulting in their death) are likely to have significant impacts on population viability.

    2. We examined the relatedness and genetic variation within and between aggregations of A. dorsata nests. Microsatellite analysis of 54 nests in three aggregations showed that no colonies were related as mother–daughter. Thus, if reproduction occurred at our study sites, daughter colonies dispersed. This suggests that rapid increases in A. dorsata colony numbers during general flowering events most likely occur by swarms arriving from other areas rather than by in situ reproduction.

    3. The population has high levels of heterozygosity. Fst values between aggregations were not significantly different from zero (P > 0.05). This suggests that despite the formidable anthropogenic pressures that the A. dorsata population endures in northern Thailand, the species continues to enjoy a large effective population size and has high connectedness.

    4. We conclude that A. dorsata is currently able to tolerate habitat fragmentation and annual harvesting. We speculate that the population is sustained by immigration from forested regions to the northwest of our study sites in Burma.

  • geometric morphometric analysis of giant honeybee Apis dorsata fabricius 1793 populations in thailand
    Journal of Asia-pacific Entomology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Atsalek Rattanawannee, Chanpen Chanchao, Siriwat Wongsiri

    Abstract:

    Abstract Geometric morphometry was used to characterize 73 Apis dorsata colonies collected from 31 different localities in five major geographic regions of mainland Thailand. We measured 19 easily identified landmarks from the digitized images of the right forewing of 10 worker bees from each colony (730 bees in total); thus, avoiding the confounding variation from haploid or diploid males. After plotting the factor scores, A. dorsata from (mainland) Thailand were found to belong to a single group, which was further supported by a hierarchical cluster analysis-generated dendrogram. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA, α = 0.05) demonstrated no significant differences among the five geographic groups of A. dorsata in Thailand, producing a low degree of accuracy (31.2%) in the identification of the geographic region from which any individual bee originated. Additionally, when the bee samples were classified into two groups, those north and south of the Isthmus of Kra were not significantly different (MANOVA, α = 0.05), and a low rate of correct classification in a cross-validation test (65% correct) was found. Therefore, this geometric morphometric based analysis of worker bee wing venation pattern suggests that A. dorsata populations in mainland Thailand are panmictic.

  • No evidence that habitat disturbance affects mating frequency in the giant honey bee Apis dorsata
    Apidologie, 2012
    Co-Authors: Atsalek Rattanawannee, Chanpen Chanchao, Siriwat Wongsiri, Benjamin P Oldroyd

    Abstract:

    The giant honey bee (Apis dorsata) is a keystone pollinator within Asian lowland forests. Across its range, A. dorsata populations are impacted by heavy hunting pressure and habitat disturbance. These pressures have the potential to significantly impact the genetic structure of populations, particularly the ability of queens to find a large number of genetically diverse drones for mating. Here, we compare queen mating frequency and allelic diversity between colonies sampled in disturbed and undisturbed areas in Thailand. Microsatellite analysis of 18 colonies in 6 aggregations showed no significant difference in paternity frequency at disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Measures of FST and genetic differentiation between aggregations were not significantly different from zero (P > 0.05); measures of allelic diversity showed no differences between disturbed and undisturbed sites, and there was no evidence of population structuring based on the program STRUCTURE. Our findings suggest, surprisingly, that habitat disturbance has no effect on the mating frequency, genetic diversity, or population connectedness. This suggests that the mating behavior of A. dorsata is robust to anthropogenic changes to the landscape.

Jerzy Woyke – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • for what purpose do worker bees of Apis dorsata colonies construct and use wax specks
    Journal of Apicultural Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Jerzy Woyke

    Abstract:

    The free living giant bee Apis dorsata migrates seasonally, but the biology of migrating swarms is unknown. A recent publication suggests, that arriving giant honey bees use wax specks from a previ…

  • shape indexes of nests of Apis dorsata and Apis laboriosa
    Journal of Apicultural Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jerzy Woyke, Jerzy Wilde, Maria Wilde

    Abstract:

    The giant honey bees Apis dorsata and Apis laboriosa construct nests of different shapes and sizes. A method was required to compare the shapes and sizes of these nests. We developed a nest shape index (NSI). It presents the ratio of the dimension of the upper horizontal attachment of the nest base (B), to the vertical dimension of the nest (V); NSI = B/V. We examined the NSI of A. dorsata nests. The results varied; NSI = 0.6–4.7. The shape of nests under a sloped support is characterized by the inclination index (II). This index presents the ratio of the vertical dimension of the nest (V) to the dimension perpendicular to the sloped base (P). The inclination index of the nests observed by us, varied; II = 1.2–3.0. The mean shape of A. laboriosa was NSI = 0.96. The difference between the NSI of A. dorsata and A. laboriosa is due to environmental conditions. These indexes make it possible to compare the shapes of different sized nests when real nests were measured or from measurement of nests in photograph…

  • workers often predominate in dusk drone flights of the giant honey bee Apis dorsata
    Journal of Apicultural Research, 2005
    Co-Authors: Jerzy Woyke, Jerzy Wilde, Maria Wilde, Chandrashekar C Reddy, Cleofas R Cervancia

    Abstract:

    Mating flights of queen and drone honey bees are performed at a particular, species-specific time of day. Mating flights of Apis dorsata drones take place in mass flights at dusk (Koeniger & Wijayagunasekara, 1976; Koeniger et al., 1988; Rinderer et al., 1993; Koeniger et al., 1994; Woyke et al., 2001). Queens of A. dorsata fly at the same time (Tan et al., 1999). Although only drones and queens have been reported as taking part in these mass flights at dusk, we have observed workers flying together with drones (unpublished observation). The research we report here documents flight activity of worker A. dorsata during dusk mass flights (DMFs).