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Apnea Index

The Experts below are selected from a list of 318 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Joseph Cummiskey – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • progressive improvement of Apnea Index and ventilatory response to co2 after tracheostomy in obstructive sleep Apnea syndrome1 3
    The American review of respiratory disease, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christian Guilleminault, Joseph Cummiskey

    Abstract:

    In order to determine whether reversible alterations in ventilatory control are found in obstructive sleep Apnea syndromes, 5 male patients 31 to 57 yr of age presenting with the syndrome were polygraphically monitored before and several times during the 6 months after tracheostomy. They also had a hypercapnic ventilatory response study before surgery and again 3 months after surgery during the daytime. A dramatic decrease in overall Apnea Index was seen immediately after surgery, but the number of central Apneas and the central Apnea Index did not reach low values until several months after tracheostomy. Ventilatory response to CO2 improved in all cases after surgery.

  • Progressive Improvement of Apnea Index and Ventilatory Response to CO2 after Tracheostomy in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome1–3
    The American review of respiratory disease, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christian Guilleminault, Joseph Cummiskey

    Abstract:

    In order to determine whether reversible alterations in ventilatory control are found in obstructive sleep Apnea syndromes, 5 male patients 31 to 57 yr of age presenting with the syndrome were polygraphically monitored before and several times during the 6 months after tracheostomy. They also had a hypercapnic ventilatory response study before surgery and again 3 months after surgery during the daytime. A dramatic decrease in overall Apnea Index was seen immediately after surgery, but the number of central Apneas and the central Apnea Index did not reach low values until several months after tracheostomy. Ventilatory response to CO2 improved in all cases after surgery.

W C Weng – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Central sleep Apnea in obese children with sleep-disordered breathing
    International Journal of Obesity, 2014
    Co-Authors: C H Chou, K T Kang, W C Weng

    Abstract:

    Objectives: In contrast to obstructive sleep Apnea (OSA), central sleep Apnea (CSA) in obese children has received lesser attention. As pediatric CSA is more prevalent than expected and adversely impacts health, this study aims to elucidate the major factors associated with central Apnea Index (CAI) and compare CSA between obese and non-obese children. Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed in a tertiary referral medical center. Children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) ranging from 2–18 years old were enrolled. All participants completed history taking, otolaryngological examination and overnight polysomnography. CSA was defined as having CAI exceeding 1 h^−1. CAI and the prevalence of CSA were analyzed in children of different age groups, weight statuses and adenotonsillar sizes. Results: A total of 487 cases were included. The prevalence of CSA was 13.3% (65/487). CAI was negatively correlated with age ( r =−0.32, P

Christian Guilleminault – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • progressive improvement of Apnea Index and ventilatory response to co2 after tracheostomy in obstructive sleep Apnea syndrome1 3
    The American review of respiratory disease, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christian Guilleminault, Joseph Cummiskey

    Abstract:

    In order to determine whether reversible alterations in ventilatory control are found in obstructive sleep Apnea syndromes, 5 male patients 31 to 57 yr of age presenting with the syndrome were polygraphically monitored before and several times during the 6 months after tracheostomy. They also had a hypercapnic ventilatory response study before surgery and again 3 months after surgery during the daytime. A dramatic decrease in overall Apnea Index was seen immediately after surgery, but the number of central Apneas and the central Apnea Index did not reach low values until several months after tracheostomy. Ventilatory response to CO2 improved in all cases after surgery.

  • Progressive Improvement of Apnea Index and Ventilatory Response to CO2 after Tracheostomy in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome1–3
    The American review of respiratory disease, 2015
    Co-Authors: Christian Guilleminault, Joseph Cummiskey

    Abstract:

    In order to determine whether reversible alterations in ventilatory control are found in obstructive sleep Apnea syndromes, 5 male patients 31 to 57 yr of age presenting with the syndrome were polygraphically monitored before and several times during the 6 months after tracheostomy. They also had a hypercapnic ventilatory response study before surgery and again 3 months after surgery during the daytime. A dramatic decrease in overall Apnea Index was seen immediately after surgery, but the number of central Apneas and the central Apnea Index did not reach low values until several months after tracheostomy. Ventilatory response to CO2 improved in all cases after surgery.

  • P361 Neurocognitive testing in children with and without OSA
    Sleep Medicine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Yu-shu Huang, Ning-hung Chen, Christian Guilleminault

    Abstract:

    needed supraglottoplasty since they progressed with pectus excavatum, and with weight and height deficit. When comparing the three groups in relation to the polysomnographic findings, the group with laryngomalacia was similar to the group of control infants and different from the infant Apnea group regarding central Apnea Index (p = 0.001) and obstructive Apnea Index (p = 0.008). The laryngomalacia group was similar to the group with infant Apnea and different from control subjects concerning desaturation and bradycardia events (p = 0.012) and SaO2 nadir (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that polysomnography was not relevant as a tool to evaluate infants with laryngomalacia. Based on our findings it was not possible to speculate that central nervous system immaturity is a factor involved in the ethiopathogeny of laryngomalacia.