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Apolipoprotein C3

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Robert J. Konrad – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Relationship of Apolipoprotein A5 and Apolipoprotein C3 levels to serum triglycerides in patients with type 2 diabetes.
    Clinica Chimica Acta, 2006
    Co-Authors: William E. Alborn, Melvin J. Prince, Robert J. Konrad

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background The role of Apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5) in modulating triglyceride levels in humans is incompletely understood. Some researchers have reported modest positive correlations of ApoA5 with triglycerides while others have reported negative correlations. A recent report suggested that ApoA5 gene expression may be influenced by insulin. In type 2 diabetes, some groups have reported higher levels of ApoA5 compared to normals while others have reported lower levels. Methods To better understand the relationships between ApoA5, Apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3), and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes, ApoA5 levels were measured and correlated with triglyceride, insulin, and HbA1c levels. ApoC3 levels were measured and correlated with triglycerides. Results In patients with type 2 diabetes, ApoA5 levels were elevated compared to normals, with several patients having markedly increased levels confirmed by Western blotting. ApoA5 levels were positively correlated with triglycerides ( r  = 0.60) but were not correlated with either HbA1c or serum insulin levels. ApoC3 levels were highly positively correlated with triglycerides ( r  = 0.88). Conclusions These data indicate that in patients with type 2 diabetes ApoA5 levels are positively correlated with triglycerides but are not correlated with HbA1c or insulin levels. ApoC3 levels are strongly positively correlated with triglycerides in these patients.

  • Relationship of Apolipoprotein A5 and Apolipoprotein C3 levels to serum triglycerides in patients with type 2 diabetes.
    Clinica chimica acta; international journal of clinical chemistry, 2006
    Co-Authors: William E. Alborn, Melvin J. Prince, Robert J. Konrad

    Abstract:

    The role of Apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5) in modulating triglyceride levels in humans is incompletely understood. Some researchers have reported modest positive correlations of ApoA5 with triglycerides while others have reported negative correlations. A recent report suggested that ApoA5 gene expression may be influenced by insulin. In type 2 diabetes, some groups have reported higher levels of ApoA5 compared to normals while others have reported lower levels.
    To better understand the relationships between ApoA5, Apolipoprotein C3 (ApoC3), and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes, ApoA5 levels were measured and correlated with triglyceride, insulin, and HbA1c levels. ApoC3 levels were measured and correlated with triglycerides.
    In patients with type 2 diabetes, ApoA5 levels were elevated compared to normals, with several patients having markedly increased levels confirmed by Western blotting. ApoA5 levels were positively correlated with triglycerides (r=0.60) but were not correlated with either HbA1c or serum insulin levels. ApoC3 levels were highly positively correlated with triglycerides (r=0.88).
    These data indicate that in patients with type 2 diabetes ApoA5 levels are positively correlated with triglycerides but are not correlated with HbA1c or insulin levels. ApoC3 levels are strongly positively correlated with triglycerides in these patients.

Karin E. Bornfeldt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Association of Apolipoprotein C3 with insulin resistance and coronary artery calcium in patients with type 1 diabetes
    Journal of clinical lipidology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Teresa Buckner, Baohai Shao, Robert H. Eckel, Jay W. Heinecke, Karin E. Bornfeldt, Janet K. Snell-bergeon

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3) is a risk factor for incident coronary artery disease in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The pathways that link elevated APOC3 levels to an increased risk of incident CVD in people with T1D are not understood. Objective To explore potential mechanisms, we investigated the association of APOC3 with insulin resistance and coronary artery calcium (CAC). Methods In a random sub-cohort of subjects with T1D from Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) (n=134), serum APOC3, HDL-associated APOC3, and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4; a potential marker of insulin resistance) were measured by targeted mass spectrometry. We used linear regression to evaluate associations of serum APOC3 and HDL-APOC3 with APOB, non-HDL cholesterol, serum- and HDL-associated RBP4, estimated insulin sensitivity (eIS), and logistic regression to evaluate association with presence of CAC, adjusted for age, sex, and diabetes duration. Results Serum APOC3 correlated positively with APOB and non-HDL cholesterol and was associated with increased odds of CAC (OR: 1.68, p=0.024). eIS was not associated with serum- or HDL-RBP4 but was negatively associated with serum APOC3 in males (s estimate: -0.318, p=0.0040) and decreased odds of CAC (OR: 0.434, p=0.0023). Conclusions Serum APOC3 associates with increased insulin resistance and CAC in T1D.

  • Emerging Targets for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Diabetes.
    Trends in molecular medicine, 2020
    Co-Authors: Nathan O. Stitziel, Jenny E. Kanter, Karin E. Bornfeldt

    Abstract:

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM) increase the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), resulting in acute cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke. Recent clinical trials point toward new treatment and prevention strategies for cardiovascular complications of T2DM. New antidiabetic agents show unexpected cardioprotective benefits. Moreover, genetic and reverse translational strategies have revealed potential novel targets for CVD prevention in diabetes, including inhibition of Apolipoprotein C3 (APOC3). Modeling and pharmacology-based approaches to improve insulin action provide additional potential strategies to combat CVD. The development of new strategies for improved diabetes and lipid control fuels hope for future prevention of CVD associated with diabetes.

P. Lecomte – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Triglycerides, apo C3 and Lp B:C3 and cardiovascular risk in Type II diabetes
    Diabetologia, 2000
    Co-Authors: N. Gervaise, M. A. Garrigue, G. Lasfargues, P. Lecomte

    Abstract:

    Aims/hypothesis. Cardiovascular complications and particularly coronary heart disease are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Some studies have shown that hypertriglyceridaemia in diabetes is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. In the ECTIM study high Apolipoprotein C3 and lipoprotein B:C3 concentrations (lipoparticles playing a role in triglyceride metabolism) were associated with myocardial infarction in non-diabetic subjects.¶Methods. We studied the relations between macroangiopathy and different cardiovascular risk factors and lipid variables in 188 Type II diabetic subjects.¶Results. Multivariate analysis showed that triglycerides, apo C3 and Lp B:C3, sex, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and age were independently associated with macroangiopathy. The study group was divided into quartiles according to apo C3 and Lp B:C3 concentrations: the prevalence of macroangiopathy and coronary heart disease were increased in upper quartiles.¶Conclusion/interpretation. Triglycerides apo C3 and Lp B:C3 were independent cardiovascular risk markers in our group of Type II diabetic patients. [Diabetologia (2000) 43: 703–708]