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Santanu Mahato – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Intra-Puparial Development of Flesh Fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae)
    Current Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shuvra Kanti Sinha, Santanu Mahato

    Abstract:

    Intra-puparial development of forensically important and myiasis-producing flesh fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae) was studied. In the laboratory, second-generation pupae (n = 240) were dissected and photographed using digital camera and SEM for more elaborative description. Intrapuparial development of this species was studied with the description of larva-pupa Apolysis phase, cryptocephalic pupa, phanerocephalic pupa and pharate adult stages. Total time for pupal development was about 252 h under laboratory conditions.

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  • Intra-Puparial Development of Flesh Fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae)
    Current Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shuvra Kanti Sinha, Santanu Mahato

    Abstract:

    Intra-puparial development of forensically important and myiasis-producing flesh fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae) was studied. In the laboratory, second-generation pupae (n = 240) were dissected and photographed using digital camera and SEM for more elaborative description. Intrapuparial development of this species was studied with the description of larva-pupa Apolysis phase, cryptocephalic pupa, phanerocephalic pupa and pharate adult stages. Total time for pupal development was about 252 h under laboratory conditions.

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Thomas A. Keil – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Morphogenesis of the antenna of the male silkmoth, Antheraea polyphemus. V. Development of the peripheral nervous system.
    Tissue and Cell, 1995
    Co-Authors: Cornelia Steiner, Thomas A. Keil

    Abstract:

    Abstract The imaginal antenna of the male silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus is a feather-shaped structure consisting of about 30 flagellomeres, each of which gives off two pairs of side branches. During the pupal stage (lasting for 3 weeks), the antenna develops from a leaf-shaped, flattened epidermal sac (‘antennal blade’) via two series of incisions which proceed from the periphery towards the prospective antennal stem. The development of the peripheral nervous system was studied by staining the neurons with an antibody against horseradish peroxidase as well as by electron microscopy. The epithelium is subdivided in segmentally arranged sensillogenic regions alternating with non-sensillogenic regions. Immediately after Apolysis, clusters consisting of 5 sensory neurons each and belonging to the prospective sensilla chaetica can be localized at the periphery of the antennal blade in the sensillogenic regions. During the first day following Apolysis, the primordia of ca. 70 000 olfactory sensilla arise in the sensillogenic regions. Axons from their neurons are collected in segmentally arranged nerves which run towards the CNS along the dorsal as well as the ventral epidermis and are enveloped by a glial sheath. This ‘primary innervation pattern’ is completed within the second day after Apolysis. A first wave of incisions (‘primary incisions’) subdivide the antennal blade into segmental ‘double branches’ without disturbing the innervation pattern. Then a second wave of incisions (‘secondary incisions’) splits the double branches into single antennal branches. During this process, the segmental nerves and their glial sheaths are disintegrated. The axons are then redistributed into single branch nerves while their glial sheath is reconstituted, forming the ‘secondary’, or adult, innervation pattern. The epidermis is backed by a basal lamina which is degraded after outgrowth of the axons, but is reconstituted after formation of the single antennal branches.

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  • Morphogenesis of the antenna of the male silkmoth, Antheraea polyphemus. IV. Segmentation and branch formation.
    Tissue and Cell, 1993
    Co-Authors: Cornelia Steiner, Thomas A. Keil

    Abstract:

    Abstract The imaginal antenna of the male silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus is a featherlike structure; its flagellum consists of about 30 stem segments each giving off two pairs of side branches. The antenna develops during the pupal stage (lasting in total about 21 days) from a leaf-shaped anlage by incisions proceeding from the periphery towards the prospective antennal stem. Primary incisions, starting about 3 days after Apolysis, form double branches, which arethen split into single branches by parallel running secondary incisions. The initial pattern of tracheae and peripheral nerves is completely rearranged during these morphogenetic processes which are finished 9–10 days after Apolysis. In Antheraea the dorsal and ventral epithelial monolayers of the antennal anlage are successively subdivided during development into a pattern of repetitive epithelial zones. Within the first day after Apolysis alternating stripes of sensillogenic and non-sensillogenic epithelium are differentiating. Then the latter are further subdivided, and at last four different stripelike zones (I–IV) can be discriminated. Long basal protrusions of the epidermal cells (‘epidermal feet’), and most probably haemocytes, seem to be involved in the reconstruction of the epithelium: both show characteristic arrangements within the antennal anlage during successive developmental stages.

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  • Fine structure of a developing insect olfactory organ: morphogenesis of the silkmoth antenna.
    Microscopy Research and Technique, 1992
    Co-Authors: Thomas A. Keil

    Abstract:

    The olfactory organ of the silkmoth Antheraea polyhemus is the feathered antenna which carries about 70,000 olfactory sensilla in the male. It develops within 3 weeks from a leaf-shaped epidermal sac by means of segmental primary and secondary indentations which proceed from the periphery towards the centerline. During the first day post-Apolysis, the antennal epidermis differentiates into segmentally arranged, alternating sensillogenic and non-sensillogenic regions. Within the first 2 days post-Apolysis, the anlagen of olfactory sensilla arise from electron-dense mother cells in the sensillogenic epidermis. The axons of the developing sensilla begin to form the primary innervation pattern during the second day. The sensilla develop approximately within the first 10 days to their final shape, while the indentations are completed during the same period of time. The indentations are most probably driven by long basal extensions of epidermal cells, the epidermal feet. Primary indentations follow the course of segmentally arranged tracheal bundles and form the segments of the antenna. The secondary indentations follow the course of the primary segmental nerves which are reconstructed by this process. During the remaining time of development, the cuticle of the antenna and the sensory hairs is secreted by the epidermal and the hair-forming cells. © 1992 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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Shuvra Kanti Sinha – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Intra-Puparial Development of Flesh Fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae)
    Current Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shuvra Kanti Sinha, Santanu Mahato

    Abstract:

    Intra-puparial development of forensically important and myiasis-producing flesh fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae) was studied. In the laboratory, second-generation pupae (n = 240) were dissected and photographed using digital camera and SEM for more elaborative description. Intrapuparial development of this species was studied with the description of larva-pupa Apolysis phase, cryptocephalic pupa, phanerocephalic pupa and pharate adult stages. Total time for pupal development was about 252 h under laboratory conditions.

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  • Intra-Puparial Development of Flesh Fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae)
    Current Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Shuvra Kanti Sinha, Santanu Mahato

    Abstract:

    Intra-puparial development of forensically important and myiasis-producing flesh fly Sarcophaga dux (Thomson) (Diptera, Sarcophagidae) was studied. In the laboratory, second-generation pupae (n = 240) were dissected and photographed using digital camera and SEM for more elaborative description. Intrapuparial development of this species was studied with the description of larva-pupa Apolysis phase, cryptocephalic pupa, phanerocephalic pupa and pharate adult stages. Total time for pupal development was about 252 h under laboratory conditions.

    Free Register to Access Article