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Application Control

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Jo-mae B. Maris – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Toward iconic-based information technology and Application Control exception messages: Working paper series–07-09
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: T. S. Amer, Jo-mae B. Maris

    Abstract:

    Users of information technology (IT) commonly encounter exception messages during their interactions with Application programs. Exception messages are an important element in accounting Application Controls which address exposures within specific computer Application programs such as payroll, sales processing, and cash disbursements. Exception messages are similar in purpose to the warning messages that appear on consumer products and equipment (e.g., cigarettes, power tools, etc.), in various work environments (e.g., around machinery), and on chemicals. This manuscript reviews the normative elements and information that are included in product, chemical, and environment warnings and proposes that these elements and information should also be included in IT and Application Control exception messages. It is argued that including these elements will increase the effectiveness, informativeness, and consistency of exception messages. Additionally, we report the results of an experiment carried out to determine if IT and Application Control exception messages designed to conform to the normative elements, by specifically including descriptive icons, improves user interactions. The results of the experiment confirm that user’s behavioral compliance increases when interacting with a system that incorporates iconic-based exception messages.

  • signal words and signal icons in Application Control and information technology exception messages hazard matching and habituation effects
    Journal of Information Systems, 2007
    Co-Authors: T. S. Amer, Jo-mae B. Maris

    Abstract:

    Information technology (IT) users encounter signal words (e.g., “Warning”) and signal icons (e.g., an exclamation point) in “exception messages.” The first of two experiments reported in this paper examines the “arousal strength” associated with signal words and icons that commonly appear in exception messages. An elicitation exercise was completed by 316 participants, in which each viewed exception messages containing combinations of signal words and icons and provided their perception as to the severity of a computer problem communicated. The results allow “hazard matching”; whereby, the severity of hazard implied by the exception message can be matched to the level of the hazard. The second experiment reports a strong habituation effect in that users exhibit decreased attention to an exception message after repeated exposure, with a corresponding decrease in compliance. The effect was also found to be mitigated by increasing the arousal strength of the exception message.

T. S. Amer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Toward iconic-based information technology and Application Control exception messages: Working paper series–07-09
    , 2007
    Co-Authors: T. S. Amer, Jo-mae B. Maris

    Abstract:

    Users of information technology (IT) commonly encounter exception messages during their interactions with Application programs. Exception messages are an important element in accounting Application Controls which address exposures within specific computer Application programs such as payroll, sales processing, and cash disbursements. Exception messages are similar in purpose to the warning messages that appear on consumer products and equipment (e.g., cigarettes, power tools, etc.), in various work environments (e.g., around machinery), and on chemicals. This manuscript reviews the normative elements and information that are included in product, chemical, and environment warnings and proposes that these elements and information should also be included in IT and Application Control exception messages. It is argued that including these elements will increase the effectiveness, informativeness, and consistency of exception messages. Additionally, we report the results of an experiment carried out to determine if IT and Application Control exception messages designed to conform to the normative elements, by specifically including descriptive icons, improves user interactions. The results of the experiment confirm that user’s behavioral compliance increases when interacting with a system that incorporates iconic-based exception messages.

  • signal words and signal icons in Application Control and information technology exception messages hazard matching and habituation effects
    Journal of Information Systems, 2007
    Co-Authors: T. S. Amer, Jo-mae B. Maris

    Abstract:

    Information technology (IT) users encounter signal words (e.g., “Warning”) and signal icons (e.g., an exclamation point) in “exception messages.” The first of two experiments reported in this paper examines the “arousal strength” associated with signal words and icons that commonly appear in exception messages. An elicitation exercise was completed by 316 participants, in which each viewed exception messages containing combinations of signal words and icons and provided their perception as to the severity of a computer problem communicated. The results allow “hazard matching”; whereby, the severity of hazard implied by the exception message can be matched to the level of the hazard. The second experiment reports a strong habituation effect in that users exhibit decreased attention to an exception message after repeated exposure, with a corresponding decrease in compliance. The effect was also found to be mitigated by increasing the arousal strength of the exception message.

  • Signal words and signal icons in Application Control and information technology exception messages – Hazard matching and habituation effects: Working paper series–06-05
    , 2006
    Co-Authors: T. S. Amer, J. B. Maris

    Abstract:

    People often encounter warnings in various life situations. These warnings typically include a variety and combination of signal phrases (e.g., “Deadly”) and signal icons (e.g., a skull and cross-bones). Users of information technology (IT) frequently encounter such signal words and icons in “exception messages” that appear on computer screens when the user performs an incorrect action or if a condition could arise that may result in a negative occurrence. For example, in the context of accounting Application Controls which deal with exposures within specific computer Application programs. This paper reports the results of two experiments. The first examines the “arousal strength” associated with various signal words and signal icons that are commonly used in IT exception messages. An elicitation exercise was completed by 316 participants, in which each participant viewed exception messages containing combinations of signal words and signal icons and provided their perception as to the severity of a computer problem communicated by the exception message. The results can be used to achieve “hazard matching,” whereby the severity of hazard that is implied by the signal word and icon within the exception message can be matched to the level of the potential hazard faced by the user. The second experiment investigated the factor of habituation and if the negative results of habituation can be overcome through the design of exception messages. A strong habituation effect was found to exist and the effect was also found to be mitigated by altering the signal word and icon combination of an exception message.

Dong-young Park – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • MoMM – Remote Application Control Technology and Implementation of HTML5-based Smart TV Platform
    Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Advances in Mobile Computing and Multi Media – MoMM '16, 2016
    Co-Authors: Dong-hoon Lee, Jung-hyun Kim, Ho-youn Kim, Dong-young Park

    Abstract:

    As Korea’s standards organization, TTA published the common platform standard for smart TV based on HTML5 web runtime environments. Among the various technical features, this paper introduces a remote Application Control technology in which a companion device, such as smart phone or tablet, can Control the smart TV’s Applications such as Application query, launch, and terminate. It is based on multiscreen technology and the JSON-RPC profile. This paper explains the multiscreen core concept for device discovery and the session connection between the companion device and smart TV, and the definition of the request and response attributes of JSON-RPC to support remote Application Control. We also compare with the technology with the DIAL protocol developed by Netflix as a reference to emphasize the remote Application Control features. Additionally, this paper introduces a VOD service example utilizing the remote Application Control to evaluate the technology’s feasibility with a smart TV emulator implementation.