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Aquifer Recharge

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Xueyan Ye – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Mechanism of Suspended Kaolinite Particle Clogging in Porous Media During Managed Aquifer Recharge.
    Ground Water, 2019
    Co-Authors: Xueyan Ye, Xinqiang Du, Sijia Ma, Jingtong Zhao, Ying Lu

    Abstract:

    : Managed Aquifer Recharge is an effective strategy for urban stormwater management. Chemical ions are normally retained in stormwater and groundwater and may accelerate clogging during the Recharge process. However, the effect of water chemistry on physical clogging has not previously been investigated. In this study, we investigated the hydrogeochemical mechanism of saturated porous media clogging in a series of column experiments. The column was packed with river sand and added suspensions of kaolinite particles. Calcium chloride and sodium chloride are used as representative ions to study chemical effects. We found that an increase in ionic strength resulted in retention of kaolinite solids in the column, with a breakthrough peak of C/C0 value of 1 to 0.2. The corresponding hydraulic conductivity decreased with increased solids clogging. Divalent cations were also found to have a greater influence on kaolinite particle clogging than monovalent cations. The enhanced hydrochemical-related clogging was caused by kaolinite solids flocculating and increasing the deposition rate coefficient by 1 to 2 times in high ionic strength conditions. Three clogging mechanisms of kaolinite solids are proposed: surface filtration, inner blocking, and attachment. This study further deepens the understanding of the mechanisms of solids clogging during Aquifer Recharge and demonstrates the significance of ionic strength on Recharge clogging risk assessments.

  • surface clogging process modeling of suspended solids during urban stormwater Aquifer Recharge
    Journal of Environmental Sciences-china, 2012
    Co-Authors: Zijia Wang, Xinqiang Du, Yuesuo Yang, Xueyan Ye

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aquifer Recharge, which uses urban stormwater, is an effective technique to control the negative effects of groundwater overexploitation, while clogging problems in infiltration systems remain the key restricting factor in broadening its practice. Quantitative understanding of the clogging process is still very poor. A laboratory study was conducted to understand surface physical clogging processes, with the primary aim of developing a model for predicting suspended solid clogging processes before Aquifer Recharge projects start. The experiments investigated the clogging characteristics of different suspended solid sizes in Recharge water by using a series of one-dimensional fine quartz sand columns. The results showed that the smaller the suspended particles in Recharge water, the farther the distance of movement and the larger the scope of clogging in porous media. Clogging extents in fine sand were 1 cm, for suspended particle size ranging from 0.075 to 0.0385 mm, and 2 cm, for particles less than 0.0385 mm. In addition, clogging development occurred more rapidly for smaller suspended solid particles. It took 48, 42, and 36 hr respectively, for large-, medium-, and small-sized particles to reach pre-determined clogging standards. An empirical formula and iteration model for the surface clogging evolution process were derived. The verification results obtained from stormwater Recharge into fine sand demonstrated that the model could reflect the real laws of the surface clogging process.

Yuesuo Yang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • surface clogging process modeling of suspended solids during urban stormwater Aquifer Recharge
    Journal of Environmental Sciences-china, 2012
    Co-Authors: Zijia Wang, Xinqiang Du, Yuesuo Yang, Xueyan Ye

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aquifer Recharge, which uses urban stormwater, is an effective technique to control the negative effects of groundwater overexploitation, while clogging problems in infiltration systems remain the key restricting factor in broadening its practice. Quantitative understanding of the clogging process is still very poor. A laboratory study was conducted to understand surface physical clogging processes, with the primary aim of developing a model for predicting suspended solid clogging processes before Aquifer Recharge projects start. The experiments investigated the clogging characteristics of different suspended solid sizes in Recharge water by using a series of one-dimensional fine quartz sand columns. The results showed that the smaller the suspended particles in Recharge water, the farther the distance of movement and the larger the scope of clogging in porous media. Clogging extents in fine sand were 1 cm, for suspended particle size ranging from 0.075 to 0.0385 mm, and 2 cm, for particles less than 0.0385 mm. In addition, clogging development occurred more rapidly for smaller suspended solid particles. It took 48, 42, and 36 hr respectively, for large-, medium-, and small-sized particles to reach pre-determined clogging standards. An empirical formula and iteration model for the surface clogging evolution process were derived. The verification results obtained from stormwater Recharge into fine sand demonstrated that the model could reflect the real laws of the surface clogging process.

Kim Alexander – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • key dimensions of public acceptance for managed Aquifer Recharge of urban stormwater
    Journal of Cleaner Production, 2015
    Co-Authors: Aditi Mankad, Andrea Walton, Kim Alexander

    Abstract:

    Abstract The present study qualitatively explored psychological and policy-related factors underpinning community acceptance of treated urban stormwater for domestic uses, as well as community views regarding managed Aquifer Recharge for stormwater treatment and delivery. Participants ( N  = 36) took part in 2-h community workshops and focus groups, where they discussed existing knowledge and perceptions of stormwater and managed Aquifer Recharge. Results showed a high general acceptance for managed Aquifer Recharge using stormwater. Nine key social dimensions were found to be indicators of acceptance for stormwater: 1. Fair distribution of treated stormwater, 2. Trust in managed Aquifer Recharge technology and scientific information, 3. Environmental impact of managed Aquifer Recharge, 4. Cost of treating and distributing stormwater, 5. Wastage of stormwater if not utilised, 6. Issues relating to future water security, 7. Water quality, 8. Education, and 9. Perceived effectiveness of the stormwater scheme. These important dimensions and drivers of acceptance emerged within the data, highlighting what is important to an urban community with respect to acceptance of managed Aquifer Recharge of stormwater for potable and non-potable uses. A proposed model of social acceptance is presented, incorporating the policy-related characteristics, psychological factors and communication factors which emerged during the qualitative analysis as predictors of social acceptance for the managed Aquifer Recharge of stormwater. This model helps to conceptualise how the public perceives the use of stormwater in the home, and how public opinion of stormwater sits relative to other forms of alternative water, such as recycled water and rainwater. It is seems that public acceptance for stormwater is higher than for other types of alternative water, which is a significant finding in this research area. Future research can further explore the predictive nature of the hypothesised relationships between perceptions and intentions to use stormwater and water use behaviours.