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Arabian Gulf

The Experts below are selected from a list of 312 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Marouane Temimi – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • An empirical algorithm for retreiving salinity in the Arabian Gulf: Application to Landsat-8 data
    2016 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi

    Abstract:

    The Arabian Gulf is located in an arid region in the Middle East. Salinity in the Arabian Gulf can exceed 43 practical salinity units (psu) caused by high evaporation, low precipitation, and desalination discharge. In this study, a regional algorithm to retrieve salinity was developed using in situ measurements conducted between June 2013 and November 2014 along the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multivariate linear regression model was proposed, which resulted in a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.7. Then the algorithm was applied to Landsat-8 data, which revealed the spatial distribution of salinity over the Arabian Gulf with high values in coastal waters while low values in offshore waters. The findings can assist in better understanding of the water mass exchange between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman through the Strait of Hormuz, assessing the accuracy of salinity from numerical models, illustrating the seasonal and inter-annual variations of salinity in the saline Arabian Gulf, etc.

  • IGARSS – An empirical algorithm for retreiving salinity in the Arabian Gulf: Application to Landsat-8 data
    2016 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi

    Abstract:

    The Arabian Gulf is located in an arid region in the Middle East. Salinity in the Arabian Gulf can exceed 43 practical salinity units (psu) caused by high evaporation, low precipitation, and desalination discharge. In this study, a regional algorithm to retrieve salinity was developed using in situ measurements conducted between June 2013 and November 2014 along the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multivariate linear regression model was proposed, which resulted in a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.7. Then the algorithm was applied to Landsat-8 data, which revealed the spatial distribution of salinity over the Arabian Gulf with high values in coastal waters while low values in offshore waters. The findings can assist in better understanding of the water mass exchange between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman through the Strait of Hormuz, assessing the accuracy of salinity from numerical models, illustrating the seasonal and inter-annual variations of salinity in the saline Arabian Gulf, etc.

  • modeling of circulation in the Arabian Gulf and the sea of oman skill assessment and seasonal thermohaline structure
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi, Muchamad Al Azhar, Hosni Ghedira

    Abstract:

    Hindcast simulations of the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) are quantitatively evaluated with basin-wide hydrographic data and time series measurements. The model shows comparable skill in reproducing moored observations of current velocities structure in upper and bottom depths. The skill in simulating observed temperature is higher of 0.93 (scale 0–1) in upper depths compared to 0.52 in bottom depths. Model results are sensitive to parameterization of water clarity. A lower sensitivity was noticed to KPP, GLS, and MY2.5 turbulence closures. When coastal turbid water parameterization is used, accuracy of the model in reproducing seasonal and spatial variations of temperature and salinity increased by 25% compared to the clear water case whereas only 10% increase was noticed when applying KPP turbulent closure. The model reproduces well anticlockwise circulation in the Gulf. A stronger surface inflow of fresher water to the Arabian Gulf through the Strait of Hormuz is simulated in summer compared to winter conditions, mainly due to upper layer horizontal gradient of density between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman. Less seasonal variability of outflow between 0.15 and 0.20 m s−1 at 50 m to bottom depth around the Strait of Hormuz was noticed in the model results. Modeled surface layer stratification is stronger in summer than winter and varies spatially in the Arabian Gulf with highest stratification near the Strait of Hormuz. Overall, the stratification in shallow water area of the Arabian Gulf remains low throughout the year.

Jun Zhao – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • An empirical algorithm for retreiving salinity in the Arabian Gulf: Application to Landsat-8 data
    2016 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi

    Abstract:

    The Arabian Gulf is located in an arid region in the Middle East. Salinity in the Arabian Gulf can exceed 43 practical salinity units (psu) caused by high evaporation, low precipitation, and desalination discharge. In this study, a regional algorithm to retrieve salinity was developed using in situ measurements conducted between June 2013 and November 2014 along the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multivariate linear regression model was proposed, which resulted in a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.7. Then the algorithm was applied to Landsat-8 data, which revealed the spatial distribution of salinity over the Arabian Gulf with high values in coastal waters while low values in offshore waters. The findings can assist in better understanding of the water mass exchange between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman through the Strait of Hormuz, assessing the accuracy of salinity from numerical models, illustrating the seasonal and inter-annual variations of salinity in the saline Arabian Gulf, etc.

  • IGARSS – An empirical algorithm for retreiving salinity in the Arabian Gulf: Application to Landsat-8 data
    2016 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi

    Abstract:

    The Arabian Gulf is located in an arid region in the Middle East. Salinity in the Arabian Gulf can exceed 43 practical salinity units (psu) caused by high evaporation, low precipitation, and desalination discharge. In this study, a regional algorithm to retrieve salinity was developed using in situ measurements conducted between June 2013 and November 2014 along the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multivariate linear regression model was proposed, which resulted in a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.7. Then the algorithm was applied to Landsat-8 data, which revealed the spatial distribution of salinity over the Arabian Gulf with high values in coastal waters while low values in offshore waters. The findings can assist in better understanding of the water mass exchange between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman through the Strait of Hormuz, assessing the accuracy of salinity from numerical models, illustrating the seasonal and inter-annual variations of salinity in the saline Arabian Gulf, etc.

  • modeling of circulation in the Arabian Gulf and the sea of oman skill assessment and seasonal thermohaline structure
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, Marouane Temimi, Muchamad Al Azhar, Hosni Ghedira

    Abstract:

    Hindcast simulations of the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) are quantitatively evaluated with basin-wide hydrographic data and time series measurements. The model shows comparable skill in reproducing moored observations of current velocities structure in upper and bottom depths. The skill in simulating observed temperature is higher of 0.93 (scale 0–1) in upper depths compared to 0.52 in bottom depths. Model results are sensitive to parameterization of water clarity. A lower sensitivity was noticed to KPP, GLS, and MY2.5 turbulence closures. When coastal turbid water parameterization is used, accuracy of the model in reproducing seasonal and spatial variations of temperature and salinity increased by 25% compared to the clear water case whereas only 10% increase was noticed when applying KPP turbulent closure. The model reproduces well anticlockwise circulation in the Gulf. A stronger surface inflow of fresher water to the Arabian Gulf through the Strait of Hormuz is simulated in summer compared to winter conditions, mainly due to upper layer horizontal gradient of density between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman. Less seasonal variability of outflow between 0.15 and 0.20 m s−1 at 50 m to bottom depth around the Strait of Hormuz was noticed in the model results. Modeled surface layer stratification is stronger in summer than winter and varies spatially in the Arabian Gulf with highest stratification near the Strait of Hormuz. Overall, the stratification in shallow water area of the Arabian Gulf remains low throughout the year.

John A. Burt – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Arabian Gulf reef fishes: a valuable but vulnerable asset for climate change research
    QScience Proceedings, 2015
    Co-Authors: John A. Burt

    Abstract:

    The Arabian Gulf is one of the most thermally extreme marine environments on earth, representing a unique ‘natural laboratory’ in which to develop an understanding of how reef fishes may respond to future climate change. Recent research comparing fish in the southern Arabian Gulf with those on reefs in the more benign Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea has provided insights into how reef fish communities, populations and individuals may respond to increasingly extreme temperatures in other regions. Reef fish communities in the southern Arabian Gulf were shown to be low in species diversity, abundance, and biomass compared with those on reefs in less extreme environments. Arabian Gulf reef fish communities were also functionally distinct, with coral-dependent fishes and important functional groups such as parrotfish being relatively rare. Demographic studies of several species have shown that the extreme thermal environment of the southern Gulf is associated with faster growth rates than conspecifics outside of the Gulf, but that these fish mature at significantly smaller sizes, which may have implications for reproduction and population replenishment. Such studies can provide insight into how populations and communities in other regions may respond as sea temperatures increase in the future. While Arabian Gulf reef fish represent a valuable asset for understanding biological responses to extreme temperatures, they are not immune to the growing pressure of climate change in the region itself. Recent experiments have shown that while Arabian Gulf reef fishes may have the capacity to survive higher temperatures than conspecifics in surrounding seas fish in the Gulf are living very near their physiological limits, suggesting that they are likely to be highly susceptible to even modest increases in seawater temperature. Climate change is also likely to have indirect effects on reef fishes in the Gulf through increased habitat loss, with all coral dependent fishes known for the Gulf already classified as vulnerable to extinction as a result of reef degradation in recent decades. There are also considerable gaps in knowledge of how ocean acidification may affect reef fishes, particularly the more vulnerable larval stages, and how this may synergize with thermal and other anthropogenic stressors.

  • the environmental costs of coastal urbanization in the Arabian Gulf
    City, 2014
    Co-Authors: John A. Burt

    Abstract:

    Coastal urbanization has expanded rapidly in recent decades in the Arabian Gulf and this has put increasing pressure on important but underappreciated coastal ecosystems throughout the region. Unlike the relatively barren terrestrial system, coastlines in the Gulf contain a mosaic of highly productive ecosystems, including sabkhas, mudflats, mangrove swamps, seagrasses and coral reefs, among others, that provide food and habitat for diverse ecological communities and support over half a billion dollars in fisheries activities annually. In recent years there has been accelerating loss and degradation of each of these systems as a result of cumulative impacts from coastal development, overfishing, industrial expansion and other population-driven stressors, and the Arabian Gulf is now considered among the most degraded marine eco-regions in the world. The future of this unique and valuable system is now at stake, and only with rapid and dramatic changes in coastal policy, regulation and management can we hop…