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Araneidae

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Jober Fernando Sobczak – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a new record of a host parasitoid interaction hymenoepimecis veranii lofredo penteado dias 2009 hymenoptera ichneumonidae parasitizing araneus orgaos levi 1991 araneae Araneidae
    Journal of Insect Behavior, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jober Fernando Sobczak, Yuri Fanchini Messas, Hebert Da Silva Souza, Joao Vasconcellosneto

    Abstract:

    The genus Hymenoepimecis only occurs in the Neotropics. In some species of this genus, the larval stage modifies the behavior of the spider hosts, inducing then to construct a modified web. The wasp Hymenoepimecis veranii has been previously described as an ectoparasitoid of the spider Araneus omnicolor. This study provides detailed information about the natural history of the host-parasitoid interaction involving this wasp with a new host, the spider Araneus orgaos (Araneae: Araneidae), which occurs sympatrically with A. omnicolor.

  • A New Record of a Host-Parasitoid Interaction: Hymenoepimecis veranii Lofredo & Penteado-Dias, 2009 (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) Parasitizing Araneus orgaos Levi, 1991 (Araneae: Araneidae)
    Journal of Insect Behavior, 2014
    Co-Authors: Jober Fernando Sobczak, Yuri Fanchini Messas, Hebert Da Silva Souza, João Vasconcellos-neto

    Abstract:

    The genus Hymenoepimecis only occurs in the Neotropics. In some species of this genus, the larval stage modifies the behavior of the spider hosts, inducing then to construct a modified web. The wasp Hymenoepimecis veranii has been previously described as an ectoparasitoid of the spider Araneus omnicolor. This study provides detailed information about the natural history of the host-parasitoid interaction involving this wasp with a new host, the spider Araneus orgaos (Araneae: Araneidae), which occurs sympatrically with A. omnicolor.

Volker W. Framenau – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Lariniophora, a new monotypic orb-weaving spider genus from Australia (Araneae: Araneidae: Araneinae)
    Records of the western Australian Museum, 2020
    Co-Authors: Volker W. Framenau

    Abstract:

    A new monotypic genus of orb-weaving spider (Araneidae Clerck, 1758) within the subfamily Araneinae Clerck, 1758 is established: Lariniophora, with L. ragnhildae (Strand, 1917) as type and sole species. The somatic morphology of Lariniophora is similar to Larinia Simon, 1874 and allied genera, however, their genitalia differ considerably. A phylogenetic analysis established close a relationship between Lariniophora and Eriophora Simon, 1864 with which it shares a paramedian apophysis as a long basal extension of the conductor in the male pedipalp. The epigyne is unique within the Araneidae and is composed of an elevated plate and a narrow long scape. Specimens of L. ragnhildae have mainly been found in arid regions of Western Australia but also in the Northern Territory, Queensland, and South Australia. Here these spiders built a conventional orb-web in low shrubs and grassland. Mature spiders have been found between February and October suggesting reproductive activity in winter.

  • phylogeny of the orb weaving spider family Araneidae araneae araneoidea
    Cladistics, 2020
    Co-Authors: Volker W. Framenau, Nikolaj Scharff, Jonathan A Coddington, Todd A Blackledge, Ingi Agnarsson, Tamas Szűts

    Abstract:

    We present a new phylogeny of the spider family Araneidae based on five genes (28S, 18S, COI, H3 and 16S) for 158 taxa, identified and mainly sequenced by us. This includes 25 outgroups and 133 araneid ingroups representing the subfamilies Zygiellinae Simon, 1929, Nephilinae Simon, 1894, and the typical araneids, here informally named the “ARA Clade”. The araneid genera analysed here include roughly 90% of all currently named araneid species. The ARA Clade is the primary focus of this analysis. In taxonomic terms, outgroups comprise 22 genera and 11 families, and the ingroup comprises three Zygiellinae and four Nephilinae genera, and 85 ARA Clade genera (ten new). Within the ARA Clade, we recognize ten informal groups that contain at least three genera each and are supported under Bayesian posterior probabilities (≥ 0.95): “Caerostrines” (Caerostris, Gnolus and Testudinaria), “Micrathenines” (Acacesia, Micrathena, Ocrepeira, Scoloderus and Verrucosa), “Eriophorines” (Acanthepeira, Alpaida, Eriophora, Parawixia and Wagneriana), “Backobourkiines” (Acroaspis, Backobourkia, Carepalxis, Novakiella, Parawixia, Plebs, Singa and three new genera), “Argiopines” (Arachnura, Acusilas, Argiope, Cyrtophora, Gea, Lariniaria and Mecynogea), “Cyrtarachnines” (Aranoethra, Cyrtarachne, Paraplectana, Pasilobus and Poecilopachys), “Mastophorines” (Celaenia, Exechocentrus and Mastophora,), “Nuctenines” (Larinia, Larinioides and Nuctenea), “Zealaraneines” (Colaranea, Cryptaranea, Paralarinia, Zealaranea and two new genera) and “Gasteracanthines” (Augusta, Acrosomoides, Austracantha, Gasteracantha, Isoxya, Macracantha, Madacantha, Parmatergus and Thelacantha). Few of these groups are currently corroborated by morphology, behaviour, natural history or biogeography. We also include the large genus Araneus, along with Aculepeira, Agalenatea, Anepsion, Araniella, Cercidia, Chorizopes, Cyclosa, Dolophones, Eriovixia, Eustala, Gibbaranea, Hingstepeira, Hypognatha, Kaira, Larinia, Mangora, Metazygia, Metepeira, Neoscona, Paraplectanoides, Perilla, Poltys, Pycnacantha, Spilasma and Telaprocera, but the placement of these genera was generally ambiguous, except for Paraplectanoides, which is strongly supported as sister to traditional Nephilinae. Araneus, Argiope, Eriophora and Larinia are polyphyletic, Araneus implying nine new taxa of genus rank, and Eriophora and Larinia two each. In Araneus and Eriophora, polyphyly was usually due to north temperate generic concepts being used as dumping grounds for species from southern hemisphere regions, e.g. South-East Asia, Australia or New Zealand. Although Araneidae is one of the better studied spider families, too little natural history and/or morphological data are available across these terminals to draw any strong evolutionary conclusions. However, the classical orb web is reconstructed as plesiomorphic for Araneidae, with a single loss in “cyrtarachnines”–“mastophorines”. Web decorations (collectively known as stabilimenta) evolved perhaps five times. Sexual dimorphism generally results from female body size increase with few exceptions; dimorphic taxa are not monophyletic and revert to monomorphism in a few cases.

  • Phylogeny of the orb‐weaving spider family Araneidae (Araneae: Araneoidea)
    Cladistics, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nikolaj Scharff, Volker W. Framenau, Jonathan A Coddington, Todd A Blackledge, Tamas Szűts, Ingi Agnarsson, Cheryl Y. Hayashi, Dimitar Dimitrov

    Abstract:

    We present a new phylogeny of the spider family Araneidae based on five genes (28S, 18S, COI, H3 and 16S) for 158 taxa, identified and mainly sequenced by us. This includes 25 outgroups and 133 araneid ingroups representing the subfamilies Zygiellinae Simon, 1929, Nephilinae Simon, 1894, and the typical araneids, here informally named the “ARA Clade”. The araneid genera analysed here include roughly 90% of all currently named araneid species. The ARA Clade is the primary focus of this analysis. In taxonomic terms, outgroups comprise 22 genera and 11 families, and the ingroup comprises three Zygiellinae and four Nephilinae genera, and 85 ARA Clade genera (ten new). Within the ARA Clade, we recognize ten informal groups that contain at least three genera each and are supported under Bayesian posterior probabilities (≥ 0.95): “Caerostrines” (Caerostris, Gnolus and Testudinaria), “Micrathenines” (Acacesia, Micrathena, Ocrepeira, Scoloderus and Verrucosa), “Eriophorines” (Acanthepeira, Alpaida, Eriophora, Parawixia and Wagneriana), “Backobourkiines” (Acroaspis, Backobourkia, Carepalxis, Novakiella, Parawixia, Plebs, Singa and three new genera), “Argiopines” (Arachnura, Acusilas, Argiope, Cyrtophora, Gea, Lariniaria and Mecynogea), “Cyrtarachnines” (Aranoethra, Cyrtarachne, Paraplectana, Pasilobus and Poecilopachys), “Mastophorines” (Celaenia, Exechocentrus and Mastophora,), “Nuctenines” (Larinia, Larinioides and Nuctenea), “Zealaraneines” (Colaranea, Cryptaranea, Paralarinia, Zealaranea and two new genera) and “Gasteracanthines” (Augusta, Acrosomoides, Austracantha, Gasteracantha, Isoxya, Macracantha, Madacantha, Parmatergus and Thelacantha). Few of these groups are currently corroborated by morphology, behaviour, natural history or biogeography. We also include the large genus Araneus, along with Aculepeira, Agalenatea, Anepsion, Araniella, Cercidia, Chorizopes, Cyclosa, Dolophones, Eriovixia, Eustala, Gibbaranea, Hingstepeira, Hypognatha, Kaira, Larinia, Mangora, Metazygia, Metepeira, Neoscona, Paraplectanoides, Perilla, Poltys, Pycnacantha, Spilasma and Telaprocera, but the placement of these genera was generally ambiguous, except for Paraplectanoides, which is strongly supported as sister to traditional Nephilinae. Araneus, Argiope, Eriophora and Larinia are polyphyletic, Araneus implying nine new taxa of genus rank, and Eriophora and Larinia two each. In Araneus and Eriophora, polyphyly was usually due to north temperate generic concepts being used as dumping grounds for species from southern hemisphere regions, e.g. South-East Asia, Australia or New Zealand. Although Araneidae is one of the better studied spider families, too little natural history and/or morphological data are available across these terminals to draw any strong evolutionary conclusions. However, the classical orb web is reconstructed as plesiomorphic for Araneidae, with a single loss in “cyrtarachnines”–“mastophorines”. Web decorations (collectively known as stabilimenta) evolved perhaps five times. Sexual dimorphism generally results from female body size increase with few exceptions; dimorphic taxa are not monophyletic and revert to monomorphism in a few cases.

Herbert W Levi – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • new synonymies and a revalidation in the spider genera eustala and micrathena araneae Araneidae
    Zoologia, 2013
    Co-Authors: Herbert W Levi, Adalberto J. Santos

    Abstract:

    In this study, 10 nominal species of Eustala Simon, 1895 are synonymized with other species of the genus, mostly based on matching males and females erroneously described as different species. Parawixia rimosa (Keyserling, 1892) is considered a senior synonym of Eustala decemtuberculata Caporiacco, 1955. Eustala isosceles Mello-Leitao, 1939 is transferred to Kapogea Levi, 1997 and considered a senior synonym of Kapogea alayoi (Archer, 1958) based on abdomen shape and coloration. Micrathena beta Caporiacco, 1947 is redescribed, illustrated and transferred from Linyphiidae back to Araneidae. This species can be easily distinguished from other members of the genus by the male palpus with an enlarged and modified paracymbium and a narrower hook as a conductor. Micrathena sanctispiritus Brignoli, 1983 is removed from the synonymy with M. lindenbergi Mello-Leitao, 1940 and considered a senior synonym of M. guanabara Levi, 1985.

  • a new species of argiope araneae Araneidae from brazil
    Zoologia (Curitiba Impr.), 2009
    Co-Authors: Paulo Cesar Motta, Herbert W Levi

    Abstract:

    A new species of Argiope Audouin, 1826 is described. This is a large Argiope from South America and is found mainly in “cerrado” vegetation in central Brazil. Argiope legionis sp. nov. is most similar to A. ericae LEVI, 2004 but differs from this species by the coloration and epigynum in the female and the median apophysis and embolus of the palpus in the male palp.

  • the south american genus spintharidius araneae Araneidae
    Journal of Arachnology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Herbert W Levi

    Abstract:

    Abstract The name Madrepeira amazonica Levi 1995 is a synonym of Spintharidius rhomboidalis Simon 1893. Spintharidius is currently monospecific.