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Arbutus Menziesii

The Experts below are selected from a list of 183 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Randy Molina – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Arbutus Menziesii ericaceae facilitates regeneration dynamics in mixed evergreen forests by promoting mycorrhizal fungal diversity and host connectivity
    American Journal of Botany, 2012
    Co-Authors: Peter G Kennedy, Dylan P Smith, Tom R Horton, Randy Molina

    Abstract:

     Premise of study: In the mixed evergreen forests in the western United States, Arbutus Menziesii is able to quickly resprout following disturbance and, as such, act as a nurse tree during forest regeneration. The mechanism for this nurse tree effect has frequently been ascribed to mycorrhizal fungi, but no detailed molecular-based studies of the mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with A. Menziesii roots have yet been conducted.  Methods: We examined the structure of the mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with A. Menziesii in varying forest types and seasons and assessed the potential for common mycelial networks between A. Menziesii and Pinaceae hosts, particularly Pseudotsuga Menziesii . Study sites were located in the Klamath-Siskyou region in southern Oregon, United States. Molecular approaches were used to identify the mycorrhizal fungi (ITS rDNA) and plant hosts ( trnL cDNA).  Key results: Arbutus Menziesii hosts a highly diverse mycorrhizal fungal community with similar composition to communities found on other angiosperm and Pinaceae hosts. Phylogenetic analyses of the mycorrhizal genus Piloderma revealed that host species and geographic location had little effect on fungal taxon relatedness. Multihost fungal taxa were signifi cantly more frequent and abundant than single-host fungal taxa, and there was high potential for the formation of common mycelial networks with P. Menziesii .  Conclusions: Our results suggest A. Menziesii is a major hub of mycorrhizal fungal diversity and connectivity in mixed evergreen forests and plays an important role in forest regeneration by enhancing belowground resilience to disturbance.

  • Diversity and host specificity of ectomycorrhizal fungi retrieved from three adjacent forest sites by five host species
    Botany, 1999
    Co-Authors: Hugues B. Massicotte, Randy Molina, Jane E Smith, Linda E. Tackaberry, Michael P. Amaranthus

    Abstract:

    Seedlings of Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl. (grand fir), Lithocarpus densiflora (Hook. & Arn.) Rehd. (tanoak), Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. (ponderosa pine), Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Douglas-fir), and Arbutus Menziesii Pursh (madrone) were planted in mixture and monoculture in soil collected from three adjacent forest sites in southwestern Oregon (a clearcut area, a 25-year-old Douglas-fir plantation, and a mature 90- to 160-year-old Douglas-fir – pine forest) to determine the effect of host tree diversity on retrieval of ectomycorrhizal morphotypes. In this greenhouse bioassay, 18 morphotypes of mycorrhizae were recognized overall from all soils with a total of 55 host-fungus combinations: 14 types with ponderosa pine, 14 with Douglas-fir, 10 with tanoak, 10 with grand fir, and 7 for madrone. Four genus-specific morphotypes were retrieved (three on ponderosa pine and one on Douglas-fir), even in mixture situations, demonstrating selectivity of some fungal propagules by their respective hos…

  • biology of the ectomycorrhizal genus rhizopogon iii influence of co cultured conifer species on mycorrhizal specificity with the arbutoid hosts arctostaphylos uva ursi and Arbutus Menziesii
    New Phytologist, 1997
    Co-Authors: Randy Molina, Jane E Smith, Donaraye Mckay, L H Melville

    Abstract:

    Seedlings of Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, Arbutus Menziesii Pursh., and cuttings of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng were grown in monoculture and in conifer-hardwood dual-culture combinations in the glasshouse and inoculated with spore slurries of six Rhizopogon species. The primary objectives were to assess and compare the pattern of host specificity between symbionts and to study the influence of co-cultured plants on ectomycorrhiza development. The Rhizopogon spp. ranged from genus-specific to multiple-host compatible. In monoculture, four Rhizopogon sp. (R. ellenae Smith, R. occidentalis Zeller & Dodge, R. smithii Hosford and R. subcaerulescens Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pinus ponderosa, and two Rhizopogon sp. (R. parksii Smith and R. vinicolor Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pseudotsuga Menziesii. None of the fungi tested developed ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii or Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in monoculture. In dual culture, three of the four Rhizopogon species (R. ellenae, R. occidentalis and R. subcaerulescens) that formed ectomycorrhizas on Pinus ponderosa, formed some ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. Rhizopogon parksii and R. vinicolor only formed ectomycorrhizas on Pseudotsuga Menziesii.

L H Melville – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • biology of the ectomycorrhizal genus rhizopogon iii influence of co cultured conifer species on mycorrhizal specificity with the arbutoid hosts arctostaphylos uva ursi and Arbutus Menziesii
    New Phytologist, 1997
    Co-Authors: Randy Molina, Jane E Smith, Donaraye Mckay, L H Melville

    Abstract:

    Seedlings of Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, Arbutus Menziesii Pursh., and cuttings of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng were grown in monoculture and in conifer-hardwood dual-culture combinations in the glasshouse and inoculated with spore slurries of six Rhizopogon species. The primary objectives were to assess and compare the pattern of host specificity between symbionts and to study the influence of co-cultured plants on ectomycorrhiza development. The Rhizopogon spp. ranged from genus-specific to multiple-host compatible. In monoculture, four Rhizopogon sp. (R. ellenae Smith, R. occidentalis Zeller & Dodge, R. smithii Hosford and R. subcaerulescens Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pinus ponderosa, and two Rhizopogon sp. (R. parksii Smith and R. vinicolor Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pseudotsuga Menziesii. None of the fungi tested developed ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii or Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in monoculture. In dual culture, three of the four Rhizopogon species (R. ellenae, R. occidentalis and R. subcaerulescens) that formed ectomycorrhizas on Pinus ponderosa, formed some ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. Rhizopogon parksii and R. vinicolor only formed ectomycorrhizas on Pseudotsuga Menziesii.

  • iii influence of co cultured conifer species on mycorrhizal specificity with the arbutoid hosts arctostaphylos uva ursi and Arbutus Menziesii
    , 1997
    Co-Authors: Randy M Olina, Ane J E S Mith, L H Melville

    Abstract:

    summary Seedlings of Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, Arbutus Menziesii Pursh., and cuttings of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng were grown in monoculture and in conifer-hardwood dual-culture combinations in the glasshouse and inoculated with spore slurries of six Rhizopogon species. The primary objectives were to assess and compare the pattern of host specificity between symbionts and to study the influence of co-cultured plants on ectomycorrhiza development. The Rhizopogon spp. ranged from genus-specific to multiple-host compatible. In monoculture, four Rhizopogon sp. (R. ellenae Smith, R. occidentalis Zeller & Dodge, R. smithii Hosford and R. subcaerulescens Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pinus ponderosa, and two Rhizopogon sp. (R. parksii Smith and R. vinicolor Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pseudotsuga Menziesii. None of the fungi tested developed ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii or Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in monoculture. In dual culture, three of the four Rhizopogon species (R. ellenae, R. occidentalis and R. subcaerulescens) that formed ectomycorrhizas on Pinus ponderosa, formed some ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. Rhizopogon parksii and R. vinicolor only formed ectomycorrhizas on Pseudotsuga Menziesii.

Jane E Smith – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Mycorrhiza-like interaction by Morchella with species of the Pinaceae in pure culture synthesis
    Mycorrhiza, 2000
    Co-Authors: J. L. Dahlstrom, Jane E Smith, N. S. Weber

    Abstract:

    Isolates from two species of Morchella were tested for ability to form mycorrhizae in pure culture synthesis with Arbutus Menziesii, Larix occidentalis, Pinus contorta, Pinus ponderosa, andPseudotsuga Menziesii. Ectomycorrhizal structures (mantle and Hartig net) formed with the four species of the Pinaceae but not with A. Menziesii. Results are compared to previous studies on morel mycorrhizae and discussed in an ecological context.

  • Diversity and host specificity of ectomycorrhizal fungi retrieved from three adjacent forest sites by five host species
    Botany, 1999
    Co-Authors: Hugues B. Massicotte, Randy Molina, Jane E Smith, Linda E. Tackaberry, Michael P. Amaranthus

    Abstract:

    Seedlings of Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl. (grand fir), Lithocarpus densiflora (Hook. & Arn.) Rehd. (tanoak), Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. (ponderosa pine), Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Douglas-fir), and Arbutus Menziesii Pursh (madrone) were planted in mixture and monoculture in soil collected from three adjacent forest sites in southwestern Oregon (a clearcut area, a 25-year-old Douglas-fir plantation, and a mature 90- to 160-year-old Douglas-fir – pine forest) to determine the effect of host tree diversity on retrieval of ectomycorrhizal morphotypes. In this greenhouse bioassay, 18 morphotypes of mycorrhizae were recognized overall from all soils with a total of 55 host-fungus combinations: 14 types with ponderosa pine, 14 with Douglas-fir, 10 with tanoak, 10 with grand fir, and 7 for madrone. Four genus-specific morphotypes were retrieved (three on ponderosa pine and one on Douglas-fir), even in mixture situations, demonstrating selectivity of some fungal propagules by their respective hos…

  • biology of the ectomycorrhizal genus rhizopogon iii influence of co cultured conifer species on mycorrhizal specificity with the arbutoid hosts arctostaphylos uva ursi and Arbutus Menziesii
    New Phytologist, 1997
    Co-Authors: Randy Molina, Jane E Smith, Donaraye Mckay, L H Melville

    Abstract:

    Seedlings of Pseudotsuga Menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws, Arbutus Menziesii Pursh., and cuttings of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng were grown in monoculture and in conifer-hardwood dual-culture combinations in the glasshouse and inoculated with spore slurries of six Rhizopogon species. The primary objectives were to assess and compare the pattern of host specificity between symbionts and to study the influence of co-cultured plants on ectomycorrhiza development. The Rhizopogon spp. ranged from genus-specific to multiple-host compatible. In monoculture, four Rhizopogon sp. (R. ellenae Smith, R. occidentalis Zeller & Dodge, R. smithii Hosford and R. subcaerulescens Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pinus ponderosa, and two Rhizopogon sp. (R. parksii Smith and R. vinicolor Smith) formed ectomycorrhizas with Pseudotsuga Menziesii. None of the fungi tested developed ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii or Arctostaphylos uva-ursi in monoculture. In dual culture, three of the four Rhizopogon species (R. ellenae, R. occidentalis and R. subcaerulescens) that formed ectomycorrhizas on Pinus ponderosa, formed some ectomycorrhizas on Arbutus Menziesii and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. Rhizopogon parksii and R. vinicolor only formed ectomycorrhizas on Pseudotsuga Menziesii.