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Arc Lamps

The Experts below are selected from a list of 174 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mark M. Somoza – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficienlty coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of galium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficiency of these LEDs offers substantial practical, economic and ecological advantages, including faster synthesis, lower hardware costs, very long lifetime, a >85-fold reduction in electricity consumption and the elimination of mercury waste and contamination. KEYWORDS:

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficiently coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of gallium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficie…

Kathrin Hölz – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficienlty coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of galium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficiency of these LEDs offers substantial practical, economic and ecological advantages, including faster synthesis, lower hardware costs, very long lifetime, a >85-fold reduction in electricity consumption and the elimination of mercury waste and contamination. KEYWORDS:

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficiently coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of gallium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficie…

Jory Lietard – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, 2017
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficienlty coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of galium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficiency of these LEDs offers substantial practical, economic and ecological advantages, including faster synthesis, lower hardware costs, very long lifetime, a >85-fold reduction in electricity consumption and the elimination of mercury waste and contamination. KEYWORDS:

  • High-Power 365 nm UV LED Mercury Arc Lamp Replacement for Photochemistry and Chemical Photolithography
    ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kathrin Hölz, Jory Lietard, Mark M. Somoza

    Abstract:

    Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have become widespread in chemical reseArch as highly efficient light sources for photochemistry and photopolymerization. However, in more complex experimental setups requiring highly concentrated light and highly spatially resolved patterning of the light, high-pressure mercury Arc Lamps are still widely used because they emit intense UV light from a compact Arc volume that can be efficiently coupled into optical systems. Advances in the deposition and p-type doping of gallium nitride have recently permitted the manufacture of UV LEDs capable of replacing mercury Arc Lamps also in these applications. These UV LEDs exceed the spectral radiance of mercury Lamps even at the intense I-line at 365 nm. Here we present the successful exchange of a high-pressure mercury Arc lamp for a new generation UV LED as a light source in photolithographic chemistry and its use in the fabrication of high-density DNA microarrays. We show that the improved light radiance and efficie…