Architectural Plan - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab


Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Architectural Plan

The Experts below are selected from a list of 29610 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Architectural Plan – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

William Pitt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Architectural Plan for Foy and Gibson: Wattle Street Elevation
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: William Pitt

    Abstract:

    Architectural Plan for Foy and Gibson building on corner of Wattle Street and Chapel Street Prahran. Primary inscriptions: ‘Wattle Street Elevation’ and ’73’. Architect: William Pitt.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Architectural Plan for Foy and Gibson: Tinware Factory
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: William Pitt

    Abstract:

    Architectural Plan for Foy and Gibson tinware factory in Collingwood. Primary inscriptions: ‘Tinware Factory / Foy & Gibson’, ‘Cambridge St’, and ‘Oxford street’. Also stamped and dated with William Pitt’s stamp ‘476 Collins Street’. Architect: William Pitt

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Architectural Plan for Foy and Gibson: New Warehouse, Smith Street
    , 2017
    Co-Authors: William Pitt

    Abstract:

    Architectural Plan of the frontage of the Foy and Gibson new warehouse on Smith Street. Primary inscriptions: ‘Messrs Foy and Gibson / New Warehouse / Smith Street’ and ‘William Pitt. F.R.V.I.A / Architect Etc. / 476 Collins St / Melbourne’. Architect: William Pitt

    Free Register to Access Article

A. Koutamanis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development of a computerized handbook of Architectural Plans : Ontwikkeling van een gecomputeriseerd handboek van architectonische plattegronden
    , 1990
    Co-Authors: A. Koutamanis

    Abstract:

    The dissertation investigates an approach to the development of visual / spatial computer representations for Architectural purposes through the development of the computerized handbook of Architectural Plans (chap), a knowledge-based computer system capable of recognizing the metric properties of Architectural Plans. This investigation can be summarized as an introduction of computer vision to the computerization of Architectural representations: chap represents an attempt to automate recognition of the most essential among conventional Architectural drawings, floor Plans. The system accepts as input digitized images of Architectural Plans and recognizes their spatial primitives (locations) and their spatial articulation on a variety of abstraction levels. The final output of chap is a description of the Plan in terms of the grouping formations detected in its spatial articulation. The overall structure of the description is based on an analysis of its conformity to the formal rules of its stylistic context (which in the initial version of chap is classical architecture).
    Chapter 1 suggests that the poor performance of computerized Architectural drawing and design systems is among others evidence of the necessity to computerize visual / spatial Architectural representations. A recognition system such as chap offers comprehensive means for the investigation of a methodology for the development and use of such representations.
    Chapter 2 describes a fundamental task of chap: recognition of the position and shape of locations, the atomic parts of the description of an Architectural Plan in chap. This operation represents the final and most significant part of the first stage in processing an image input in machine environment.
    Chapter 3 moves to the next significant problem, recognition of the spatial arrangement of locations in an Architectural Plan, that is, recognition of grouping relationships that determine the subdivision of a Plan into parts. In the absence of systematic and exhaustive typologic studies of classical architecture that would allow us to define a repertory of the location group types possible in classical Architectural Plans, Chapter 3 follows a bottom-up approach based on grouping relationships derived from elementary Architectural knowledge and formalized with assistance from Gestalt theory and its antecedents. The grouping process described in Chapter 3 corresponds both in purpose and in structure to the derivation of a description of an image in computer vision [Marr 1982].
    Chapter 4 investigates the well-formedness of the description of a classical Architectural Plan in an analytical manner: each relevant level (or sublevel) of the classical canon according to Tzonis & Lefaivre [1986] is transformed into a single group of criteria of well-formedness which is investigated independently. The hierarchical structure of the classical canon determines the coordination of these criteria into a sequence of cognitive filters which progressively analyses the correspondence of the descriptions derived as in Chapter 3 to the constraints of the canon.
    The methodology and techniques presented in the dissertation are primarily considered with respect to chap, a specific recognition system. The resulting specification of chap gives a measure of the use of such a system within the context of a computerized collection of Architectural precedents and also presents several extensions to other areas of architecture. Although these extensions are not considered as verifiable claims, Chapter 5 describes some of their implications, including on the role of Architectural drawing in computerized design systems, on Architectural typologies, and on the nature and structure of generative systems in architecture.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Development of a computerized handbook of Architectural Plans
    , 1990
    Co-Authors: A. Koutamanis

    Abstract:

    The dissertation investigates an approach to the development of visual / spatial computer representations for Architectural purposes through the development of the computerized handbook of Architectural Plans (chap), a knowledge-based computer system capable of recognizing the metric properties of Architectural Plans. This investigation can be summarized as an introduction of computer vision to the computerization of Architectural representations: chap represents an attempt to automate recognition of the most essential among conventional Architectural drawings, floor Plans. The system accepts as input digitized images of Architectural Plans and recognizes their spatial primitives (locations) and their spatial articulation on a variety of abstraction levels. The final output of chap is a description of the Plan in terms of the grouping formations detected in its spatial articulation. The overall structure of the description is based on an analysis of its conformity to the formal rules of its stylistic context (which in the initial version of chap is classical architecture). Chapter 1 suggests that the poor performance of computerized Architectural drawing and design systems is among others evidence of the necessity to computerize visual / spatial Architectural representations. A recognition system such as chap offers comprehensive means for the investigation of a methodology for the development and use of such representations. Chapter 2 describes a fundamental task of chap: recognition of the position and shape of locations, the atomic parts of the description of an Architectural Plan in chap. This operation represents the final and most significant part of the first stage in processing an image input in machine environment. Chapter 3 moves to the next significant problem, recognition of the spatial arrangement of locations in an Architectural Plan, that is, recognition of grouping relationships that determine the subdivision of a Plan into parts. In the absence of systematic and exhaustive typologic studies of classical architecture that would allow us to define a repertory of the location group types possible in classical Architectural Plans, Chapter 3 follows a bottom-up approach based on grouping relationships derived from elementary Architectural knowledge and formalized with assistance from Gestalt theory and its antecedents. The grouping process described in Chapter 3 corresponds both in purpose and in structure to the derivation of a description of an image in computer vision [Marr 1982]. Chapter 4 investigates the well-formedness of the description of a classical Architectural Plan in an analytical manner: each relevant level (or sublevel) of the classical canon according to Tzonis & Lefaivre [1986] is transformed into a single group of criteria of well-formedness which is investigated independently. The hierarchical structure of the classical canon determines the coordination of these criteria into a sequence of cognitive filters which progressively analyses the correspondence of the descriptions derived as in Chapter 3 to the constraints of the canon. The methodology and techniques presented in the dissertation are primarily considered with respect to chap, a specific recognition system. The resulting specification of chap gives a measure of the use of such a system within the context of a computerized collection of Architectural precedents and also presents several extensions to other areas of architecture. Although these extensions are not considered as verifiable claims, Chapter 5 describes some of their implications, including on the role of Architectural drawing in computerized design systems, on Architectural typologies, and on the nature and structure of generative systems in architecture.

    Free Register to Access Article

Jukka Lahdensivu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • reusing concrete panels from buildings for building potential in finnish 1970s mass housing
    Resources Conservation and Recycling, 2015
    Co-Authors: Satu Huuhka, Tapio Kaasalaine, J H Hakane, Jukka Lahdensivu

    Abstract:

    Abstract A remarkable share of European mass housing was built with large-panel systems during the 1960s and 1970s. In many countries, this stock is already being demolished or demolition is discussed due to vacancies or social problems. This trend may result in the creation of an unforeseeable amount of concrete waste. Simultaneously, EU has issued the Waste Framework Directive aiming at reuse instead of recycling. Unlike in situ cast concrete, reclaimed prefabricated concrete panels from mass housing carry the potential for reuse. The purpose of this study is to review the reuse potential embedded in Finland’s mass housing stock from the perspective of the dimensions of the panels and spaces, i.e. , their suitability for Architectural (Plan) design. The research material consists of Architectural drawings of 276 blocks of flats that contain over 26 000 prefabricated wall panels and nearly 14 000 hollow-core slabs, the dimensions of which are compared to current norms and guidelines for dimensioning living spaces. The technical prerequisites for reuse are reviewed with the help of literature. The study results in identifying an inventory of panels typical to Finnish precast concrete construction, which, in principle, should not exist because the building Plans were not standardized but were supposed to be unique. The panels are found to be still usable in Architectural (Plan) design of detached houses, which form one third of annual residential production in Finland.

    Free Register to Access Article