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Artificial Reefs

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Stephen T Szedlmayer – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • home range and movement patterns of red snapper lutjanus campechanus on Artificial Reefs
    Fisheries Research, 2011
    Co-Authors: Darin T Topping, Stephen T Szedlmayer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) are associated with Artificial habitats in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). However, fine-scale movements and use of Artificial Reefs by red snapper over diel periods is unclear. Both manual and passive telemetry were used to examine fine-scale movement patterns and residence time of red snapper around Artificial habitats to evaluate the importance of these structures to this species. Red snapper (550–745 mm TL; n = 12) were manually tracked at Artificial Reefs in the northeastern GOM over 24-h periods. Fish stayed near the Artificial Reefs (

  • long term residence of red snapper on Artificial Reefs in the northeastern gulf of mexico
    Transactions of The American Fisheries Society, 2005
    Co-Authors: Stephen T Szedlmayer, Rebecca L Schroepfer

    Abstract:

    Abstract Red snapper Lutjanus campechanus (N = 54) were tagged and tracked on 12 Artificial Reefs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Fish were surgically implanted with ultrasonic transmitters and monitored with Vemco remote receivers and Sonotronics surface receivers from August 2000 to 2004. Four fish were manually tracked from the surface overnight, and their positions were recorded every hour for either 9 or 16 h. The total length of fish tagged was 589 ± 14 mm (mean ± SE). The number of detections by the remote receivers was 290,340 ± 44,696. By the end of this study, 5 fish were still being tracked, 8 fish had been lost immediately after tagging, 15 fish had been caught by fishers, and 26 fish had been lost after extended tracking. Red snapper were resident on Artificial Reefs for 218 ± 28 d, and residence time ranged from 1 to 595 d. We estimated that most (67%) of the tagged red snapper showed long-term residence (117–595 d), 13% were resident for 8–91 d, and 20% left the tagging site soon after …

John M Jenkins – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Artificial Reefs as recreational scuba diving resources a critical review of research
    Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 2007
    Co-Authors: Paul Stolk, Kevin Markwell, John M Jenkins

    Abstract:

    This paper reports on the increasing practice of developing and promoting Artificial Reefs as sites for scuba diving tourism and recreation. A comprehensive definition of Artificial Reefs is presented that encapsulates the diversity of structures used by marine recreationists, particularly scuba divers, followed by a review of existing literature that specifically examines Artificial Reefs as a resource for the conduct of recreational scuba diving. Three main thematic areas were identified in the existing literature: social dimensions, socioeconomic impacts and environmental engineering. A typology of Artificial Reefs is offered to better describe and categorise Artificial reef structures according to unit characteristics that may influence recreational use such as material used, appearance, complexity and cost. The paper presents a conceptual model that identifies the components of an Artificial reef scuba diving experience and discusses the potential of Artificial Reefs to act as tourism resources and m…

  • Perceptions of Artificial Reefs as scuba diving resources: a study of Australian recreational scuba divers
    Annals of leisure research, 2005
    Co-Authors: Paul Stolk, Kevin Markwell, John M Jenkins

    Abstract:

    Abstract Marine-based recreation and tourism activities have experienced substantial growth over the past few decades and concerns about the ecological sustainability of many of these activities have been recognised by researchers, policy-makers and the recreation and tourism industries. One strategy to deal with diver-induced impacts is the creation of new or Artificial Reefs which, when established, can become substitute dive sites for more naturally occurring Reefs. However, there have been very few studies into the acceptability of these substitute reef environments to divers and the social aspects of diving on Artificial Reefs. This paper explores the perceptions of diving on Artificial Reefs through a questionnaire survey of a sample of 337 Australian scuba divers. The awareness of Artificial Reefs as dive sites among respondents was very high, as were the levels of satisfaction with diving on such sites. Many divers recognised the value of these Reefs in reducing diver impacts on natural Reefs, and…

Paul Stolk – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Better than nature, or just different?: key experiential attributes of Artificial Reefs as resources for recreational scuba diving
    1st Annual International Conference on Tourism and Hospitality Research (THoR 2012), 2012
    Co-Authors: Paul Stolk

    Abstract:

    Recreational scuba diving is unquestionably a nature-based activity, being conducted underwater with a deliberate intention to interact with the surrounding environment. Indeed, scuba diving focuses on nature so strongly that a number of authors have argued that scuba diving-based tourism should be considered an example of marine ecotourism [1] [2] [3]. There are, however, some rather obvious questions regarding the ‘naturalness’ of scuba diving activity that focuses on Artificial Reefs, such as a shipwreck or the pylons of a bridge or pier. These sites can be thought of as highly modified settings or quasi-natural spaces, and are not traditionally considered within the mainstream understandings of nature. Despite this ‘hybrid’ status, Artificial Reefs and other modified spaces are becoming more widely accepted as ecotourism resources [4] and have considerable potential to supplement the range of ecotourism experiences available to visitors

  • Artificial Reefs as recreational scuba diving resources a critical review of research
    Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 2007
    Co-Authors: Paul Stolk, Kevin Markwell, John M Jenkins

    Abstract:

    This paper reports on the increasing practice of developing and promoting Artificial Reefs as sites for scuba diving tourism and recreation. A comprehensive definition of Artificial Reefs is presented that encapsulates the diversity of structures used by marine recreationists, particularly scuba divers, followed by a review of existing literature that specifically examines Artificial Reefs as a resource for the conduct of recreational scuba diving. Three main thematic areas were identified in the existing literature: social dimensions, socioeconomic impacts and environmental engineering. A typology of Artificial Reefs is offered to better describe and categorise Artificial reef structures according to unit characteristics that may influence recreational use such as material used, appearance, complexity and cost. The paper presents a conceptual model that identifies the components of an Artificial reef scuba diving experience and discusses the potential of Artificial Reefs to act as tourism resources and m…

  • Perceptions of Artificial Reefs as scuba diving resources: a study of Australian recreational scuba divers
    Annals of leisure research, 2005
    Co-Authors: Paul Stolk, Kevin Markwell, John M Jenkins

    Abstract:

    Abstract Marine-based recreation and tourism activities have experienced substantial growth over the past few decades and concerns about the ecological sustainability of many of these activities have been recognised by researchers, policy-makers and the recreation and tourism industries. One strategy to deal with diver-induced impacts is the creation of new or Artificial Reefs which, when established, can become substitute dive sites for more naturally occurring Reefs. However, there have been very few studies into the acceptability of these substitute reef environments to divers and the social aspects of diving on Artificial Reefs. This paper explores the perceptions of diving on Artificial Reefs through a questionnaire survey of a sample of 337 Australian scuba divers. The awareness of Artificial Reefs as dive sites among respondents was very high, as were the levels of satisfaction with diving on such sites. Many divers recognised the value of these Reefs in reducing diver impacts on natural Reefs, and…