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Artificial Turf

The Experts below are selected from a list of 1626 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Roald Bahr – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • injury risk on Artificial Turf and grass in youth tournament football
    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2012
    Co-Authors: Torbjorn Soligard, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    injury [odds ratio (OR): 0.93 (0.77–1.12), P 5 0.44] or in the risk of time loss injury [OR: 1.05 (0.68–1.61), P 5 0.82] between Artificial Turf and grass. However, there was a lower risk of ankle injuries [OR: 0.59 (0.40–0.88), P 5 0.008], and a higher risk of back and spine [OR: 1.92 (1.10–3.36), P 5 0.021] and shoulder and collarbone injuries [OR: 2.32 (1.01–5.31), P 5 0.049], on Artificial Turf compared with on grass. In conclusion, there was no difference in the overall risk of acute injury in youth footballers playing on third-generation Artificial Turf compared with grass.

  • risk of injury on third generation Artificial Turf in norwegian professional football
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: John Bjorneboe, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    Background Artificial Turf is used extensively in both recreational and elite football in areas with difficult climatic conditions. Objective To compare the risk for acute injuries between natural grass (NG) and third-generation Artificial Turf (3GAT) in male professional football. Study design Prospective cohort study. Methods All injuries sustained by players with a first-team contract were recorded by the medical staff of each club, from the 2004 throughout the 2007 season. An injury was registered if the player was unable to take fully part in football activity or match play. Results A total of 668 match injuries, 526 on grass and 142 on Artificial Turf, were recorded. The overall acute match injury incidence was 17.1 (95% CI 15.8 to 18.4) per 1000 match hours; 17.0 (95% CI 15.6 to 18.5) on grass and 17.6 (95% CI 14.7 to 20.5) on Artificial Turf. Correspondingly, the incidence for training injuries was 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0); 1.8 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.0) on grass and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.2) on Artificial Turf respectively. No significant difference was observed in injury location, type or severity between Turf types. Conclusion No significant differences were detected in injury rate or pattern between 3GAT and NG in Norwegian male professional football.

  • risk of injury on third generation Artificial Turf in norwegian professional football
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: John Bjorneboe, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Artificial Turf is used extensively in both recreational and elite football in areas with difficult climatic conditions. OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk for acute injuries between natural grass (NG) and third-generation Artificial Turf (3GAT) in male professional football. study design: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: All injuries sustained by players with a first-team contract were recorded by the medical staff of each club, from the 2004 throughout the 2007 season. An injury was registered if the player was unable to take fully part in football activity or match play. RESULTS: A total of 668 match injuries, 526 on grass and 142 on Artificial Turf, were recorded. The overall acute match injury incidence was 17.1 (95% CI 15.8 to 18.4) per 1000 match hours; 17.0 (95% CI 15.6 to 18.5) on grass and 17.6 (95% CI 14.7 to 20.5) on Artificial Turf. Correspondingly, the incidence for training injuries was 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0); 1.8 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.0) on grass and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.2) on Artificial Turf respectively. No significant difference was observed in injury location, type or severity between Turf types. CONCLUSION: No significant differences were detected in injury rate or pattern between 3GAT and NG in Norwegian male professional football.

Thor Einar Andersen – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • injury risk on Artificial Turf and grass in youth tournament football
    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 2012
    Co-Authors: Torbjorn Soligard, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    injury [odds ratio (OR): 0.93 (0.77–1.12), P 5 0.44] or in the risk of time loss injury [OR: 1.05 (0.68–1.61), P 5 0.82] between Artificial Turf and grass. However, there was a lower risk of ankle injuries [OR: 0.59 (0.40–0.88), P 5 0.008], and a higher risk of back and spine [OR: 1.92 (1.10–3.36), P 5 0.021] and shoulder and collarbone injuries [OR: 2.32 (1.01–5.31), P 5 0.049], on Artificial Turf compared with on grass. In conclusion, there was no difference in the overall risk of acute injury in youth footballers playing on third-generation Artificial Turf compared with grass.

  • risk of injury on third generation Artificial Turf in norwegian professional football
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: John Bjorneboe, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    Background Artificial Turf is used extensively in both recreational and elite football in areas with difficult climatic conditions. Objective To compare the risk for acute injuries between natural grass (NG) and third-generation Artificial Turf (3GAT) in male professional football. Study design Prospective cohort study. Methods All injuries sustained by players with a first-team contract were recorded by the medical staff of each club, from the 2004 throughout the 2007 season. An injury was registered if the player was unable to take fully part in football activity or match play. Results A total of 668 match injuries, 526 on grass and 142 on Artificial Turf, were recorded. The overall acute match injury incidence was 17.1 (95% CI 15.8 to 18.4) per 1000 match hours; 17.0 (95% CI 15.6 to 18.5) on grass and 17.6 (95% CI 14.7 to 20.5) on Artificial Turf. Correspondingly, the incidence for training injuries was 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0); 1.8 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.0) on grass and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.2) on Artificial Turf respectively. No significant difference was observed in injury location, type or severity between Turf types. Conclusion No significant differences were detected in injury rate or pattern between 3GAT and NG in Norwegian male professional football.

  • risk of injury on third generation Artificial Turf in norwegian professional football
    British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2010
    Co-Authors: John Bjorneboe, Roald Bahr, Thor Einar Andersen

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Artificial Turf is used extensively in both recreational and elite football in areas with difficult climatic conditions. OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk for acute injuries between natural grass (NG) and third-generation Artificial Turf (3GAT) in male professional football. study design: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: All injuries sustained by players with a first-team contract were recorded by the medical staff of each club, from the 2004 throughout the 2007 season. An injury was registered if the player was unable to take fully part in football activity or match play. RESULTS: A total of 668 match injuries, 526 on grass and 142 on Artificial Turf, were recorded. The overall acute match injury incidence was 17.1 (95% CI 15.8 to 18.4) per 1000 match hours; 17.0 (95% CI 15.6 to 18.5) on grass and 17.6 (95% CI 14.7 to 20.5) on Artificial Turf. Correspondingly, the incidence for training injuries was 1.8 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.0); 1.8 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.0) on grass and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.2) on Artificial Turf respectively. No significant difference was observed in injury location, type or severity between Turf types. CONCLUSION: No significant differences were detected in injury rate or pattern between 3GAT and NG in Norwegian male professional football.

Leonor Gallardo – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of structural components, mechanical wear and environmental conditions on the player–surface interaction on Artificial Turf football pitches
    Materials & Design, 2018
    Co-Authors: Javier Sánchez-sánchez, Ana Maria Gallardo, Leonor Gallardo, Jorge García-unanue, Pascal Hexaire, José Luis Felipe

    Abstract:

    Abstract The aim of this research was to determine the influence of the structural components, the mechanical wear and the environmental conditions on the mechanical behaviour of third generation Artificial Turf football fields. Twenty-three football specimens of Artificial Turf were evaluated according to the standards of quality established by the FIFA Quality Programme for football Turf (laboratory test). Mechanical properties were analysed according to moisture, temperature and wear conditions. The structural variables used were: carpet mass sample (g/m2), pile weight (g/m2), tuft m2 sample (tuft/m2), pile length sample (mm), pile yarn dtex sample (g/10,000 m), infill bulk density sample (g/cm3), stabilizing bulk density sample (g/cm3), incorporation of elastic layer. Temperature, in opposite of wear conditions, did not significantly alter the mechanical behaviour of the surface, although humidity reduced the absorption capacity of the Artificial Turf within the regulatory limits. The characteristics of the structural components can explain up to 78.1% of the variance in the mechanical behaviour of the surface. Therefore, the control and maintenance of the structural components is necessary for guaranteeing a safe and functional mechanical behaviour of the Artificial Turf surface.

  • Determination of mechanical properties of Artificial Turf football pitches according to structural components
    Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part P: Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Javier Sánchez-sánchez, Ana Maria Gallardo, José Luis Felipe, Pascal Haxaire, Jorge García Unanue, Leonor Gallardo

    Abstract:

    Structural components of Artificial Turf football pitches have been improved in the last decade. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of structural components on the in situ mechanica…

  • Physical and Physiological Responses of Amateur Football Players on Third-Generation Artificial Turf Systems During Simulated Game Situations.
    Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 2016
    Co-Authors: Javier Sánchez-sánchez, Pablo Burillo, José Luis Felipe, Jorge García-unanue, Pedro Jiménez-reyes, David Viejo-romero, Maite Gómez-lópez, Enrique Hernando, Leonor Gallardo

    Abstract:

    : Sanchez-Sanchez, J, Garcia-Unanue, J, Felipe, JL, Jimenez-Reyes, P, Viejo-Romero, D, Gomez-Lopez, M, Hernando, E, Burillo, P, and Gallardo, L. Physical and physiological responses of amateur football players on third generation Artificial Turf systems during simulated game situations. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3165-3177, 2016-The aim of this study is to evaluate the physical and physiological load imposed on amateur football players in a simulated game situation on different Artificial Turf systems. For that purpose, 20 football players (21.65 ± 3.10 year old) were monitored with Global Positioning Systems and heart rate bands during 45-minutes games on 4 selected Artificial Turf systems. The results show more covered distance in high-intensity ranges on the system with lower levels of damping and higher rates of rotational traction (p ≤ 0.05). Likewise, this system of Artificial Turf demonstrated a high number of sprints (12.65 ± 5.67) and more elevated maximum speed peaks during the last part of the game (28.16 ± 2.90 km·h) in contrast to the systems with better damping capacity (p ≤ 0.05). On the other hand, the physiological load was similar across the 4 Artificial Turf systems (p > 0.05). Finally, the regression analysis demonstrated a significant influence of the mechanical properties of the surface on global distance (15.4%), number (12.6%), and maximum speed (16.6%) of the sprints. To conclude, the mechanical variability of the Artificial Turf systems resulted in differences in the activity profiles and the players’ perceptions during simulated football games.