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Artificial Variable

The Experts below are selected from a list of 90 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

J.k. Fidler – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    IEE Proceedings – Circuits Devices and Systems, 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    It is shown that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable β, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of β it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation, when compared to a standard Bessel approximation, is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second-order active filter blocks) are used.

  • Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    ISCAS 2001. The 2001 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Cat. No.01CH37196), 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    This paper shows that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable /spl beta/, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of /spl beta/ it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation when compared to a standard Bessel approximation is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second order active filter blocks) are used.

  • ISCAS (1) – Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    ISCAS 2001. The 2001 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Cat. No.01CH37196), 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    This paper shows that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable /spl beta/, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of /spl beta/ it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation when compared to a standard Bessel approximation is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second order active filter blocks) are used.

Muhammad Imtiaz – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a streamlined Artificial Variable free version of simplex method
    PLOS ONE, 2015
    Co-Authors: Syed Inayatullah, Nasir Touheed, Muhammad Imtiaz

    Abstract:

    This paper proposes a streamlined form of simplex method which provides some great benefits over traditional simplex method. For instance, it does not need any kind of Artificial Variables or Artificial constraints; it could start with any feasible or infeasible basis of an LP. This method follows the same pivoting sequence as of simplex phase 1 without showing any explicit description of Artificial Variables which also makes it space efficient. Later in this paper, a dual version of the new method has also been presented which provides a way to easily implement the phase 1 of traditional dual simplex method. For a problem having an initial basis which is both primal and dual infeasible, our methods provide full freedom to the user, that whether to start with primal Artificial free version or dual Artificial free version without making any reformulation to the LP structure. Last but not the least, it provides a teaching aid for the teachers who want to teach feasibility achievement as a separate topic before teaching optimality achievement.

  • Artificial Free Clone Of Simplex Method For Feasibility
    arXiv: Optimization and Control, 2013
    Co-Authors: Muhammad Imtiaz, Nasir Touheed, Syed Inayatullah

    Abstract:

    This paper presents a method which is identical to simplex method phase 1, but do not need any Artificial Variable (or Artificial constraints). So, the new method works in original Variable space but visits the same sequence of pivots as simplex method does. Recently, (Inayatullah, Khan, Imtiaz & Khan, New Artificial-free Phase 1 Simplex Method, 2009) claimed a similar method, here in this paper we have presented a counter example which shows in some special conditions of degeneracy their method may deviate from the simplex path.
    Because of its simplicity, the method presented in this paper is highly classroom oriented. So, indeed there is no need to work with Artificial Variables (or Artificial constraints) in simplex method any more.

M.h. Capstick – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    IEE Proceedings – Circuits Devices and Systems, 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    It is shown that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable β, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of β it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation, when compared to a standard Bessel approximation, is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second-order active filter blocks) are used.

  • Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    ISCAS 2001. The 2001 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Cat. No.01CH37196), 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    This paper shows that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable /spl beta/, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of /spl beta/ it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation when compared to a standard Bessel approximation is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second order active filter blocks) are used.

  • ISCAS (1) – Delay approximation for synchronous filter topologies
    ISCAS 2001. The 2001 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Cat. No.01CH37196), 2001
    Co-Authors: M.h. Capstick, J.k. Fidler

    Abstract:

    This paper shows that the original definition of e developed by Euler can be used as the basis of a delay approximation where all the poles have the same value. Furthermore it is demonstrated that by splitting the Euler function into complex pole pairs, by the addition of an Artificial Variable /spl beta/, an additional degree of freedom can be introduced. Through optimisation of the value of /spl beta/ it is shown that either the group delay or step response can be optimised. This delay approximation when compared to a standard Bessel approximation is shown to provide acceptable performance for many applications. Furthermore, it offers the considerable practical benefit of being realisable as a cascade of identical building block elements when appropriate technologies (e.g. second order active filter blocks) are used.