Asbestosis - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Asbestosis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 252 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

John M. Dement – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • an epidemiological study of the role of chrysotile asbestos fibre dimensions in determining respiratory disease risk in exposed workers
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, Eileen D. Kuempel, S. Gilbert, Misty J Hein, John M. Dement

    Abstract:

    Background: Evidence from toxicological studies indicates that the risk of respiratory diseases varies with asbestos fibre length and width. However, there is a total lack of epidemiological evidence concerning this question. Methods: Data were obtained from a cohort mortality study of 3072 workers from an asbestos textile plant which was recently updated for vital status through 2001. A previously developed job exposure matrix based on phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was modified to provide fibre size-specific exposure estimates using data from a re-analysis of samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cox proportional hazards models were fit using alternative exposure metrics for single and multiple combinations of fibre length and diameter. Results: TEM-based cumulative exposure estimates were found to provide stronger predictions of Asbestosis and lung cancer mortality than PCM-based estimates. Cumulative exposures based on individual fibre size-specific categories were all found to be highly statistically significant predictors of lung cancer and Asbestosis. Both lung cancer and Asbestosis were most strongly associated with exposure to thin fibres ( 10 μm) fibres were found to be the strongest predictors of lung cancer, but an inconsistent pattern with fibre length was observed for Asbestosis. Cumulative exposures were highly correlated across all fibre size categories in this cohort (0.28–0.99, p values Conclusions: Asbestos fibre dimension appears to be an important determinant of respiratory disease risk. Current PCM-based methods may underestimate asbestos exposures to the thinnest fibres, which were the strongest predictor of lung cancer or Asbestosis mortality in this study. Additional studies are needed of other asbestos cohorts to further elucidate the role of fibre dimension and type.

  • An epidemiological study of the role of chrysotile asbestos fibre dimensions in determining respiratory disease risk in exposed workers
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, Eileen D. Kuempel, S. Gilbert, Martina Hein, John M. Dement

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND Evidence from toxicological studies indicates that the risk of respiratory diseases varies with asbestos fibre length and width. However, there is a total lack of epidemiological evidence concerning this question. METHODS Data were obtained from a cohort mortality study of 3072 workers from an asbestos textile plant which was recently updated for vital status through 2001. A previously developed job exposure matrix based on phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was modified to provide fibre size-specific exposure estimates using data from a re-analysis of samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cox proportional hazards models were fit using alternative exposure metrics for single and multiple combinations of fibre length and diameter. RESULTS TEM-based cumulative exposure estimates were found to provide stronger predictions of Asbestosis and lung cancer mortality than PCM-based estimates. Cumulative exposures based on individual fibre size-specific categories were all found to be highly statistically significant predictors of lung cancer and Asbestosis. Both lung cancer and Asbestosis were most strongly associated with exposure to thin fibres (10 microm) fibres were found to be the strongest predictors of lung cancer, but an inconsistent pattern with fibre length was observed for Asbestosis. Cumulative exposures were highly correlated across all fibre size categories in this cohort (0.28-0.99, p values

  • exposure response analysis of risk of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1997
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, John M. Dement, Randall J Smith, John Bailer, Stephen J Gilbert, Kyle Steenland, David P Brown, Richard A Lemen

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate alternative models and estimate risk of mortality from lung cancer and Asbestosis after occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos. METHODS: Data were used from a recent update of a cohort mortality study of workers in a South Carolina textile factory. Alternative exposure-response models were evaluated with Poisson regression. A model designed to evaluate evidence of a threshold response was also fitted. Lifetime risks of lung cancer and Asbestosis were estimated with an actuarial approach that accounts for competing causes of death. RESULTS: A highly significant exposure-response relation was found for both lung cancer and Asbestosis. The exposure-response relation for lung cancer seemed to be linear on a multiplicative scale, which is consistent with previous analyses of lung cancer and exposure to asbestos. In contrast, the exposure-response relation for Asbestosis seemed to be nonlinear on a multiplicative scale in this analysis. There was no significant evidence for a threshold in models of either the lung cancer or Asbestosis. The excess lifetime risk for white men exposed for 45 years at the recently revised OSHA standard of 0.1 fibre/ml was predicted to be about 5/1000 for lung cancer, and 2/1000 for Asbestosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the findings from previous investigations of a strong exposure-response relation between exposure to chrysotile asbestos and mortality from lung cancer, and Asbestosis. The risk estimates for lung cancer derived from this analysis are higher than those derived from other populations exposed to chrysotile asbestos. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

Leslie Stayner – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • an epidemiological study of the role of chrysotile asbestos fibre dimensions in determining respiratory disease risk in exposed workers
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, Eileen D. Kuempel, S. Gilbert, Misty J Hein, John M. Dement

    Abstract:

    Background: Evidence from toxicological studies indicates that the risk of respiratory diseases varies with asbestos fibre length and width. However, there is a total lack of epidemiological evidence concerning this question. Methods: Data were obtained from a cohort mortality study of 3072 workers from an asbestos textile plant which was recently updated for vital status through 2001. A previously developed job exposure matrix based on phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was modified to provide fibre size-specific exposure estimates using data from a re-analysis of samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cox proportional hazards models were fit using alternative exposure metrics for single and multiple combinations of fibre length and diameter. Results: TEM-based cumulative exposure estimates were found to provide stronger predictions of Asbestosis and lung cancer mortality than PCM-based estimates. Cumulative exposures based on individual fibre size-specific categories were all found to be highly statistically significant predictors of lung cancer and Asbestosis. Both lung cancer and Asbestosis were most strongly associated with exposure to thin fibres ( 10 μm) fibres were found to be the strongest predictors of lung cancer, but an inconsistent pattern with fibre length was observed for Asbestosis. Cumulative exposures were highly correlated across all fibre size categories in this cohort (0.28–0.99, p values Conclusions: Asbestos fibre dimension appears to be an important determinant of respiratory disease risk. Current PCM-based methods may underestimate asbestos exposures to the thinnest fibres, which were the strongest predictor of lung cancer or Asbestosis mortality in this study. Additional studies are needed of other asbestos cohorts to further elucidate the role of fibre dimension and type.

  • An epidemiological study of the role of chrysotile asbestos fibre dimensions in determining respiratory disease risk in exposed workers
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2008
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, Eileen D. Kuempel, S. Gilbert, Martina Hein, John M. Dement

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND Evidence from toxicological studies indicates that the risk of respiratory diseases varies with asbestos fibre length and width. However, there is a total lack of epidemiological evidence concerning this question. METHODS Data were obtained from a cohort mortality study of 3072 workers from an asbestos textile plant which was recently updated for vital status through 2001. A previously developed job exposure matrix based on phase contrast microscopy (PCM) was modified to provide fibre size-specific exposure estimates using data from a re-analysis of samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cox proportional hazards models were fit using alternative exposure metrics for single and multiple combinations of fibre length and diameter. RESULTS TEM-based cumulative exposure estimates were found to provide stronger predictions of Asbestosis and lung cancer mortality than PCM-based estimates. Cumulative exposures based on individual fibre size-specific categories were all found to be highly statistically significant predictors of lung cancer and Asbestosis. Both lung cancer and Asbestosis were most strongly associated with exposure to thin fibres (10 microm) fibres were found to be the strongest predictors of lung cancer, but an inconsistent pattern with fibre length was observed for Asbestosis. Cumulative exposures were highly correlated across all fibre size categories in this cohort (0.28-0.99, p values

  • exposure response analysis of risk of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 1997
    Co-Authors: Leslie Stayner, John M. Dement, Randall J Smith, John Bailer, Stephen J Gilbert, Kyle Steenland, David P Brown, Richard A Lemen

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate alternative models and estimate risk of mortality from lung cancer and Asbestosis after occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos. METHODS: Data were used from a recent update of a cohort mortality study of workers in a South Carolina textile factory. Alternative exposure-response models were evaluated with Poisson regression. A model designed to evaluate evidence of a threshold response was also fitted. Lifetime risks of lung cancer and Asbestosis were estimated with an actuarial approach that accounts for competing causes of death. RESULTS: A highly significant exposure-response relation was found for both lung cancer and Asbestosis. The exposure-response relation for lung cancer seemed to be linear on a multiplicative scale, which is consistent with previous analyses of lung cancer and exposure to asbestos. In contrast, the exposure-response relation for Asbestosis seemed to be nonlinear on a multiplicative scale in this analysis. There was no significant evidence for a threshold in models of either the lung cancer or Asbestosis. The excess lifetime risk for white men exposed for 45 years at the recently revised OSHA standard of 0.1 fibre/ml was predicted to be about 5/1000 for lung cancer, and 2/1000 for Asbestosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the findings from previous investigations of a strong exposure-response relation between exposure to chrysotile asbestos and mortality from lung cancer, and Asbestosis. The risk estimates for lung cancer derived from this analysis are higher than those derived from other populations exposed to chrysotile asbestos. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

A W Musk – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • the effect of Asbestosis on lung cancer risk beyond the dose related effect of asbestos alone
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2005
    Co-Authors: Alison Reid, Gina L Ambrosini, Nola Olsen, N H De Klerk, S C Pang, G Berry, A W Musk

    Abstract:

    Aims: To determine if the presence of Asbestosis is a prerequisite for lung cancer in subjects with known exposure to blue asbestos (crocidolite).

    Methods: Former workers and residents of Wittenoom with known amounts of asbestos exposure (duration, intensity, and time since first exposure), current chest x ray and smoking information, participating in a cancer prevention programme (n = 1988) were studied. The first plain chest radiograph taken at the time of recruitment into the cancer prevention programme was examined for radiographic evidence of Asbestosis according to the UICC (ILO) classification. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to relate Asbestosis, asbestos exposure, and lung cancer.

    Results: Between 1990 and 2002 there were 58 cases of lung cancer. Thirty six per cent of cases had radiographic evidence of Asbestosis compared to 12% of study participants. Smoking status was the strongest predictor of lung cancer, with current smokers (OR = 26.5, 95% CI 3.5 to 198) having the greatest risk. Radiographic Asbestosis (OR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.46) and asbestos exposure (OR = 1.21 per f/ml-year, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.42) were significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. There was an increased risk of lung cancer with increasing exposure in those without Asbestosis.

    Conclusion: In this cohort of former workers and residents of Wittenoom, Asbestosis is not a mandatory precursor for asbestos related lung cancer. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the asbestos fibres per se that cause lung cancer, which can develop with or without the presence of Asbestosis.

  • the additional risk of malignant mesothelioma in former workers and residents of wittenoom with benign pleural disease or Asbestosis
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2005
    Co-Authors: Alison Reid, Gina L Ambrosini, Nola Olsen, N H De Klerk, S C Pang, A W Musk

    Abstract:

    Aims: To examine the hypothesis that people with benign pleural disease or Asbestosis have an increased risk of malignant mesothelioma beyond that attributable to their degree of asbestos exposure.

    Methods: Former workers and residents of the crocidolite mining and milling town of Wittenoom are participating in a cancer prevention programme (n = 1988). The first plain chest radiograph taken at the time of recruitment into the cancer prevention programme was read for evidence of benign pleural disease and Asbestosis, using the UICC classification. Crocidolite exposure of former workers was derived from employment records and records of dust measurements performed during the operation of the asbestos mine and mill between 1943 and 1966. Based on fibre counts, exposure for former residents was determined using duration of residence and period of residence (before and after a new mill was commissioned in 1957) and interpolation from periodic hygienic measures undertaken from personal monitors between 1966 and 1992. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to relate benign pleural disease, Asbestosis, asbestos exposure, and mesothelioma.

    Results: Between 1990 and 2002, there were 76 cases of mesothelioma (56 of the pleura and 20 of the peritoneum). Cases had more radiographic evidence of (all) benign pleural disease, pleural thickening, blunt/obliterated costophrenic angle, and Asbestosis than non-cases. Adjusting for time since first exposure (log years), cumulative exposure (log f/ml-years), and age at the start of the programme, pleural thickening (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 1.2 to 7.6) and Asbestosis (OR = 3.3, 95% CI 1.3 to 8.6) were associated with an increased risk of peritoneal mesothelioma. There was no increased risk for pleural mesothelioma.

    Conclusion: The presence of benign pleural disease, in particular pleural thickening, and Asbestosis appears to increase the risk of mesothelioma of the peritoneum, but not of the pleura beyond that attributable to indices of asbestos exposure in this cohort of subjects exposed to crocidolite.