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Aseptic Processing

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K.a. Abdelrahim – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Residence time distribution of carrot cubes in starch solutions in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system
    Food Research International, 2003
    Co-Authors: K.a. Abdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, Michèle Marcotte, C. Toupin

    Abstract:

    Residence time distribution (RTD) of carrot cubes flowing in starch solutions was evaluated in a commercial pilot-scale Aseptic Processing system using a full factorial design of experiments employing flow rate (15 and 20 kg/min), temperature (80 and 100°C), holding tube length (0, 60 and 100%), particle size (6 and 13 mm) and starch concentration (3 and 5% w/w) as factors. All factors were found to be significant (p

  • Residence time distribution (RTD) in Aseptic Processing of particulate foods: A review
    Food Research International, 2000
    Co-Authors: H.s. Ramaswamy, Benjamin K. Simpson, K.a. Abdelrahim, James P. Smith

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aseptic Processing technique has been successfully applied to liquid foods and acid foods containing discrete particulates. However, the extension of Aseptic Processing to low-acid heterogeneous liquid foods containing discrete particulates has been difficult due to lack of data on critical factors such as interfacial heat transfer coefficient between the liquid and the particle ( h fp ) as well as the residence time distribution of particles in the holding tube of the Aseptic system. Conventional thermal Processing calculation methodology cannot be employed for the establishment of these processes, because of the difficulties associated with gathering experimental time-temperature data at the particle centre as it travels through the Aseptic system. Mathematical modelling followed by biological verification has been attempted as a possible alternative. These models require accurate data on the thermo-physical properties of the particles, associated fluid to particle heat transfer coefficient ( h fp ) as well as residence time distribution (RTD), especially in the holding section of the system. Both h fp and RTD depend on several factors which may also be interdependent: Theological properties, flow rate, temperature, and density of the carrier fluid, shape, density and concentration of the solid particles, as well as holding tube diameter and length. Rheological properties of the carrier fluids have been shown to influence fluid velocity profiles in the holding tube, and intuitively the food particle RTD in both the heat exchangers and the holding tube. The foci of this review are residence time distribution (RTD) of food particles in Aseptic Processing systems and the different experimental techniques used to gather RTD data as well as mathematical models used to describe RTD curves.

  • Residence Time Distributions of Meat and Carrot Cubes in the Holding Tube of an Aseptic Processing System
    Lwt – Food Science and Technology, 1997
    Co-Authors: K.a. Abdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, Michèle Marcotte

    Abstract:

    Abstract Residence time distribution (RTD) of meat and carrot cubes in the holding tube of a commercial pilot scale Aseptic Processing system was evaluated using a full factorial design of experiments employing holding tube length (4·6, 9·2, 13·8 and 18·4 m), flow rate (10, 15 and 20 kg/min), particle size (10 and 20 mm meat cubes and 6 and 13 mm carrot cubes) and concentration of the carrier fluid (40 and 60 g/100 g starch) as factors. All test factors significantly ( P r 2 > 0·95). The model parameters were responsive to test factors and could be well described using multiple regression analyses of test factors and their interactions.

Michèle Marcotte – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dimensionless correlations for the fastest particle flow in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system
    Lwt – Food Science and Technology, 2005
    Co-Authors: K.a. Albdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, S. Grabowski, Michèle Marcotte

    Abstract:

    Residence time distribution (RTD) of meat and carrot cubes in the scraped surface heat exchanger and holding tube of a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system were individually evaluated for characteristic correlations involving several dimensionless groups. RTD data obtained using a systemic approach were similarly evaluated. The sytemic approach was based an obtaining holding tube RTD as the difference between the RTDs in the whole system and a control system connecting the two scraped surface heat exchangers directly. Particle Froude and Reynolds numbers were related to carrier fluid Froude, Archimedes and Reynolds numbers as well as the particle-to-tube diameter ratio and particle Archimedes number ( R 2 > 0.84).

  • Residence time distribution of carrot cubes in starch solutions in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system
    Food Research International, 2003
    Co-Authors: K.a. Abdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, Michèle Marcotte, C. Toupin

    Abstract:

    Residence time distribution (RTD) of carrot cubes flowing in starch solutions was evaluated in a commercial pilot-scale Aseptic Processing system using a full factorial design of experiments employing flow rate (15 and 20 kg/min), temperature (80 and 100°C), holding tube length (0, 60 and 100%), particle size (6 and 13 mm) and starch concentration (3 and 5% w/w) as factors. All factors were found to be significant (p

  • PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF RECONSTITUTED CARROT/ALGINATE PARTICLES STABLE FOR Aseptic Processing
    Journal of Food Process Engineering, 2000
    Co-Authors: Michèle Marcotte, Ali R. Taherian, Hosahalli S. Ramaswamy

    Abstract:

    Textural and thermophysical properties of reconstituted carrot/alginate particles, subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses during Aseptic Processing, were investigated. Four levels of sodium alginate (4, 6, 8 and 10%) and calcium chloride (0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5%) and three levels of water addition (50, 150 and 300 mL) were used for two types of alginate (high in guluronic acid, HGA and low in guluronic acid, LGA). Hardness, water content, density and thermal conductivity of reconstituted carrot/alginate particles were determined using an Instron, an oven drying technique, a pycnometer measurement and a line heat source method, respectively. Moreover, Bacillus subtilis was inoculated in carrot/alginate particles.

    Reconstituted particles, unlike carrot cubes and other vegetables, were thermally stable. The moisture content increased with a decrease in calcium chloride concentration and an increase in water addition. There was no significant effect of formulation on density and thermal conductivity measurements. Reconstituted carrot/alginate cubes were able to sustain successfully thermal and mechanical stresses encountered in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system.

H.s. Ramaswamy – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dimensionless correlations for the fastest particle flow in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system
    Lwt – Food Science and Technology, 2005
    Co-Authors: K.a. Albdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, S. Grabowski, Michèle Marcotte

    Abstract:

    Residence time distribution (RTD) of meat and carrot cubes in the scraped surface heat exchanger and holding tube of a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system were individually evaluated for characteristic correlations involving several dimensionless groups. RTD data obtained using a systemic approach were similarly evaluated. The sytemic approach was based an obtaining holding tube RTD as the difference between the RTDs in the whole system and a control system connecting the two scraped surface heat exchangers directly. Particle Froude and Reynolds numbers were related to carrier fluid Froude, Archimedes and Reynolds numbers as well as the particle-to-tube diameter ratio and particle Archimedes number ( R 2 > 0.84).

  • Residence time distribution of carrot cubes in starch solutions in a pilot scale Aseptic Processing system
    Food Research International, 2003
    Co-Authors: K.a. Abdelrahim, H.s. Ramaswamy, Michèle Marcotte, C. Toupin

    Abstract:

    Residence time distribution (RTD) of carrot cubes flowing in starch solutions was evaluated in a commercial pilot-scale Aseptic Processing system using a full factorial design of experiments employing flow rate (15 and 20 kg/min), temperature (80 and 100°C), holding tube length (0, 60 and 100%), particle size (6 and 13 mm) and starch concentration (3 and 5% w/w) as factors. All factors were found to be significant (p

  • Residence time distribution (RTD) in Aseptic Processing of particulate foods: A review
    Food Research International, 2000
    Co-Authors: H.s. Ramaswamy, Benjamin K. Simpson, K.a. Abdelrahim, James P. Smith

    Abstract:

    Abstract Aseptic Processing technique has been successfully applied to liquid foods and acid foods containing discrete particulates. However, the extension of Aseptic Processing to low-acid heterogeneous liquid foods containing discrete particulates has been difficult due to lack of data on critical factors such as interfacial heat transfer coefficient between the liquid and the particle ( h fp ) as well as the residence time distribution of particles in the holding tube of the Aseptic system. Conventional thermal Processing calculation methodology cannot be employed for the establishment of these processes, because of the difficulties associated with gathering experimental time-temperature data at the particle centre as it travels through the Aseptic system. Mathematical modelling followed by biological verification has been attempted as a possible alternative. These models require accurate data on the thermo-physical properties of the particles, associated fluid to particle heat transfer coefficient ( h fp ) as well as residence time distribution (RTD), especially in the holding section of the system. Both h fp and RTD depend on several factors which may also be interdependent: Theological properties, flow rate, temperature, and density of the carrier fluid, shape, density and concentration of the solid particles, as well as holding tube diameter and length. Rheological properties of the carrier fluids have been shown to influence fluid velocity profiles in the holding tube, and intuitively the food particle RTD in both the heat exchangers and the holding tube. The foci of this review are residence time distribution (RTD) of food particles in Aseptic Processing systems and the different experimental techniques used to gather RTD data as well as mathematical models used to describe RTD curves.