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Aseptic Technique

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Simon Clare – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • How widely has ANTT been adopted in NHS hospitals and community care organisations in England and Scotland
    British journal of nursing, 2020
    Co-Authors: Stephen Rowley, Simon Clare

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND To the detriment of patient safety, the important clinical competency of Aseptic Technique has been notoriously variable in practice, and described ambiguously in the literature, internationally. From a UK perspective, attempts have been made to improve patient safety by reducing variability and improving education and practice through standardisation. The Welsh Government mandated Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) as a specific national standard in 2015. All healthcare organisations in England are required by the Health and Social Care Act 2008 to have a single standard Aseptic Technique, demonstrable by the clinical governance indicators of education, training, competency assessment and compliance audit. In Scotland, an education-based initiative was launched by NHS Education for Scotland in 2012. To review the impact of these and other initiatives on the current status of Aseptic Technique, all NHS trusts in England and NHS health boards in Scotland were assessed under the Freedom of Information procedure. FINDINGS 93% of NHS trusts in England use a single standard for Aseptic Technique. In 88% of these trusts the single standard was stipulated as being ANTT. In Scotland, 62% of NHS acute and community care hospitals within health boards use a single standard. In 56% of these, the single standard was ANTT. When including those that use ANTT in combination with other Techniques ANTT usage is 73%. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate significant progress in standardising Aseptic Technique education, assessment and governance, and confirms ANTT as the de facto Aseptic Technique used in NHS trusts in England and health boards in Scotland.

  • Right Asepsis with ANTT® for Infection Prevention
    Vessel Health and Preservation: The Right Approach for Vascular Access, 2019
    Co-Authors: Stephen Rowley, Simon Clare

    Abstract:

    Aseptic Technique, which involves infection prevention actions designed to protect patients from infection when undergoing invasive clinical procedures, is universally prescribed by guideline makers as a critical competency in the prevention of infections. However, no meaningful explanation of what Aseptic Technique is or how it is to be applied to ensure patient safety is provided within any of the guidelines. The Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®), originated by Rowley in the late 1990s, was designed to help address variable Aseptic Technique standards of practice and provide a rationalized, contemporary, evidence-based framework to standardize this critical competency and help improve standards of practice. The ANTT® Clinical Practice Framework provides a comprehensive framework for Aseptic Technique for all invasive procedures based on an approach termed Key-Part and Key-Site Protection. During the insertion or manipulation of an intravascular device, the ‘ANTT-Approach’ provides a systematic method that supports the practitioner to include all the important elements of Aseptic Technique, with particular focus on the identification and protection of ‘Key-Parts’ and ‘Key-Sites’ throughout the preparation and the procedure. This chapter provides clinical examples of how the ANTT® is implemented in the healthcare setting, as well as, importantly, how to promote compliance of the Technique.

  • Implementing the Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) clinical practice framework for Aseptic Technique: a pragmatic evaluation using a mixed methods approach in two London hospitals.
    Journal of Infection Prevention, 2017
    Co-Authors: Simon Clare, Stephen Rowley

    Abstract:

    Background:Aseptic Technique is an important infection prevention competency for protecting patients from healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Healthcare providers using the Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) Aseptic Technique have demonstrated reduced variability and improved compliance with Aseptic Technique.Objectives:The primary aim of this study is to determine whether standardizing Aseptic Technique for invasive IV procedures, using the ANTT® – Clinical Practice Framework (CPF), increases staff compliance with the infection prevention actions designed to achieve a safe and effective Aseptic Technique, and whether this is sustainable over time.Methods:A pragmatic evaluation using a mixed-methods approach consisting of an observational audit of practice, a self-report survey and structured interviews with key stakeholders. Compliance with Aseptic Technique before and after the implementation of ANTT® was measured by observation of 49 registered healthcare professionals.Results:Mean compliance with …

Stephen Rowley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • How widely has ANTT been adopted in NHS hospitals and community care organisations in England and Scotland
    British journal of nursing, 2020
    Co-Authors: Stephen Rowley, Simon Clare

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND To the detriment of patient safety, the important clinical competency of Aseptic Technique has been notoriously variable in practice, and described ambiguously in the literature, internationally. From a UK perspective, attempts have been made to improve patient safety by reducing variability and improving education and practice through standardisation. The Welsh Government mandated Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) as a specific national standard in 2015. All healthcare organisations in England are required by the Health and Social Care Act 2008 to have a single standard Aseptic Technique, demonstrable by the clinical governance indicators of education, training, competency assessment and compliance audit. In Scotland, an education-based initiative was launched by NHS Education for Scotland in 2012. To review the impact of these and other initiatives on the current status of Aseptic Technique, all NHS trusts in England and NHS health boards in Scotland were assessed under the Freedom of Information procedure. FINDINGS 93% of NHS trusts in England use a single standard for Aseptic Technique. In 88% of these trusts the single standard was stipulated as being ANTT. In Scotland, 62% of NHS acute and community care hospitals within health boards use a single standard. In 56% of these, the single standard was ANTT. When including those that use ANTT in combination with other Techniques ANTT usage is 73%. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate significant progress in standardising Aseptic Technique education, assessment and governance, and confirms ANTT as the de facto Aseptic Technique used in NHS trusts in England and health boards in Scotland.

  • Right Asepsis with ANTT® for Infection Prevention
    Vessel Health and Preservation: The Right Approach for Vascular Access, 2019
    Co-Authors: Stephen Rowley, Simon Clare

    Abstract:

    Aseptic Technique, which involves infection prevention actions designed to protect patients from infection when undergoing invasive clinical procedures, is universally prescribed by guideline makers as a critical competency in the prevention of infections. However, no meaningful explanation of what Aseptic Technique is or how it is to be applied to ensure patient safety is provided within any of the guidelines. The Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®), originated by Rowley in the late 1990s, was designed to help address variable Aseptic Technique standards of practice and provide a rationalized, contemporary, evidence-based framework to standardize this critical competency and help improve standards of practice. The ANTT® Clinical Practice Framework provides a comprehensive framework for Aseptic Technique for all invasive procedures based on an approach termed Key-Part and Key-Site Protection. During the insertion or manipulation of an intravascular device, the ‘ANTT-Approach’ provides a systematic method that supports the practitioner to include all the important elements of Aseptic Technique, with particular focus on the identification and protection of ‘Key-Parts’ and ‘Key-Sites’ throughout the preparation and the procedure. This chapter provides clinical examples of how the ANTT® is implemented in the healthcare setting, as well as, importantly, how to promote compliance of the Technique.

  • Implementing the Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) clinical practice framework for Aseptic Technique: a pragmatic evaluation using a mixed methods approach in two London hospitals.
    Journal of Infection Prevention, 2017
    Co-Authors: Simon Clare, Stephen Rowley

    Abstract:

    Background:Aseptic Technique is an important infection prevention competency for protecting patients from healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Healthcare providers using the Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) Aseptic Technique have demonstrated reduced variability and improved compliance with Aseptic Technique.Objectives:The primary aim of this study is to determine whether standardizing Aseptic Technique for invasive IV procedures, using the ANTT® – Clinical Practice Framework (CPF), increases staff compliance with the infection prevention actions designed to achieve a safe and effective Aseptic Technique, and whether this is sustainable over time.Methods:A pragmatic evaluation using a mixed-methods approach consisting of an observational audit of practice, a self-report survey and structured interviews with key stakeholders. Compliance with Aseptic Technique before and after the implementation of ANTT® was measured by observation of 49 registered healthcare professionals.Results:Mean compliance with …

Clare Hawker – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • National cross-sectional survey to explore preparation to undertake Aseptic Technique in pre-registration nursing curricula in the United Kingdom.
    Nurse Education Today, 2020
    Co-Authors: Clare Hawker, Molly Courtenay, Neil Wigglesworth, Dinah Gould

    Abstract:

    Abstract Background Aseptic Technique is a core nursing skill. Sound preparation is required during pre-registration nursing education to enable student nurses to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to prevent and control healthcare-associated infection and promote patient safety. Few studies have explored nursing students’ education and training in Aseptic Technique. Objectives To investigate what, when and how pre-registration nursing students are taught Aseptic Technique and how they are assessed in undergraduate, pre-registration nursing programmes in the United Kingdom. Design National cross-sectional survey exploring preparation to undertake Aseptic Technique in pre-registration nursing curricula in the United Kingdom. Setting Universities providing undergraduate, pre-registration adult nursing programmes in the United Kingdom. Participants Nurse educators. Methods Structured telephone interviews were conducted with nurse educators. Descriptive and inferential statistical data analyses were undertaken. Results Response rate was 70% (n = 49/70). A variety of different learning and teaching methods were reported to be in use. Teaching in relation to Aseptic Technique took place in conjunction with teaching in relation to different clinical procedures rather than placing emphasis on the principles of asepsis per se and how to transfer them to different procedures and situations. Wide variation in teaching time; use of multiple guidelines; inaccuracy in the principles identified by educators as taught to students; and limited opportunity for regular, criteria based competency assessment were apparent across programmes. Conclusions Pre-registration preparation in relation to Aseptic Technique requires improvement. There is a need to develop a working definition of Aseptic Technique. The generalisability of these findings in other healthcare students needs to be explored.

  • Understanding Aseptic Technique: an RCN investigation into clinician views to guide the practice of Aseptic Technique
    , 2020
    Co-Authors: Dinah Gould, Rose Gallagher, Jane Chudleigh, Edward Purssell, Clare Hawker

    Abstract:

    Aseptic Technique is recognised as an essential component of all infection prevention programmes but terminology used to define it varies. This publication is an RCN investigation into clinical views to guide the practice of Aseptic Technique. BD have funded this report. BD has had no influence on, or involvement in its content.

  • Aseptic Technique : a mixed methods study exploring undergraduate nursing students’ education and training in the United Kingdom
    , 2019
    Co-Authors: Clare Hawker

    Abstract:

    This sequential mixed-methods study explores learning and teaching approaches to Aseptic Technique in the pre-registration nursing curriculum. In Phase 1 of the study a national survey was undertaken to establish the different approaches used to teach Aseptic Technique in universities in England and Wales. Phase 2 took a case study approach to explore the learning and teaching of Aseptic Technique in two contrasting case study sites selected from the survey results. Although Aseptic Technique is undertaken by most practising clinical nurses on the general part of the nursing register nearly every day of their of working lives, it has attracted remarkably little research. This PhD makes a highly original contribution to the literature and does much to explain the existing suboptimal practice and misconceptions that have been described in the few studies that have explored how Aseptic Technique is undertaken by qualified practitioners.